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Has anybody used this brand of furler? I like the specs on this furler having owned a Famet furler which is a similar design. Simple and reliable. I have a Hood 800 series which is so over engineered that there are multiple points for future failure. Several sets of bearings and stress on tubes which cause failure, potential for halyard wrap, enclosed drum etc.. I had a Famet furler which was trouble free for over 20 years on my last boat but is no longer available.

ALADO - Furler and Roller - main page
 

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Corsair 24
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look up travlin easy(gary) he raves about his and the price is right
 

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The Alado has been rated by Practical Sailor magazine as the best system available today. No bearings to wear, no wear on the forestay, large drum, easy to install, easy to furl, built tough, and as stated above, the price is right. I've had two of them, one on a 27 Catalina and one on my 33 Morgan Out Island. Never had a problem of any kind.

Good Luck,

Gary :cool:
 

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We recently replaced our Famet with an Alado due to the similar simple design, and even better without all the screws in the extrusions. I did the installation by myself in about 1 hour. Quite pleased with it thus far, but have not used it extensively. We'll be heading to the Caribbean in about 3 months so we'll really work it then.
 

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We have the Alado on our Cat 30. We love it. The only issue I have with it is that the is no good way to attach the furler's halyard. You have to tie it off to the drum and wrop the excess. We have had it 5 years with no problems at all.
 

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One of my cutomers installed a Aldo on their Pearson 26.

They did have a major problem but it wasn't the Aldo's fault.
They didn't use two wrenches when following one of the steps to they managed to bird cage the forestry and when it let loose it made a major scary mess and they had to get the yard to finish the job.

I used the boat after it was done and it works fine.
 

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I run my furler halyard in a continuous loop, somewhat like a clothesline with a pully/small at the top of the drum. When I get the sail all the way to the top, I merely take a couple cable ties and tie the lines together. Works great. At the end of the season, I just snip the cable ties and the sail drops down.

Cheers,

Gary :cool:
 

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baDumbumbum
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The Alado has been rated by Practical Sailor magazine as the best system available today.
Not quite true, Gary. PS gives the Alado its Budget Buy recommendation and calls it "a good benchmark" among the four integral halyard furling units reviewed. But while it received Excellent marks for construction and ease of installation, performance was rated merely Good. To be expected for a unit with no ball bearings or easy luff tensioning ability.

PS reserved its highest praise for the top-swivel units from Selden (Furlex) and Harken (MkIV), which still outperform integral halyard units under sail. That performance advantage does entail the cost of complexity, more challenging installation, and ... well ... cost. The Selden is 3x the price of the Alado. The folks I know with Alados seem happy with their choice, which is all that matters.:)
 

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OK, what constitutes performance with a roller furling system? I kinda figured that it either worked or it didn't, but maybe there is something I'm missing here. I know the Alado furled a lot easier than those systems with smaller drums, which is only common sense. And, the overlapping foils eliminated the problems I saw with systems the used pins that often sheared or just fell out. Tell me about performance - I must have missed that when I read the article.

Gary :cool:
 

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The Alado has been rated by Practical Sailor magazine as the best system available today. No bearings to wear, no wear on the forestay, large drum, easy to install, easy to furl, built tough, and as stated above, the price is right. I've had two of them, one on a 27 Catalina and one on my 33 Morgan Out Island. Never had a problem of any kind.

Good Luck,

Gary :cool:
Ummmm...budget buy yes, but there are better engineered and performing furlers out there but you pay for it.

Of course you can have a great furler but none of this matters if the operator does not know how to use it. We recently witnessed an example of this with a Harken unit, it appeared the sail was jammed, the captain drove the boat into the slip before it was fixed? :eek: I would think its better to have done this prior to entering the slip? Just another example of poor seamanship I suppose. Another boat nearby lost their head sail due to several days of high winds and poor securing of their furler. :confused:
 

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Dave, I don't know about the engineering factor. I looked at a lot of roller furling systems before I purchased the Alado. Overall, the design and construction was far superior to systems I looked at that cost four times as much. I'm still trying to wrap my head around performance - but maybe I'm not to bright in that department.

