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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Greetings,
I use denatured alcohol for my stove and oven. The metal cans tend to rust and that can't be too good.....
I have not found it in plastic containers... or are these incompatible.

-How do you store your alcohol fuel onboard???

Your comments....:confused:
 

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Special Delivery
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Plastic containers should be fine for alcohol. Remember that the flame will be nearly invisible. I still remember my mother setting the curtains on fire about 45 years ago.
 

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Tartan 27' owner
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Ethanol alcohol can absorb water which would explain your metal cans rusting.
Plastic does not rust nearly as much if at all.
Go with the flow and enjoy.
 

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Cal 9.2 SilverSwan
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I also used gallon metal cans of denatured alcohol for my Kenon stove. The bottom of the can would leave rust rings in the storage locker. I always kept the lid on tight to prevent moisture absorption. I would decant into quart cans for easier handling and that also would prevent me from having to open the main gallon container as much. This year I converted to a Force 10 propane stove to avoid the dreaded flare up when starting.
 

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I got lucky and my boat came with a gallon of alcohol in a plastic container. I want to think that it was Origo alcohol but I will have to look at it again to make sure. Anyway, the metal cans that I buy alcohol in at Lowes or Home Depot are terrible to pour out of as it spills, etc. so I pour the metal container into the plastic one and throw the metal one away. I'm sure if you found any kind of plastic jug with a well secured, screw on lid that didn't leak, it would work fine.
 

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When the West Marine stores used to carry boat stove alcohol it came in plastic containers. Any sturdy plastic container will be fine.
 

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It takes no time for the Lowes alcohol can to rust and leave a nearly impossible to get off stain on non-skid. Made that mistake the first can I bought and let it sit in the cockpit for a day and when I picked it up it left a brown spot that I have yet to get off. I tried CLR and a couple of other things and the stain is still there.
 

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When you buy it in the drug store it comes in plastic bottles.
 

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I've used those metal "spirits" cans for many things over the years. Wash it down with detergent, scuff it up if you want, then hit it with whatever old cans of spray paint or primer are about to go out of date.

A couple of coats of paint prevents rust for a long time. If you want to be yachty, prime it, paint it white (for brightness) then paint it red and stencil "FLAMMABLE!" on it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Well I gather from the responses that with a plastic container there is no problem with the container melting down.... how about osmotic forces?
Just kiding (eventhough that can be a possibility).
I have an non pressurized stove and have not had any problems nor the flareups some have mentioned. It might be a bit slow but I feel safer than using propane.
I use the small canisters for the BBQ, but even those I leave attached since I have had some that would continue to leak after initial use.

Thank you for all the responses.
 

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I like the idea of using out dated paint as a corrosion deterrant on metal cans. Just a thought...why not run a bead of silicone around the bottom lip of the can (assuming it's new and rust free). Now you have a can that will not create rust stains while being stored but will be "slide" resistant as well.
 

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I suspect the older the bottle, the better.

In the last 2-3 years I've had three bottles of brand name detergent/cleaner split or leak, I suspect that in order to maintain profits the makers have been literally making the bottles thinner and thinner.

Not so long ago they were good enough to use as floats and markers "forever".

Although I've also noticed that solvents, especially alcohol, will embrittle many plastics after a while. I think I'd stick to metal for the flammables.
 
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