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Discussion Starter #1
Hi All,

Since we got our boat in September, we've been slowly going through things and one of the items was getting the survival equipment (required and not) up to speed. This Captain has learned that if the Admiral feels safe... more better. know what I mean?

We had your run of the mill Sterns life vests, but got a couple of WM's inshore auto/manual inflatable vests, a new LifeSling2, all new flairs, shells and an orange distress flag and finally yesterday a Revere Coastal Compact life raft. I think we're set. (Inshore sailing Puget Sound).

I know we all have the survival gear that we think we need. I was raised military and in that area there's almost "never to much".

What do you have beyond the CG requirements?
 

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I don't discuss my member
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PLB registered to myself. I crew on other boats and race my own, it's nice to know that in the middle of the ocean, bobbing around in my vest, boots, foulies, etc. at night, that I can push a button and someone knows where I am.

EPIRB for the boat is nice, but an EPIRB for me is even better. I also use an ORC compliant tether and am lucky enough to race with folks that appreciate the importance of good safety equipment.
 

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We carry the bare legal minimum here in the San Juan's. Our money is better spent on boat maintenance and charts. Since it sounds like you are new here let me give you one simple piece of advice. DON'T go anywhere without a paper chart in your cockpit. Welcome to the best cruising grounds in the world my friend, hope to see you out there :)
 

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Discussion Starter #4
DON'T go anywhere without a paper chart in your cockpit. Welcome to the best cruising grounds in the world my friend, hope to see you out there :)
Concur, charts on board, hand held marine GPS backup, old handheld GPS for position only after that and an i-phone with a GPS marine app after that. The boat (short of an HF radio and radar) is big water capable as far as instruments and gear. I might have more than most just for a nice long day sail. Just wondering what other sailors have.
 

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Old enough to know better
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Binoculars, as much for wildlife viewing as anything but good for identifying boat/ship names and buoys.

Flash lights, lots of flashlights. I like to have a few bright ones, and some lower output that do not destroy your night vision. The small squeeze lights that come on key chains are nice because they are bright and have a fairly focused beam, and can hang off just about anything. No need to be more than a few feet from one hanging from something.

Keep your old out of date flairs as backup.

Comfortable life vests for guests, including children's sizes. I like some of the ones designed for Kayaking, as they give you lots of free movement. Zippers are good too as they really encourage people to use them if they are easy to put on and comfortable. Your guests will appreciate not having to use stinky orange vests.

Extra fire extinguishers, every space should have one. One in each stateroom, salon, galley and one in a locker in the cockpit.

Large first aid kit.

Some harnesses, in case of rough weather.
 

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whistle on each PFD, paddles for docking under engine and wind failure, ditch bag with handheld VHF radio and GPS, plugs for every through hull.
 

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Already mentioned, but I think one of the new handheld VHF radios with built in GPS and DSC is a great idea, can be used by guests with very little teaching, float, small enough to keep on your person at all times.
 

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Master Mariner
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I am constantly amazed by the amount of money and worry so many on here put into safety equipment.
Sailing is statistically the safest sport going, as far as I can tell, and yet discussions of safety equipment is one of the biggest topics. Sailing is not rocket science; man has been doing it for well over 2 centuries. It's easy; you just have to beg, borrow or rent a small sailboat, say 8 to 10'. Take it out on a s mall body of water on a nice day and put up a sail. Tip it over a few dozen times and voila, you will know how to sail at the end of the day.
I can't even comprehend how anyone could have a pleasant day on the water, on any boat over 26', wearing a lifejacket, or as some have stated; their lifejackets are laid out on the salon table for easy access for the duration of the sail.
Relax a bit. You might actually reach a top speed of 8 or 9 miles an hour! There are no roads, stop lights, telephone poles, etc to crash into. Even if you crash into the rocks, a reef or a shoal, generally, if you stick with the boat, you'll survive.
Most of us sail within sight of numerous other boats and well within the reach of commercial assistance, or in a dire emergency, the USCG (or a Coast Guard).
Sure, bad things happen, but if you think things through, act in an intelligent fashion and maintain your vessel properly, they happen a lot less often.
If you've got a 9' (or larger) inflatable with a good outboard, why would you feel the need for a liferaft, as a coastal sailor? Wouldn't you prefer to jump into something that will get you back to shore, rather than sit in a raft depending on someone else to save you? A few gallons of gas and a jerry jug are a lot cheaper than a liferaft, and more useful, IMO.
I've often been accused of being too blase' about all this, with half a century of experience as a mariner, and I take no exception to that. If the boat is heeling to the point you think you should put on a safety harness, reef. If you are still uncomfortable, take down a sail. If even that is beyond your (or those with you) comfort zone, take all the sails down and motor home. There's always another day.
But I sincerely believe a day on the water should be fun, not fraught with worry and what if's.
 