Gary :cool:
 

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The Alado furler is almost idiot proof. I say almost because sometimes I am an idiot. Furling with inconsistent tension on the furling line can result in a crossed line in the drum. This can happen with any head sail furler, but the Alado is easy to fix; pull the sail out a bit then furl again but more carefully.

This winter I will be adding a bow sprit, so some changes to the head sail and the always reliable Alado.
 

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baDumbumbum
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Dave, I don't know about the engineering factor. I looked at a lot of roller furling systems before I purchased the Alado. Overall, the design and construction was far superior to systems I looked at that cost four times as much. I'm still trying to wrap my head around performance - but maybe I'm not to bright in that department.

Gary :cool:
Performance: Top-end systems have multiple courses of Torlon & Delrin ball bearings top and bottom; these make furling large headsails much easier, esp. in stronger winds on lower headings. The reason the Alado drum has to be so large is to compensate for the higher friction of a bushing. Ball bearings need to maintained more than bushings, but when clean, BBs perform better.

The Furlex, Facnor, and Harken furlers chosen by PS have independent tack swivels, which (combined with the head swivel) allow a certain degree of take-up lag in the sail corners. That means the middle of the sail begins rolling up first. You get better reefed sail shape w/out as much recourse to foam pads or rope luffs. Better sailing performance.

A top swivel/halyard combination gives much better control over luff tension -- and therefore draft depth and location -- than an integral halyard furler. You can tighten or ease the halyard on the fly, on a loaded sail, w/out going forward and fussing with the unit. For people who care about sail shape, halyard tension is a big deal. It's a performance advantage.

Look, Gary -- I own a CDI FF2 which uses an integral halyard like the Alado, but which lacks the Alado's metal foil extrusions. The CDI's PVC extrusion is not so good & tends to buckle under anything like sufficient luff tension. The Alado is a better furler than the CDI, but either is fine for many sailors who just want a turn-y thing to make the sail go in and out.

But there are real and substantial performance advantages to top-swivel furlers, and PS recognizes that fact. Maybe motoring up and down the ICW twice a year doesn't warrant the increased cost and complexity that attend top-swivel furlers; that's perfectly sensible; but the benefits are there for those sailors who care & understand how to exploit them. Just please do not claim a specific publication called a specific product "the best system available today" when in fact they said no such thing. PS rated the Selden/Furlex best performer overall; the Harken MkIV the best intersection of performance and cost; and the Alado & Z-Spar good bargain buys in their respective categories. Alado is probably the top dog of integral halyard furlers and will satisfy a large percentage of owners, but it is not the best furling system available.
 

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Ill be a devil here arguing performance when speaking furlers for run of the mill boats is really funny to me

unless you have mega bucks to spend and have sails that are custom cut for the specific furler you have arguing performance gains for 4-5 times the price of the alado furler is plain silly

unless of course you dont mind spending that money on such a system and can afford it

but say a mid 70-80s racer cruiser with any furler is going to perform within .25knot range depending on what furler you opt to have

cruising go for longevity and reliabilty and yes easy replacements of parts...the less the better

REALLY

say the alado goes 7 knots top of the line will make you go 7.25knots

is that worth the cost to you? if it is go ahead!

like gary I think furlers should be bought for what they are...convenient.

now this isnt saying code zeros on flexible furlers arent fantastic or the newest thing out there but im not seing where that is relevant to this thread or question.

btw gary I really appreciate this vids you sent me and posted on the 500 thread a long time ago

if anyone is interested they are there to see...installation is a breeze

my experience with furlers are I loved the profurl older ones, some harkens(on smaller boats) and custom made french ones on boats Ive been on...

the alado tickled my mind for my old islander 36
 
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