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If I may chime in on this. What will the craft be used for? Looks pretty much like a a sailboat on the inside.

If I was going to race I would strip it down to the hull. If I was going to ply the northwest passage, maybe a heater and a rack for hunting implements such as spearing seals and polar bears. Maybe help bitcoin guy by installing liquid cooling equipment and sail next to him or even better take the gig to the tropics and pull up next to credit card captains and AC the boats at anchor. Endless possibilities, but first you have to admit you have a problem. Define your problems, create a wishlist then compromise.
 

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Here is a link that might help. It is Tim Lackey's site Northern Yacht Restoration. He details his wirk with pics and commentary daily. The link is to the work on his Triton 28 Glissando but every project is on the site day by day.

Pearson Triton #381 Glissando | Interior Projects Main Menu

Good luck and don't remove anything structural.
 

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Discussion Starter · #23 ·
If I may chime in on this. What will the craft be used for? Looks pretty much like a a sailboat on the inside.

If I was going to race I would strip it down to the hull. If I was going to ply the northwest passage, maybe a heater and a rack for hunting implements such as spearing seals and polar bears. Maybe help bitcoin guy by installing liquid cooling equipment and sail next to him or even better take the gig to the tropics and pull up next to credit card captains and AC the boats at anchor. Endless possibilities, but first you have to admit you have a problem. Define your problems, create a wishlist then compromise.
:laugher

Well, A) As much as I'd like to go after polar bears in the northwest passage, my actual needs are a bit more pedestrian. I'd like to enclose the head for privacy and sanitation (the admiral does NOT like the proximity of the head to the galley), and I'd like a place to sit and eat a meal or plot a course.

And B) Yes, I've been assured by many that I do in fact have a problem. So no worries there, I admit it. :D
 

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:laugher

.... and I'd like a place to sit and eat a meal or plot a course.

:D
Too many boats, especially 30' and under, don't have one, good, seat. Designed to sleep 4 to 6, the settees are often poor seating. Too low to feel comfortable, too wide to allow a back rest and no chance for any easy fix and few feel comfortable 'working' at the table.

I can recall more than one person telling me, "There's not one good seat on my boat". :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #25 ·
Here is a link that might help. It is Tim Lackey's site Northern Yacht Restoration. He details his wirk with pics and commentary daily. The link is to the work on his Triton 28 Glissando but every project is on the site day by day.

Pearson Triton #381 Glissando | Interior Projects Main Menu

Good luck and don't remove anything structural.
Neat site, thanks. It's inspiring to see what he was able to accomplish alone in his back yard. I see I'm not going to get much work done this afternoon...
 

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Discussion Starter · #26 ·
Too many boats, especially 30' and under, don't have one, good, seat. Designed to sleep 4 to 6, the settees are often poor seating. Too low to feel comfortable, too wide to allow a back rest and no chance for any easy fix and few feel comfortable 'working' at the table.

I can recall more than one person telling me, "There's not one good seat on my boat". :)
That's it exactly. The number of times we've needed (or wanted) to sleep 4-6 people on board is exactly zero. If it's more than 2 or 3, we're probably going to pitch a tent on the beach. But I don't think a week goes by that we don't have 4-6 aboard for an all day or multi-day cruise. That's a lot of time for people to spend in a small, uncomfortable space, each one hoping they won't have to use the head. A thoughtful layout could really improve the experience for everyone.

Of course, the sensible thing to do would probably be to trade it in for a boat that has the cabin layout we want. But where's the fun in that? :)
 

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This sure looks like a pan boat. You cannot change the interior layout, the pan is structural.

You might be able to install a vertical holding tank behind the toilet?
Lee Sanitation Online Store for Marine Toilet Parts Service Kits

Or switch to a porta potti.

f
Well, this post isn't really meant to be about a specific design, but more about how one should go about educating oneself on how to do these things.

That being said, I did manage to find a couple of interior shots. Not the best, but gives some idea.

The first is the port side galley sink and a bit of the seat/quarter-berth as well as a bit of the head.



This one shows some of the starboard side galley stove, seat/quarter-berth, and what passes for a main saloon table.



