SailNet Community banner

1 - 14 of 14 Posts

·
Super Fuzzy Moderator
Joined
·
17,137 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Jon Eisberg ..... One advantage for me of having AIS integrated to the VHF, I don't have to be running a more power-hungry plotter to enjoy the benefits of AIS...

I've heard of this but know little about it. Think of AIS as a visual aid, meaning that the fixes appear on the plotter or puter screen. How does the radio present the information ?
 

·
Once known as Hartley18
Joined
·
5,179 Posts
TD, there was thread on this a while back...

I believe the radio in question is the Standard Horizon GX2100-series which, unfortunately, is not available in Oz. It has an AIS target display showing MMSI, Call Sign, Ship Name, BRG, DST, SOG and COG and allows the user to quickly contact an AIS-targeted ship using DSC which is kinda cool - especially in an emergency.

The GX2100 provides NMEA output to a chartplotter, which it needs to get GPS data from (NMEA again) since it doesn't have a built-in GPS - so it's really intended to be used with a chartplotter and an associated instrument suite... although it seems there is now a GX2200 with inbuilt GPS! :eek:

Do keep in mind that these radios (this one anyway) are AIS receivers - not transponders. That would require something a whole lot more sophisticated again, with an associated drain on the batteries.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
267 Posts
Taking it a step further, the GX2200 has both integrated GPS and AIS. They actually display a dot-matrix display on-screen, similar to a radar circle, with blips for AIS targets within a certain range. They can then be hooked up to external plotters etc for better viewing and more detail.

I'd recommend downloading the manual and reading through for more information on it (I don't have mine installed in the boat yet, so I can't really say much on it yet)
 

·
Once known as Hartley18
Joined
·
5,179 Posts
I believe the radio in question is the Standard Horizon GX2100-series which, unfortunately, is not available in Oz. It has an AIS target display showing MMSI, Call Sign, Ship Name, BRG, DST, SOG and COG and allows the user to quickly contact an AIS-targeted ship using DSC which is kinda cool - especially in an emergency.
..after reading the Manual (a fairly serious download) I notice it states "The MATRIX Series VHF's operate on all currently-allocated marine channels which are switchable for use with USA, International or Canadian regulations.". Ignoring the crappy English, I have never understood why the USA insist on being, not just different from the rest of the world ("International") but Canada also?!? It seems those on the far side of the ocean can't agree on anything. :rolleyes:

Anyway, my point being, Fuzzy 'ol pal, that if one were to import one from the States it should work here just fine...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
217 Posts
..have never understood why the USA insist on being, not just different from the rest of the world ("International") but Canada also?!?
Far be it from me to excuse anything done by the country to the south of us in the Great White North, but they and we do have a need for more simplex, and fewer duplex, channels than are internationally defined. Then again, the US went and auctioned off their duplex telephone channels.

We also deal with some legacy spectrum planning issues, like the first few channels having belonged to the railways in parts of Canada. And there's the matter of a great chunk of both countries being, er, rather far from any coastline.

I teach the Restricted Operator's Certificate (Maritime) course for our local squadron, and even I find that the matrix of channels/areas/users/authorized-uses is, well, convoluted to say the least.

On topic, I have a SH GX2150 (with AIS, without GPS) hooked up to both ship's GPS (to radio) and chartplotter (from radio) and am very happy with it. The radio *and* its remote mic both have a simple and easily readable display of nearby AIS targets with vectors, and you can call up additional detail on any, as well as call them directly by MMSI. The display is small but uncluttered, to the point where it's often easier to see than the targets on the chartplotter hidden amongst all the other info.
 

·
Once known as Hartley18
Joined
·
5,179 Posts
Far be it from me to excuse anything done by the country to the south of us in the Great White North, but they and we do have a need for more simplex, and fewer duplex, channels than are internationally defined. Then again, the US went and auctioned off their duplex telephone channels.

We also deal with some legacy spectrum planning issues, like the first few channels having belonged to the railways in parts of Canada. And there's the matter of a great chunk of both countries being, er, rather far from any coastline.
The railways.. that makes sense. Thanks! :)

Spectrum planning issues occur everywhere (blimey, we've had to deal with our fair share and there's nothing quite like a bit of channel interference to help people make the shift*) but I guess some countries have more desire to do something about it than others. I don't imagine it would be too difficult to simply tell everyone they need to switch to 'International' after a certain date.. but then given the bureaucracy, time and costs involved - nah, it's not going to happen.

* = Over here, the spectrum for wireless microphones (the type used at concerts and conferences) has changed twice in the past 20 years or so and is changing again right now. On the verge of one change, we had been demonstrating a new system in a local church which happened to have a gymnasium next door. The preacher couldn't see the need to spend the $$$ until, suddenly, right at a key point in the middle of his sermon, a high-pitched female voice broke in loud and clear over the speakers saying "C'mon girls! Lift those legs!!!". We got the order for new mics the very next day. :D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,036 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,454 Posts
Hey,

The radio has a small 'radar' like display.

To the best of my knowledge there are a few radios that integrate AIS receivers:
Standard Horizon GX2150 / GX2200. These use NMEA 0181 to interface with other devices like chart plotters. The GX200 has a built in GPS while the 2150 gets GPS info from the network. These radios support a second corded mic.

Navico (Lowrance LINC 8, Simrad RS35). These radios use NMEA 2000 so connectivity should be plug and play. The RS35 can use the HS35 wireless remote.

