SailNet Community banner

1 - 13 of 13 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
65 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello all,
We might have the opportunity to purchase an Alberg 30 Odyssey, and were hoping to get some expert opinions (that means you, Sailnet forumites) on the pros and cons of this boat. Be reminded that the "Odyssey" is different from the more common Alberg 30. The brief history we've found (we've already done all the google searching), is that the Odyssey was actually built to Carl Alberg's original design specs and scantlings, as opposed to the Alberg 30 which were altered by the manufacturer to cut costs. Main differences we've come across so far are that the displacement is about 1000 lbs greater in the Odyssey, it has external lead ballast as opposed to internal iron, and has a flat coachroof, as opposed to stepped. Any firsthand experience, secondhand legends, rumors and/or hearsay would be much appreciated. thanks
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,280 Posts
Not a deal-maker or breaker, but all other factors being equal, take the lead ballast over the lighter-weight iron.
When it comes to working on old Albergs, there are a few great sites that cater to their specific problems and solutions.

FWIW, if you'd consider that boat from that era, you might want to keep your eyes open for an Ericson 30-1 or the blue-water-proven Yankee 30.

Cheers,
L
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,474 Posts
How tall are you? The Odyssey's unstepped coachroof cuts down on the cabin height.

Unless it was built in Whitby, it ain't an Alberg 30, and unless it was built in California in the 50s it ain't a real Odyssey, so be careful.

Be careful about the fourth- hand opinions of why a design is changed- the ballast change may have been to save cost or, just as likely, because the boat didn't need the extra half ton of weight with a shorter rig and lower draft, which based on the 30s venerable history, seems to have been a wise move.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
65 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Olson34, Do you know if the Ericson 30-1 has a spade rudder or a skeg hung rudder? And Yankees are high on our list, if we saw the right one pop up, we'd jump on it just as fast. So far, the ones we've seen have been just a little out of our price range.

BLJones, good point on the coachroof height. I'm about 6', so we'll have to check on that. ...They say it was built in San Francisco, though in 1969. SailboatData.com lists the Odysseys as being wood hulls as well, which this one isn't. And you're right, I think it's technically an (Alberg designed) Odyssey 30, which by all accounts was the precursor design to the venerable Alberg 30.

And I forgot, this particular Odyssey is also a yawl. Any thoughts on the merits/demerits of this rig on a 30' boat?

Thanks for all the input.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,280 Posts
The E-31-1 has a partial skeg. Friend of mine is restoring one. Seems to be very well built.
I found a pic of one with a quick google search. If you have questions, put up a thread over @ ericsonyachts.org. Several owners of that model check in regularly.

FWIW, I would worry less about the design choice for the rudder than just finding a well-designed and well-built boat.
For instance, the Bob Smith-designed Cascade 29 has a fin keel and a spade rudder, and various owners have gone 'round the world many times in many of them.
Like the larger Cascades, it has an honestly "bullet proof" layup (the shop used to have a piece of hull laminate with the 30-06 slug embedded in it to show customers) and every part was "over built".

Best,
LB
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
65 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Duly noted on the rudder setup. We've read so many places about the pros of a protected rudder, but then we've heard just as many people reiterate what you just said "pick a well built and well designed boat." ...We recently came across an Ericson 35 Mk1 (Alberg designed). Any thoughts or experience on that one?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,796 Posts
The Sailing Channel used to have a series of videos showing a "This Old Boat" kind of program where they were working on the Alberg 30. I don't know if its still up, but here is the link if you want to look.

TheSailingChannel

Mr. Alberg designed beautiful boats, but in some respects, they suffer in comparison to their more modern counterparts. I have never sailed on an Alberg 30, although I have been on the Pearson Alberg 35, and a couple of other Alberg designs. The ones I have been on were tender, backed up like beasts, and were dark and cramped below. And going dead downwind, they were balky.

Don't get me wrong, I love the boats. After the initial heeling, they stiffen up nicely, you can avoid sailing dead downwind, and I never spend much time below anyway. With practice, you can get them to back up in a predicable if not docile manner. And I don't need to tell you that they are simply beautiful.