The two sides are virtually symmetrical, with a narrow bench/berth on either side, leaving a fairly wide walkway down the middle. One of the main problems is that there's no place to sit and have a meal. But more importantly, the head is not enclosed, and it is crammed into a very small space.

The cabin layout for our boat shown on sailboatdata.com is very different. The head and saloon table/seating occupy the full port side half, while the galley, quarter-berth and hanging locker are arranged on the starboard side taking only half the space that the port side does. If I could mimic this layout, and install a couple of interior doors as well, I'd be very happy with it.

 

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Discussion Starter · #28 ·
This sure looks like a pan boat. You cannot change the interior layout, the pan is structural.

You might be able to install a vertical holding tank behind the toilet?
Lee Sanitation Online Store for Marine Toilet Parts Service Kits

Or switch to a porta potti.

f
Well I had to look up what a pan boat is, and although I was surprised that the technique was actually in use in the 60s, ours is "stick built".

Thanks for the holding tank link. The vertical tanks with integrated vacuum generators are pretty neat (insofar as a sanitation system can be neat, I mean. Obviously).
 

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Looking at your boats cabin plan and photos again, I think you'd like a dinette below. We coastal sailed for 13 years with a dinette for two on starboard, and settee to port, on a Cape Dory 28.

We didn't cross oceans, but we sailed that boat from Canada to the Bahamas, twice. As a couple, we lived on those two dinette seats. We ate there, navigated there, I used it as a work bench.

It was the perfect standing height for working from the sole, cooking etc, and best of all, sitting, comfortably.

I loved that it was permanent-no tear down/set up of a sketchy table that blocks foot traffic. Good dry storage below the cushions. Well fasten and with a high fiddle outboard, it was the main grab rail below.

In use, on a Port tack, it's was like a cradle seat, starboard, prop a pillow under you. But the truth is, we spent most of our 13 years at anchor, and few days on starboard tack. :)

Then we added two babies to that boat, and still used the dinette. It was the best part of that boats lay out below. You'll read and hear negatives to a dinette on a boat this small, but we had 13 years excellent use. We loved it.

As projects go, it's an easy one, believe it or not. If you do the design work(making sure you can do this structurally-I think you can), it's little more than cutting out the well area in the settee and close off the ends of the cuts. Then you'll likely build a raised 6-+" box for the two seats. These can then be extended inboard-if you have the centerline space. Then mount a raised sole(it can angle slightly). Finally, build and mount a table, done.

Make it as fancy or as spartan as you like.

Your head, I can't see for sure, but why not just install a better head-holding tank system, and put a door on it? It could be bi-fold, lot's of fixes there. You do need a door. Those are main bulkheads around it and probably can't be moved.
 

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I'll add my two cents before I spend it at Defender. We are using cherry to trim out the boat. Here in east TN cherry goes for $1.00 a board foot rough, log run at the saw mill.


I use foam poster boards from the dollar store to make patterns. I find they are a bit stiffer than cardboard and cut easier. A hot glue gun is your friend. Hot glue stuff to hold it in place while the epoxy kicks off.

Get some hold down clamps, fasten them to a table saw sled. They come in handy when making cuts for scarfing joints.

To the OP have you looked around to see what owners of your model boat have done?
 
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I found a grainy scan of that dinette. This is our son in one of those clamp on high chairs. He's 22 now.

This table could have been longer, but we added needed dry storage forward. The sole to seat top and then to table height are the most important. Then shoulder height to under deck. Other than that, you can see we didn't change much. You can just see the diagonal fixed brace under the table. That kept the foot area open.

If I had it to do over, I would have extended each raised seat 'box' 4 inches or so toward the centerline. We had plenty of space there and that would have improved it.

Each cushion, velcroed to plywood, lifted out for new needed storage. That was very handy for tools and spares.

Our head looks no bigger than yours. There was a door starboard that closed it and the vee berth off.

 

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It's all very easy. Just do a drawing like this:

This drawing was a done by 16 year old Will Porter who just spent 16 days staying with me and doing an informal internship. This drawing is his very first interior design.
 

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Discussion Starter · #35 · (Edited)
I found a grainy scan of that dinette. This is our son in one of those clamp on high chairs. He's 22 now.

