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Possibly improving
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We spent the night plugged into shore power last night and non of the AC outlets worked. What are the troubleshooting steps I should take to address this? Thanks a lot.
 

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Pretty wide question, but here's some thoughts on the easy stuff:
1. Start with the shore power cord. The connectors are a weak point. Make sure they are fully seated. The most common ones require a little twist. I'm assuming in this case you don't have power at the panel in the boat.
2. If you have power at the panel, there is probably an volt meter or indicator showing this. If that's OK.
3. The next suspect is GFI outlets that have popped. Check these. Depending on how it's wired, a GFI popping on one outlet might effect the others.

I've skipped a number of other things that could have failed like the shore power cord itself, the stuff on the marina end, the circuit breakers, and wiring in between....the idea is start at the source and work towards the outlet. If you're not sure about working with 110 volts, hire someone to chase this other stuff or at least get someone to help you who is. Bad stuff can happen to you and your boat with 110....good luck
 

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Mermaid Hunter
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Voltmeter.

Make sure the outlet switch on the AC panel is on.

Check at the power pylon. Check at the boat end of the cord. Check at the back of the power receptacle. Check at the inlet to the AC panel. Check at the inlet to the battery charger. Check the outlet of the AC breakers for the outlets. Has GFCI tripped anywhere?

All checks are on an electrically hot system so if you aren't comfortable with that get qualified help.
 

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Sometimes the boat before you blew a breaker in the dock pylon, Then they switch plugs and blew that one too. Then they moved on ,not knowing how to go click click. Start there and test with a multimeter back to boat .Knowing your system can usually point to problem at a glance before you have to go out in the rain.
 

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My money is either a bad circuit breaker on your panel or more likely, a tripped GFCI outlet. FYI, 2 friends, 2 different boats, both had non working outlets. After some searching we found hidden GFCI outlets on both boats that neither owner was aware they were even there. Pressed the button and all of a sudden, all outlets were now working. It was a miracle.
 

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... another odd one, on my boat there is a circuit breaker in the aft locker. The shore power goes into a box, the breaker, then into the boat distribution panel.
 

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What have you checked? Is this your boat, a new boat, a rented boat? Above lists are pretty complete (I was once stymied by the breaker in the aft locker I didn't know about too).

It's not inconceivable that the outlets (some or all) are powered only by an invertor, rather than shorepower.
 

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Obviously you have discontinuous circuit...

1. Is the shore power breaker working and ON
2. Are the shore power cable plugs well seated?
3. Are all connections made up properly and not corroded?
4. Is there a main breaker inside the boat? (there should be) Are the connections made up properly and no corrosion?
5. Is there a distribution panel (circuit breakers)? Are the connections made up properly and no corrosion?
9. Are all the outlet connections made up properly and no corrosion?

Did you notice any melted plastic at outlets?

You should check for polarity and shorted wires.

Is there heat at any devices or wire?
 

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al brazzi
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.........
Yes and they only last so long in my bathroom at home, so on a Boat>>

My shore power cable that came with my current Boat never got hooked up, I didn't like the way it looked with all the black spots on the female end (can you say resistance) fire trap, probably not the OPs solution but a good place to start.
 

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... another odd one, on my boat there is a circuit breaker in the aft locker. The shore power goes into a box, the breaker, then into the boat distribution panel.
This is a safety standards requirement. If the wire distance between the AC inlet and AC panels main breaker is more than 10 wire feet then a breaker at the inlet is required..
 

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bell ringer
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This is a safety standards requirement. If the wire distance between the AC inlet and AC panels main breaker is more than 10 wire feet then a breaker at the inlet is required..
And if like mine they are sometimes easy to bump with a boat hook when I put it away in the stern locker (but hard to reach to reset).

On drifting note, I've only plugged into shore power 4 times in 8 years but half of those the shorepower on land showed burn marks from people connecting and disconnecting under load. I'm almost amazed that there isn't more fires due to shorepower.
 

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Not mentioned is many boats have a switch- shore power bow/shore power aft and multiple places to plug in. Each with its own on/off switch. I'm 30 amp but still have two in the stern and two in the bow. Been on 50amp boats with even more hookups placed amidships. Theoretically I could plug in four shore power cords. Also common is a switch for shore power v. generator. Going to need to just look around before taking out the multimeter. There is also sometimes a fused switch powering the whole A.C. board placed separately from the AC board "mains on" switch.
 

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This is a safety standards requirement. If the wire distance between the AC inlet and AC panels main breaker is more than 10 wire feet then a breaker at the inlet is required..
I've got that covered. Never knew it was required. I do like the idea that I can insure there will be no surge load, or live plug in, especially when others are "helping" plug back in. Since I have permanently installed glendenning cables, they are always connected. These breakers also prevent any back feed through the cable, from the inverter.

The downside is when someone overloads the circuit down below and trips that breaker in the lazzerette (inlet). Only seems to happen when pouring rain out and someone (me) has to go out and reset it.......
 

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Before this thread fades away Could I mention something I learned while GFIC'ing with boats. They don't like a common white wire when two are on separate black wires from same panel .Not an expert but somehow I muddle thru and never had an electrical fire in 40 yrs
 

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The first step in determining the root of the problem which is electrical in nature is owning and learning to use a volt meter. Even a basic $20 discount store meter can increase your trouble shooting ability a hundred fold because you are not guessing whether the proper voltage is present or if there is an open neutral. A test light will only lead to a bad end which I learned early in my career and gave me a diagonal cutter which now doubles as a wire stripper......
 

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Even if the Op doesn't show back up I always read and learn something.
I agree, but the OP has been back and posting in other threads. It would be nice for them to provide an update. It sort of returns the favor.

I have a suspicion the OPs boat is either new to them or rented and they're just getting used to it. We've all been there.
 
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