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Discussion Starter #1
The Prime Minister of SVG broadcast to Petite Martinique and Carriacou that there was plenty of food in Union Island should residents of the aforementioned islands be in need.
The PM of Grenada responded by stating it was illegal to venture between the two nations and penalties for disobedience would be severe. He seem quite perturbed that the PM of SVG would make such a broadcast.

I can understand that Union Island residents are in dire need of customers, and their PM was just trying to help them, but I also understand that the Grenadian PM is correct and the quarantine is necessary. Last I heard, nobody is starving here, anyway.
It is always interesting living in the islands.
 

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I may have my geography messed up, but isn't Union Island part of SVG? If the SVG PM was saying Union Island had plenty of food, wasn't that within their borders. How does Grenada come into play? Again, may be messing up my geography.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
SVG PM was telling Carriacou & PM residents to come to Union to buy food. We went a week or so w/o a food delivery ferry, but we never ran out.
Like I said, SVG PM trying to drum up business for his folk. No biggie, just fun watching the two exchange words.
SVG borders are still open, I think. Grenada, not so much.
 

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Carriacou and Petite Martinique (PM) are part of Grenada. Not St Vincent.

In effect the SV PM was urging Grenada residents to break the curfew restrictions.
 

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Before all this occasionally would go by a small motor boat that had someone’s grandmother, ladies and a bunch of kids. Also a lot of packages. Or the odd box in a small local fishing skiff. On all the windwards there’s fishing villages on the Atlantic side as well as quite a few very small landing areas too shoal to allow sailboats (even cats). WOT and barely pushing along through the inter island passage. Can’t image those are well patrolled.
Duties are quite significant and ferries aren’t cheap. Don’t know but suspect smuggling on a small time (non drug or other contraband) has been going on long before covid to avoid taxes.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Duties are quite significant and ferries aren’t cheap. Don’t know but suspect smuggling on a small time (non drug or other contraband) has been going on long before covid to avoid taxes.
There are no duties between the member states of the EC nations, any more than there are between EU members. That is the whole point of these economic communities.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Misspoke. My bad. What about between French and EC?
French islands are French overseas regions and as such part of the EU, not EC.
There would be duty and immigration between the French islands and any EC island.
Our friends who operate restaurants and beach barbecues always appreciate it when their sailing friends bring them some cases of nice French wines, at the EU prices.
 

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We do the same and have actually gone up to Martinique or down to St. Martin for no other purpose than reprovisioning. Never thought about customs. If you did this in volume or not for personal consumption is it a taxable event?
 

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Discussion Starter #10
We do the same and have actually gone up to Martinique or down to St. Martin for no other purpose than reprovisioning. Never thought about customs. If you did this in volume or not for personal consumption is it a taxable event?
We sail to Martinique once or twice a year for olive oil, red wine vinegar and a few other items for chartering.
If you don't land the items ashore in succeeding countries, they aren't taxable unless you declare them. Even as a charter boat, as we travel between countries on charters most of the time (it is illegal not to do so if you are an unlicensed charter boat) I consider us a "yacht in transit", a kind of legal limbo as far as taxes go, in many countries.
SVG supplies us w/a charter boat license (for ec$1500.00), so we can day charter there, but that isn't available in any of the other EC countries, as far as I know, without registering the boat there and paying duty on it. As a foreign flag vessel, we can pick up or drop off in different countries, or we must have at least one country in between, ie; Dominica, St. Lucia, Dominica.
 
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