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For the PNW a good wool hat. Forget the fancy yachtie rubber boots, get a pair of fishing gum boots. Stay warm!
 

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I can't even comprehend how anyone could have a pleasant day on the water, on any boat over 26', wearing a lifejacket
In the PNW for about half of the year the lifejacket's primary duty is keeping me warm, a secondary duty is keeping me alive if I fall in the water.

Good ones aren't uncomfortable. Those awful orange vests are.
 

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Wearing a Mustang self inflating vest over what ever else you got on is a good idea. Comfortable so you don't notice it. If it goes off it's because you're in the chuck. Then you've got 20 minutes or so . After that it makes finding the body easier. Keeping your wits together under a good Cowichan wool tuque helps avoiding errors in judgment.
 

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"a good Cowichan wool tuque"

Can we get a picture of this one?
 

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Kynntana (Freedom 38)
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Do you know whether the Life Sling has the blocks to work as a hoist, as intended? Mine had the gear in the bag, but someone told me that it used to need to be purchased separately, and you wouldn't know that unless you pull all the line out and check. One thing I plan to do is test it by hoisting someone off the dock though I'm pretty sure with my swim platform that would not be necessary unless they were unconscious and then there'd be whole other problems to consider. What about jacklines and a place to tether in the cockpit, especially if you're traveling at night? The offshore waters where I sail are typically 50 deg F, so if you're not back on the boat within an hour, you're probably dead. Usually there's no other boater close enough to help either.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
I am constantly amazed by the amount of money and worry so many on here put into safety equipment.
Sailing is statistically the safest sport going, as far as I can tell, and yet discussions of safety equipment is one of the biggest topics. Sailing is not rocket science; man has been doing it for well over 2 centuries. It's easy; you just have to beg, borrow or rent a small sailboat, say 8 to 10'. Take it out on a s mall body of water on a nice day and put up a sail. Tip it over a few dozen times and voila, you will know how to sail at the end of the day.
I can't even comprehend how anyone could have a pleasant day on the water, on any boat over 26', wearing a lifejacket, or as some have stated; their lifejackets are laid out on the salon table for easy access for the duration of the sail.
Relax a bit. You might actually reach a top speed of 8 or 9 miles an hour! There are no roads, stop lights, telephone poles, etc to crash into. Even if you crash into the rocks, a reef or a shoal, generally, if you stick with the boat, you'll survive.
Most of us sail within sight of numerous other boats and well within the reach of commercial assistance, or in a dire emergency, the USCG (or a Coast Guard).
Sure, bad things happen, but if you think things through, act in an intelligent fashion and maintain your vessel properly, they happen a lot less often.
If you've got a 9' (or larger) inflatable with a good outboard, why would you feel the need for a liferaft, as a coastal sailor? Wouldn't you prefer to jump into something that will get you back to shore, rather than sit in a raft depending on someone else to save you? A few gallons of gas and a jerry jug are a lot cheaper than a liferaft, and more useful, IMO.
I've often been accused of being too blase' about all this, with half a century of experience as a mariner, and I take no exception to that. If the boat is heeling to the point you think you should put on a safety harness, reef. If you are still uncomfortable, take down a sail. If even that is beyond your (or those with you) comfort zone, take all the sails down and motor home. There's always another day.
But I sincerely believe a day on the water should be fun, not fraught with worry and what if's.
Capta,

Never were in the military were you? OK in order, as I feel compelled to concur with your blase' view of safety equipment and it's need.

