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Discussion Starter #1
Hi, All

We're just back from a week of family cruising (from the Solent to Poole). Our original plan for the week was to cross the channel to Cherbourg, but I was too tired from work to plan that trip, so we spent the week "playing it by ear."

This is how it turned out:

Sunday: Gosport to Folly Inn on the Isle of Wight.
Monday: Folly Inn to the Needles, Alum Bay for lunch, then Yarmouth.
Tuesday: Yarmouth to Poole Harbor (Brownsea Island anchorage)
Wednesday: Second night in Poole Harbor (Brownsea Island)
Thursday: Poole Harbor to Lymington.
Friday: Lymington to Newtown River.
Saturday: Newtown River to Gosport.

Total nautical miles, only 113, but it was still a lot of fun.

Here's a chart of where we sailed:



It was an amazing week. I'll add a few more posts to this thread to show some of the locations.

A full photo gallery of the trip is available here:

A Week of Family Cruising, June 2009

Later on, I will post a link to a collection of our videos from the trip.
 

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Discussion Starter #2
As promised, here are a few more pictures.

Here's the Needles, as we saw them on Monday:



The circular structure on top of the light house is a helipad.

Here's another view, of the western-most edge of the Isle of Wight:



We happily hit 9.8 knots on the return trip through the Needles Channel with the help of the current.

At the end of the day, we sailed back into the Solent and took a mooring buoy outside of Yarmouth:

 

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Discussion Starter #3
More pics:

My daughter in her first class, private V berth cabin:



The big chain ferry that runs back and forth across the narrow entrance of Poole Harbor:



We had a great time exploring Brownsea Island in Poole Harbor:



On Brownsea, we visited several bird blinds:



Southern Rival, our Rival 34, at anchor behind Brownsea Island. Note that we now fly the US ensign, and the UK ensign as a courtesy flag:

 

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Discussion Starter #4
More pics:

The kids fish at Lymington:



Hiking around Newtown:



My son didn't have his land legs yet:



We didn't quite think far enough ahead about the effect of the tides on our ability to dinghy back to our boat from the Newtown Quay...

 

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Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
Last pics.

Daughter ready to go:



Some final notes about the trip:

1) At anchor behind Brownsea Island, it was gusting 18-20 knots in the evening, and a HR 34 had anchored quite close to us during the day. If we had dragged just one boat length, we would have clipped her. It wasn't fun sleeping that night.

2) The most memorable evening was at Newport, when we returned after four hours of walking (and no service to buy any food or drink in the area) to find our dinghy high and dry. We had to wait about 3 more hours (until the 10:45 p.m.) to have enough water to dinghy back out to the boat in the dark.

3) The passage to and from Poole Harbor was about 25 miles, which was a good step up for the kids. Our boat did great, especially through the channel chop and wind on the return trip.

All in all, a very good week. Our next adventure will be the first week of August, when we have a charter of a Pearson 38 in the San Juan Islands for a week.

As noted, a full photo gallery of this week's trip is at

A Week of Family Cruising, June 2009

Thanks, all.
 

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Nicely done, Jim.... nothing like a successful cruise with the whole family!
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I'd like to hear more about where one can find out about that Pearson 28 charter in the San Juans --- that's something I may want to do some day.

thanks,
Jon
Hi, Jon

We used to charter an Islander 28 from San Juan Sailing. It was a great boat-- sailed well and was holding up well. Unfortunately, the owner sold it about a year ago and it's no longer in charter (unless it's with a different company now).

You might want to check out this site:

48° North - The Sailing Magazine

They have San Juan area charter company information, and there are some companies in the area with older and more unique boats available, such as a Dana 24 or a Westsail 27.
 

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Jim, nice pics and story.

I have a question for you. You have a British-purchased (I seem to recall that the Rival 34 is British-built and I assume you found it there) boat kept in Britain and you fly an American flag at the stern with a UK courtesy flag...does that imply that you are American-registered and if so, how did that work in terms of taxes and fees?

I ask because I have a Canadian-registered boat, but dual-citizenship with the UK. It might make to "transfer my flag" for world cruising (or not) and it's difficult to get reliable information.
 

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Discussion Starter #12 (Edited)
Jim, nice pics and story.

I have a question for you. You have a British-purchased (I seem to recall that the Rival 34 is British-built and I assume you found it there) boat kept in Britain and you fly an American flag at the stern with a UK courtesy flag...does that imply that you are American-registered and if so, how did that work in terms of taxes and fees?

I ask because I have a Canadian-registered boat, but dual-citizenship with the UK. It might make to "transfer my flag" for world cruising (or not) and it's difficult to get reliable information.
The process of registering the UK boat with the USCG was pretty difficult. I needed a US Notarized Bill of Sale and proof of previous registration and de-registrations. My legitimate US address is in Oregon, so there wasn't a sales tax implication. I don't need an Oregon state license unless I sail in Oregon waters, but I did need to put the USCG number on the boat and the US port of call (Portland, OR). Worse still, the USCG documentation is only good for one year, and then has to be renewed, etc.

The boat was built in 1973, which is too old to be nailed for VAT tax issues in Europe (which is a major pain for boats built after 1981). It cost several hundred $ for this process, and I may need to get an international MMSI number from the US which is going to cost a couple hundred more, etc.

For you to UK register the boat (Small Ships Registry most likely, since Part I Registration requires expensive add ons), you may be liable for VAT taxes to get a VAT tax certificate for Europe (if you have a newer boat). I believe the rule is that you can have a boat in Europe for up to six months before you get in trouble for not having VAT certificate for even a foreign-flagged boat (unless it is older, like ours).

(I've heard really screwy stories about this. You enter European waters for over six months with a US flagged vessel, and you must pay VAT. You leave for six months and return, and you are supposed to pay VAT all over again if you stay over six months again, etc...

If you sail around Europe, you may be asked for boat registration documents, original sales document, and International Certificate of Competence, insurance certification, passports, etc. I heard of a boat that was fined 150 euros for not flying the French courtesy flag...

Also, if you UK register your sailboat, don't forget that it will become a yacht. The rear pulpit will become a pushpit. The dodger will become a sprayhood. The sea cloths will become dodgers. The boom vang will become a kicker. And red right returning will go right out the window...

Other than getting a permanent VAT certificate (and paying for it), I'm not sure having a UK flagged boat is an advantage. There may also be EU work that needs to be done to make a US/Canadian boat viable for registration. When UK citizens buy a US boat and bring it home, I believe there are re-working charges for bringing the boat to EU specs for registration. (There was an article about this in Yachting Monthly I should find for you.)
 

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That's a great story... Well done, Captain. I didn't realize the tidal range around the Isle of Wight was THAT wide...
 

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Thanks, Jim. I didn't think it was worth it, but one likes to have all the facts. I think I'll just stay Canadian federally registered, stay in compliance with Transport Canada regulations, and just expand my collection of courtesy flags (and I'll make the French one bigger than usual...)

I'll flash my British/EU passport on the rare instances it's useful to do so (like when I take RYA courses, perhaps!), but otherwise I'll maintain my splendid northern isolation.
 
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