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1979 C&C 30 Mk I - 2QM15
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172 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I'm looking at Dinghy outboards... And although I'd love to have a brand new Evinrude 4.0hp four stroke, I'm trying to maintain budgetary sanity, so I'm looking in the used market.

Here's my question: On an 8' Dinghy, what is a luggable sized engine that will be easy enough to get on and off the dinghy (while onboard) without needing a crane.

I'm seeing lots of used 4-8 hp motors out there, but not much in the 1.5-2.5 hp range. Are these going to be too big, or heavy, to classify as luggable?

And is a "freshwater" designated motor fine for salt/brackish use as long as it gets a fresh water rinse after each usage?
 

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Telstar 28
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1,000 Posts
Go with 3.5 HP Tohatsu/Nissan/Mercury, if you can find one. The four-stroke is only about 37 lbs... and runs for about an hour on 1/3 gallon of gas. The smaller ones, <3 hp, usually don't have a transmission.
 

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1979 C&C 30 Mk I - 2QM15
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172 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
What are the particular advantages of having a transmission vs. having a lighter weight 1.5-2.5 engine?

As I said, given my preference, I'd want a really light engine that can be easily handled and just clipped to the aft railing because I'm thinking in terms of just a ship to shore tender for usage.

But so far I'm only finding 4-8hp motors in the used market, which all seem to weigh 60-85 lbs. I'm sure they'd get me where I'm going faster, but are these going to be unmanageable in terms of weight?
 

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We have the 2 stroke 3.5 Nissan/merc/tohatsu, it has a neutral postion, but must be spun around to "back up". Having the neutral is a really nice feature - it's good to be able to start the motor up and warm it up out of gear. I think it's around 29 lbs and I can take it off the transom and reach up and put it on the pulpit bracket one-handed without difficulty.

It's been remarkable reliable over the last 4 years, we paid around $1K CDN for it new.
 

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The Tahatsu (Nissan is the same) 4 stroke 4 hp engine we have is a liftable 57 lbs. Without a crane or davit you could use a spare halyard and a block on the end of your boom to winch it from the water and place it on the rail.

The advantage of the 4 hp Tahatsu is that it has an intergrel tank which will run for about 1 hour, but it also the smalllest hp outboard you can attach a small 3 gallon plastic tank and get great range for your dingy. The 4 strokes are great as there is no oil and gas mixing and they are very quiet

Dave
 

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What are the particular advantages of having a transmission vs. having a lighter weight 1.5-2.5 engine?
you can have better control at low rpms, since the centrifugal clutch used on the smaller motors requires a minimum RPM to activate it.

As I said, given my preference, I'd want a really light engine that can be easily handled and just clipped to the aft railing because I'm thinking in terms of just a ship to shore tender for usage.

But so far I'm only finding 4-8hp motors in the used market, which all seem to weigh 60-85 lbs. I'm sure they'd get me where I'm going faster, but are these going to be unmanageable in terms of weight?
no one is suggesting the >4hp motors.
 

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I had a little 2 stroke 2 horse that was SUPER light. I would suggest it... you don't need to go fast in the dink anyway. The smallest engine will get a dink up to hull speed. If you can get to hull speed rowing, a 1.5 hp engine will do it easily (but you will get fat.)
 

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Demand vs Supply

One of the problems one may encounter with the smaller engines is that demand outstrips supply. Lots of sailors want one of those little engines and those that already have one are loathe to give it up even if they no longer need it, because they may not be able to get one again. Not that there are not any available but moreso fewer are available. This drives up prices to a premium and makes them slightly more expensive than they need be. With the larger small engines 4hp - 9.9hp, they are more proliferant, many more are manufactured and there are more to choose from in a wider range of HP. Availability keeps prices from exceeding market value and therefor you are more likely to get an economical purchase.
The higher hp small engines are usually four stroke and very heavy so you will find the word luggable appropriate as they do have to be lugged around. I have a 5hp honda and that sucker weighs in at 60 lbs and is no easy feat to get on and off the dinghy transom and I am no small guy. I can shoulder press a 60 lbs dumbell but not the 60 lbs engine, it is too big and unwieldy. Nissan used to put out a 9.8hp 2 stroke that weighed in at 57 lbs, try and get one of those today, nobody wants to sell the one they have and if they do want to sell it they want a premium price. The 2 strokes are generally lighter for any given horsepower rating but there are also many lakes that do not allow them, hence the proliferation of four stroke technology. If you are willing to buy an engine that you can leave on the dinghy and tow it like that you will find you have a wider selection to choose from with more economical prices. Also do not discount how much more fun you can have with a bit more HP, there are trade offs as with everything.
 
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