The yawl rig on these smaller boats is an outgrowth of the CCA rule that basically gave you extra sail area with no penalty under the ratings rule. There was really no need to split up the sail area for ease of handling; IMHO the main and jib on a thirty foot sloop are not so big or difficult to handle as to justify the extra cost and maintenance of another mast, rigging and sail. Most yawls of that size that I see never set the mizzen unless they are on a long beam reach; the sail is almost useless when beating into the wind, and is worse than useless off the wind. They do make a nice windvane when anchored.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
65 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I seem to recall Jeff H describing the Alberg 30 as a CCA rule beater, and that kind of turns me off, just knowing that when Carl was at the drafting table, the "best possible design" was being balanced with "how to beat the rule." Thanks for the thoughts on the yawl rig. I like the idea of the windvane at anchor, but we don't need a whole mast to make that happen, given that all that extra rigging means more parts to replace and more $. We're still waiting on some more details to trickle in on this boat, but we've since also gotten a line on an Ericson Alberg 35. We don't know much about it yet, so we're refraining from excitement, but do you have any thoughts on that one? thanks
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,796 Posts
we've since also gotten a line on an Ericson Alberg 35. We don't know much about it yet, so we're refraining from excitement, but do you have any thoughts on that one? thanks
I have been on a Pearson Alberg 35. I didn't know there was an Ericson Alberg 35. I just read the link provided by mitiempo about the Ericson's story. In any case, the two boats sure look similar. These boats are not particularly fast or manuverable by today's standards, and their accomodations below are certainly less comfortable at anchor. However, they sail beautifully, especially in boisterous conditions. And "cozy" cabin is an advantage when you are trying to function below in any kind of weather; handholds everywhere, everything close at hand, and if you do fall, you can't go far. This is not a rationalization for the small cabin; it is a purposeful design feature. And the boat is beautiful.

If you sail in an area where you need to motor in close quarters (especially backing up), and/or an area where light winds predominate, I wouldn't go for an Alberg design. It just wouldn't be fun for me, no matter how much my heart palpitates at the sight of that sheer line and those overhangs. However, if you're on a mooring and you get some wind on a regular basis, then I think it could be a terrific value and a really nice boat.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
21 Posts
Well, I have firsthand experience: I owned one of the SF Bay built Alberg Odyssey 30 Yawls. It was built in '69, as I recall. It was a heavy sucker, at 10 or 11,000 lbs, if memory serves. I remember cutting a hole for a deck fitting when I added a small holding tank-I think it was just shy of 2" thick. Built in the early days of FG, and I think it is generally accepted that manufacturers overbuilt then. It obviously loved heavy air, and didn't do so well in light air. It had a full keel, and was fine in close quarters maneuvering. Mine had a self-tending jib, and didn't point really well. It liked two people to sail her, due to how she was rigged. She did have wheel steering too.

The coach roof didn't have the large rear ports that most Albergs have, and was quite attractive. I painted mine beige up top and dark green on the hull-with tons of teak trim, i got compliments everywhere i went, after spending a year restoring the cosmetics after she sat for 5 years. The prior owner single handed her down to the S. Pac twice, and then quit sailing due to age.

While the cabin was cozy, there was all kinds of storage. Ventilation was only really via the main hatch and the hatch over the v berth, and a couple of dorades.

She had an Albin diesel which was hard to get parts for back in the early 90's! I remember the pirate in FL who had the parts biz locked up-I think impellers for the water pump were $80 then. I ended up machining some stuff to aid in refurbing the engine.

All in all, it was a fun boat, and it was my first non-trailer sailer. Those were fun days, and life was simpler then.

If you have any more specific questions, please let me know.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
21 Posts
Oh, PS: I'm 6'2", and I managed fine around the boat. I hit my head, toes, shins, elbows all other appendages constantly on whatever boat I am on. This was no worse than any other I've had. :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
Just googled my boat and came across this thread so thought I'd shed some light. We have owned a 1969 Alberg Odyssey for a four years and have sailed throughout the SF Bay Area, and along the coast to and through the Channel Islands and So Cal.

Fewer than 20 were built. Of these, at least four have cruised internationally, including one circumnavigation and numerous South Pacific circuits.

Headrooom is 6'2" in the main cabin, more under hatches (I'm 6'3", so this matters). Many seem to have Albin diesels- ours does, and continues to run well and sip fuel. Easy to work on and hand-crankable. Pretty much all parts are available from Albinmotor in Sweden, who continues to manufacture parts as needed. These remain popular motors in Europe.

Anyone with questions can feel free to contact me. We think they're wonderful boats, solid and very well mannered. We would love to get more information about sisterships, and have some build literature to share.
 
1 - 13 of 13 Posts
Top