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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
For all Coronado 25 Owners and Others with Refit Experience.

I would really appreciate advice and perspective on the 1969 Coronado 25 for sale in Utah; link below:

Classifieds for Utah, Idaho, and Wyoming | ksl.com

Clearly not a diamond in the rough, but is it possibly a semiprecious stone? Does it look worth the effort to gain a good first sailboat to learn on and have my family onboard...does not have to be perfect, but must be safe and reliable. I have read posts here and elswhere on the Coronado 25 and if what this boat needs is truly mostly cosmetic, albeit significant cosmetic work, it sounds like it could be made a good starter keelboat to enjoy for a few years.

I am handy with tools and have experience with fiberglass and auto repair; to include auto body and paint.

Thanks
Eric
 

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Sailed one back when they were new. good sailing boat, we raced them back in the day and it was fun racing. sailed the around catalina island race several times and went through some nasty weather and the boat held up well.
this one looks like it may be all there but wil need a lot of work.
 

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The trailer is worth at least half the asking price. So, offer the guy half the asking price.
If you end up around $1500, you won't get too badly hurt, but expect a lot of gruntwork in the short term, and expect to spend money now- the instruments and radio are relics, which means there is a good probability that all of the other systems on the boat are just as obsolete. If you have $3-4000 to spend on a boat and no need to have a boat in the water right now, this might be a good candidate. BUT if you have a $2K budget and want to sail tomorrow, pass.
 

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Chastened
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I'm in total agreement with Jones. I was thinking if you got it for $1500, you'd be doing well. I owned one of these recently. It is an excellent learning platform. It has good cabin volume for a 25 footer. They are tough and simple.

You're in Utah, sailing in a lake so not having the hottest electronic suite is a non-issue. Go for it.

Oh- There is an active Coronado 25 forum on Yahoo. They can provide a lot of specific info on the boat.
 

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Barquito
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Check out the Pre-purchase Inspection list found on this forum. If all passes, AND the boat really does have everything you need to go sailing, go for it. However, if your long range plans are to have a reasonably nicely equiped boat, you might save money jumping into a boat that has already been updated.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thank you for your advice. I've asked the seller for some specific photos of possible problem areas and she has shared her assessment of the boat's condition. Appreciate the contribution of other members on the net as well, for the pre-purchase list and especially sailingdog for his excellent post on "Boat Inspection Trip Tips"
If the responses from the seller are good and the photos don't show any show-stoppers, I will be following sailingdog's blueprint. I'm looking to make this into a good, safe learning and pleasant starter boat for a year or so. My pre-purchase inspection will hopefully ensure this boat has the potential to be that starter without costing more than the purchase price, plus $2000 to finish the hull and ensure the necessary hardware is sound for sailing on the Great Salt Lake and other local fresh water lakes with my family and friends.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Well, my wife and I went down to Saint George and looked the boat over really well; first on Saturday evening in a heavy rain that had been going all day. Got a good look at all the through the deck leaks. Not unexpected. Other than a hole rubbed in the hull on the very stem of the boat from rubbing the dock for three years and several vertical hairline cracks on both sides of the keel, the hull is in good shape. Deck is solid though there are some stress cracks around the stations. Spent hours rapping all over the deck and hull and found only a few small areas where there is likely a little delamination. Prodded the plywood under the deck and only found one area of rot. Bulkhead is solid. Moved all over the deck and found no soft spots. Fwd hatch is good. Very nice six pad trailer with hydraulic brakes. Returned on Sunday in bright sunny weather and reaccomplished the complete hull and dock inspection. Keel boots look good, only one showing severe corrosion to the nut. Other three solid. Has a cast iron assembly with lifting eye bolted to the top. Desperately needs cleaning, naval jelly, then painting. Moved to inspecting the rigging and hardware, then looked over the sails and all the rest of the stuff on the boat. The marine head is rough, but is connected to an actual seacock...too bad there is no holding tank, so the head has to be removed or replumbed to meet today's environmental laws. Bottom line....we now own a gem in the rough, not a diamond, in the form of a 1969 Coronado. We brought her home on Sunday evening. Left work two hours early on Monday (our 35th wedding anniversary) and pulled off the sails, the cushions and the mast and all standing rigging, then moved the boat to the Great Salt Lake State Marina where I can work on all necessary repairs and cleanup to make this a good safe boat to learn on and enjoy. Will be able to clean and refit the hardware, sails and cushions at home as well. Mast looks really good, though it needs a bit of TLC in terms of wiring and peripherals allowed to deteriorate.
Excited and anxious to get at it and get the boat in the water. Sailing lessons with the Bonneville School of Sailing at Utah Lake are going very well; excellent experience.
 
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