ICom 506 (not available in US yet). This is another unit that uses NMEA 2000 for connectivity.

I have the SH 2150 on my current boat. It works well and I send the AIS data to a PC running seaclear that can display the AIS information. The remote mic is in the cockpit so that at night I can determine how close the ferry will get to me, and when I need to change course to stay out of the way.

Barry

I've heard of this but know little about it. Think of AIS as a visual aid, meaning that the fixes appear on the plotter or puter screen. How does the radio present the information ?
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,851 Posts
So, I bought a 2100 a couple of years ago. Just now got a chartplotter for it. Problem is that the 2100 is not fully compatible with my chartplotter since the data rates for the NEMA 183 interface don't support my single NEMA 183 interface on my chartplotter.. the 2100 wants to send some data at low speed and other at high speed.

They made a software mod on the 2150 model to allow all data to operate at the same speed, which is good.

So I have to decide between AIS or DSC, which is disappointing.

the 2200 seems to be a better way to go, since the GPS is integral, and you only need one data connection.

So

I wish they would support NMEA 2000.. I would rather only have one network on my boat.

I expressed my frustration to a Standard Horizon rep at the boat show. He wasn't particularly sympathetic. He did think that they would eventually support NEMA 2000


My choices seem to me to be:

1) Just hookup one data connection to my chart plotter. No DSC
2) Sell my radio, and get a 2200
3) Get a dedicated transponder... (Maybe I really should be transmitting anyhow
4) Continue to sulk about this
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,036 Posts
So, I bought a 2100 a couple of years ago. Just now got a chartplotter for it. Problem is that the 2100 is not fully compatible with my chartplotter since the data rates for the NEMA 183 interface don't support my single NEMA 183 interface on my chartplotter.. the 2100 wants to send some data at low speed and other at high speed.

They made a software mod on the 2150 model to allow all data to operate at the same speed, which is good.

So I have to decide between AIS or DSC, which is disappointing.

the 2200 seems to be a better way to go, since the GPS is integral, and you only need one data connection.

So

I wish they would support NMEA 2000.. I would rather only have one network on my boat.

I expressed my frustration to a Standard Horizon rep at the boat show. He wasn't particularly sympathetic. He did think that they would eventually support NEMA 2000


My choices seem to me to be:

1) Just hookup one data connection to my chart plotter. No DSC
2) Sell my radio, and get a 2200
3) Get a dedicated transponder... (Maybe I really should be transmitting anyhow
4) Continue to sulk about this
All the VHF i listed in my post support NMEA 2000 http://www.sailnet.com/forums/1461722-post7.html

I have an em-trak AIS B transponder - it can send AIS data on NMEA 0183 (high speed AIS need high speed NMEA 0183 port) and NMEA 2000 at the same time, solve the problem with older equipment.
AIS B100 https://em-trak.com/
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,851 Posts
Cool.. thanks! I may still need to sulk some more... Anybody want a deal on a 2100?
 

·
Sailboat Reboot
Joined
·
652 Posts
..after reading the Manual (a fairly serious download) I notice it states "The MATRIX Series VHF's operate on all currently-allocated marine channels which are switchable for use with USA, International or Canadian regulations.". Ignoring the crappy English, I have never understood why the USA insist on being, not just different from the rest of the world ("International") but Canada also?!? It seems those on the far side of the ocean can't agree on anything. :rolleyes:

Anyway, my point being, Fuzzy 'ol pal, that if one were to import one from the States it should work here just fine...
Actually there are a couple of reasons:
1. The US Band Plan was established before there was much in the way of world cruising. It didn't work (as pointed out for Canada) so the rest of the world went its own way.
2. The difficulty to change a band plan is pretty severe. When LORAN was shut down in the US several of the stations had to run for a couple of years to fulfill treaty obligations with Canada.
3. Even for old guys like me it is hard to remember how much both the technology and the usage has changed. The duplex US channels were used by marine operators - I don't think there is a VHF marine operator left in the United States. So the channels go unused as there is no driving force (and of course the regulators don't have a clue - that is why they are regulators) to change them. :) LOL

Fair winds and following seas.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,184 Posts
So, I bought a 2100 a couple of years ago. Just now got a chartplotter for it. Problem is that the 2100 is not fully compatible with my chartplotter since the data rates for the NEMA 183 interface don't support my single NEMA 183 interface on my chartplotter.. the 2100 wants to send some data at low speed and other at high speed.

They made a software mod on the 2150 model to allow all data to operate at the same speed, which is good.

So I have to decide between AIS or DSC, which is disappointing.

the 2200 seems to be a better way to go, since the GPS is integral, and you only need one data connection.

So

I wish they would support NMEA 2000.. I would rather only have one network on my boat.

I expressed my frustration to a Standard Horizon rep at the boat show. He wasn't particularly sympathetic. He did think that they would eventually support NEMA 2000


My choices seem to me to be:

1) Just hookup one data connection to my chart plotter. No DSC
2) Sell my radio, and get a 2200
3) Get a dedicated transponder... (Maybe I really should be transmitting anyhow
4) Continue to sulk about this
I believe there is another option, which is to get an NMEA 0183 multiplexer.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,851 Posts
I believe there is another option, which is to get an NMEA 0183 multiplexer.
Thought about that.. I really don't want the expense or additional complications. Goal is to at least start out with a "clean" network. I can dirty it up later

Thanks, though...

Still sulking....
 
  • Like
Reactions: tdw
1 - 14 of 14 Posts
Top