This table could have been longer, but we added needed dry storage forward. The sole to seat top and then to table height are the most important. Then shoulder height to under deck. Other than that, you can see we didn't change much. You can just see the diagonal fixed brace under the table. That kept the foot area open.

If I had it to do over, I would have extended each raised seat 'box' 4 inches or so toward the centerline. We had plenty of space there and that would have improved it.

Each cushion, velcroed to plywood, lifted out for new needed storage. That was very handy for tools and spares.

Our head looks no bigger than yours. There was a door starboard that closed it and the vee berth off.
I hadn't considered a fixed table, but you make a good case for it. Not only does it allow you to make it extra sturdy, but it's size and position aren't influenced by storage/dual-purpose concerns.

Yes, I believe both bulkheads are structural (probably doing important things like supporting the mast). I could probably change where the hatch openings are though. Making the port side bulkhead wall longer, for example.

Currently I'm toying with the idea of building a door that can be used to close off either the head or the bulkhead. Hung from the port side of the aft bulkhead, it would normally be used to enclose the head. To use the head, one would open the door, swinging it 90 degrees aft and latch into the bulkhead door jamb. This would provide privacy from the main cabin (same as your door did). Need to research any hinges and/or door designs that would allow this to work.

Thanks for the thoughtful posts and pic. It helps get the wheels turning...
 

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Discussion Starter · #36 ·
It's all very easy. Just do a drawing like this:

This drawing was a done by 16 year old Will Porter who just spent 16 days staying with me and doing an informal internship. This drawing is his very first interior design.
Well, it's a thrill just having such a talented designer chime in on this little thread. Young Will is a lucky man.

So if I've got this right, all I have to do is come out for a 2 week internship with you, and I'll be able to redesign my cabin? Deal. :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #37 ·
I'll add my two cents before I spend it at Defender. We are using cherry to trim out the boat. Here in east TN cherry goes for $1.00 a board foot rough, log run at the saw mill.

I use foam poster boards from the dollar store to make patterns. I find they are a bit stiffer than cardboard and cut easier. A hot glue gun is your friend. Hot glue stuff to hold it in place while the epoxy kicks off.

Get some hold down clamps, fasten them to a table saw sled. They come in handy when making cuts for scarfing joints.

To the OP have you looked around to see what owners of your model boat have done?
Thanks for the tips, and yes, I've scoured the interwebs for pictures of other HR-28 interiors and squirreled away a few dozen. Almost all feature the standard factory layout shown in the drawings from sailboatdata.com. I guess ours was an earlier version, or possible modified by a previous owner.
 

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Col:
There are a few key dimensions that you need to be aware of so that the human body will be comfy in what you build. You don't need to invent any table/chair relationships. That's all been done before. I'd be happy to look over what you do and give advice if I see any red flags.

The best advice you have received here is to mock things up. You can use photo board, cardboard, thin plywood but build your idea so you can see it in real life. I do pretty good drawings but I like to see a mock up before proceeding.

Young Will gets introduced to some good, old fashioned hand drafting techniques. He had a ball with this. Analog forever!
 

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Discussion Starter · #39 ·
Col:
There are a few key dimensions that you need to be aware of so that the human body will be comfy in what you build. You don't need to invent any table/chair relationships. That's all been done before. I'd be happy to look over what you do and give advice if I see any red flags.

The best advice you have received here is to mock things up. You can use photo board, cardboard, thin plywood but build your idea so you can see it in real life. I do pretty good drawings but I like to see a mock up before proceeding.

Young Will gets introduced to some good, old fashioned hand drafting techniques. He had a ball with this. Analog forever!
Thanks, Bob. I may take you up on that. I expect this will either be a fun project, or a total nightmare. But either way, it should be good learning experience with minimal lethal risk.

Both my father and grandfather were pretty handy with the drafting techniques. I'm really not great with either analog or digital, but am also not afraid to try. :)
 

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No way will this be a nightmare. This will be fun. I just worked with a friend on a similar project.
You are going to get a lot of help right here.
We'll slap you around if you get out of control. I'll check with the Mods to see if slapping around is allowed on SN.

And remember, the eraser or delete button can be a very creative tool.

Young Will holds up his very first computer faired set of hull lines. He was proud.
 
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