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I am starting this thread for people who have seen the movie and want to discuss it...so there will be spoilers in it. If you dont want it spoiled..stop reading now.....
 

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Saw the movie the other night and yes there are flaws and I am glad...the wife was in tears and at one point said, "I will never go out in the Ocean again...". I reminded her that the guy was making tons of mistakes and that lead to his situation....

The first thing was his lack of equipment on board...We don't know the time do we? Was it current time or 1980's? If not current that would account for his lack of electronics, like say a solar panel?

Where was he going? Even after the container hit, he seemed like he was not in any rush to get to his destination. Never under full sail after the first 5 minutes of the movie.

Storm Jib? Correct me if I am wrong, but how was he going to hoist the storm jib when he was using a furler for his jib? Wouldnt he have to take down the sail off the furler first? and in a storm like that? Couldnt he have simply unfurled his jib a few feet?

Shaving?

Discuss....
 

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This is probably the 3rd or 4th thread on the movie so a lot has been discussed already. ;)

I think that first of all we need to recognize that this is a movie intended to entertain. Watching a well prepared sailor make all the right decisions whilst sailing a properly outfitted boat for a couple of hours isn't going to be that much fun to watch unless you're really into sailing.

And like all movies it compresses hours and days into seconds and minutes. It's impossible to capture all the details we sailors might consider important and at the same time tell a compelling story within those constraints.

So given the above I'm going to assume that we're supposed to view "Our Man" as a competent sailor who calmly (more or less) deals with the situations he finds himself in. But even he has his limits and as things go from bad to worse he eventually reaches a breaking point.

The shaving sequence is merely showing us that even in the face of danger he just goes about his business. Or maybe he is nervous and just needs to keep busy. In this movie more than any other I've seen we're left to fill in the blanks. But I'm thinking the shaving scene is supposed to further impress upon us his calm demeanor.

Personally, if I had woken up to water rushing into the boat I would be freaking out big time and shoving anything I could find into that hole. Maybe I would have gone topsides first to see what the hell it was and if I could get it loose (I'm thinking it wouldn't take a sea anchor or drogue). Once I realized that I could keep the water from coming in by sailing on the opposite tack I certainly would not be turning around like he did to revisit the shipping container.

But then again, I'm not a Blue Water sailor and further I'd have no idea how much water that boat could take on before it was really in trouble. He seemed to not be overly concerned.
 

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I think there was a baby stay for the storm jib. Since there were no cutaways to show anything, much is left to the imagination.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I know it's a movie. But I for one know I can learn what NOT to do in such situations. Instead of saying. Oh it's a movie. I won't look at it for any sailing information.
 

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As strange as it may seem, I'm becoming more enamored with the movie as time goes on.

I just read another review of it on Huffington Post and I was again left scratching my head wondering if there are multiple endings being shown in different locations. The reviewer's take on what ultimately happened to "Our Man" is clearly different than mine.

But there is only one ending and it turns out there's a lot of disagreement on what people think happened to "Our Man". The writer knows that and is happy about it.

The Huffington Post reviewer took the whole movie to be a rather sad commentary on the human condition even though he enjoyed the movie. I didn't see the movie in that light at all. So really I'm wondering if the story isn't so much about "Our Man" as ourselves. People seem to provide their own back story to the movie and how they interpret what happens during the film is based on that context.

So for those of you who haven't seen it, I'll just say this. A lot of people think he clearly died. A lot of people think he clearly lived.
 

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Kynntana (Freedom 38)
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So for those of you who haven't seen it, I'll just say this. A lot of people think he clearly died. A lot of people think he clearly lived.
I haven't seen it yet but plan to and don't mind the spoilers or alternate ways of thinking about his fate. This kinda reminds me of Out in the Wild. Friends from Alaska were very dismissive of this kid who just walked into the Alaskan wilderness unprepared. Others were supportive of his motives as a seeker of everything life has to offer. I was a disappointed by the ending that said something like, humans are not meant to die alone. As someone who enjoys doing things alone, it made me think that our perceptions of these movies can be warped by our own motives and desires. So now I'm going to try to keep an open mind when I see this movie and (maybe) keep my biases and fears in check.
 

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I know it's a movie. But I for one know I can learn what NOT to do in such situations. Instead of saying. Oh it's a movie. I won't look at it for any sailing information.
Oh I agree.

Some sailers seem to get upset about the movie because it doesn't accurately depict the equipment that would be at his disposal or what one would do in the situations that "Our Man" gets in. That's all I meant.
 

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I haven't seen it yet but plan to and don't mind the spoilers or alternate ways of thinking about his fate. This kinda reminds me of Out in the Wild. Friends from Alaska were very dismissive of this kid who just walked into the Alaskan wilderness unprepared. Others were supportive of his motives as a seeker of everything life has to offer. I was a disappointed by the ending that said something like, humans are not meant to die alone. As someone who enjoys doing things alone, it made me think that our perceptions of these movies can be warped by our own motives and desires. So now I'm going to try to keep an open mind when I see this movie and (maybe) keep my biases and fears in check.
Exactly. If you're a highly gregarious sort, the idea of spending a few weeks on a boat alone in the middle of an ocean probably seems like some sort of self imposed purgatory.

To me it would be an adventure. An opportunity to recharge. I'd rather die out there having lived a full life than rot away in some nursing home having family come visit out of a sense of obligation.
 

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I know it's a movie. But I for one know I can learn what NOT to do in such situations. Instead of saying. Oh it's a movie. I won't look at it for any sailing information.
If you really want to learn more about what to do when things go wrong, eschew Hollywood and go to YouTube for "boat crash test". What you learn the will be infinitely more valuable than what you can get from a Hollywood movie.
This movie sounds like the peckerwood commercial. Unrealistic. It didn't show here so can't say for sure.
John
 

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I love Redford and I love sailing but frankly the movie was disappointing. Not sure why but it hit me as flat or thin in terms of telling a story.
 

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I saw it just yesterday (finally found a local theatre showing it, yay!). I enjoyed it. To me, it seemed like he wasn't proactive about anything. He waited until the SHTF and then reacted which is a no-no.
 
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