Indeed, man has been sailing since biblical times... and drowning.

Safety equipment is a big topic, one worth while reading. One life lost due to ignorance is one to many. (Remember this forum can be an educational tool).

The topic was not about learning how to sail, it was about what kind of emergency equipment you carry.

Just because you can't see wearing a vest doesn't mean that anyone else feels the same way.

Speed has nothing to do with any amount of safety gear on the boat.

I don't tow a dingy or have one on davits, but I do have a raft. Your degree of feeling safe is different from other folk, and that's OK. I really don't get where you can say to anyone we aren't having fun on the water because we have a life vest nearby??? You might have 50 years on the water, hold a Captain everything license, but you are no different than anyone else on the planet. You know... "s**t happens" and when it does, it doesn't generaly care who it happens to.

I guess my last point would be "peace of mind". If my wife who is 56 years old and not a strong swimmer feels safer knowing there is a raft on board and will go cruising... by golly I 'm getting a raft!

Dave
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Do you know whether the Life Sling has the blocks to work as a hoist, as intended? Mine had the gear in the bag, but someone told me that it used to need to be purchased separately, and you wouldn't know that unless you pull all the line out and check. One thing I plan to do is test it by hoisting someone off the dock though I'm pretty sure with my swim platform that would not be necessary unless they were unconscious and then there'd be whole other problems to consider. What about jacklines and a place to tether in the cockpit, especially if you're traveling at night? The offshore waters where I sail are typically 50 deg F, so if you're not back on the boat within an hour, you're probably dead. Usually there's no other boater close enough to help either.
I have some diver buddies at work and one of them is going to go out with us and jump in and let us try and fish him out with and without the block and tackle, by hand, up the stern ladder and not. Nothing beats the real world Hands on training.
 

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landofrainandgray
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We took the Lifesling class offered at our local sailing club and it was the most worthwhile day-we got to go out on our own boat and use the Lifesling and tackle in a real world situation. And, we're signed up for the Safety at Sea seminar in February. I love preparation as much as I love to sail! To each his own, I suppose.
 

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islander bahama 24
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If Josh Slocum had all our safety gear available he would say no thanks humans have been sailing without it for ten thousand years I think he would have said give me everything you got. May never need it but just in case. BTW my sterns float coat also looks good on the town and keeps me warm and head above water.
 

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i would - especially in coastal waters - have some sort of emergency rudder, or at least anything to convert to an emergency rudder in a hurry prepared...

we had once in a tight passage between two rocky and steep shorelines a rudder failure... we avoided getting smashed against the rocks by sheer luck...
that was not a nice experience!

edit and btw:
you know that guy who survived in a life raft for 76 days alone, drifting across the atlantic?

he had his survival gear sorted out and ready, i can tell you that! ;)
 

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i carry life raft ,epirb,& immersion suits ,these items are required on commercial fishing vessels.thats why i bought them.even 20 miles offshore these items give comfort to scared crew in gale conditions,on a small boat.big,strong guys drown every year up in the gulf of maine including friends of mine.dont be cheap.be prepared if your gonna play off the continental shelf
 

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Sailing is not rocket science; man has been doing it for well over 2 centuries.
actually, a lot longer than that.


I can't even comprehend how anyone could have a pleasant day on the water, on any boat over 26', wearing a lifejacket, or as some have stated; their lifejackets are laid out on the salon table for easy access for the duration of the sail.
Clearly you have never sailed in poor or challenging conditions.

If you've got a 9' (or larger) inflatable with a good outboard, why would you feel the need for a liferaft, as a coastal sailor? Wouldn't you prefer to jump into something that will get you back to shore, rather than sit in a raft depending on someone else to save you?
Clearly you have never attempted to motor into a large sea or high winds. In some cases you can't even do it in a 35'+ yacht, you sure as hell can't do it in a 9' dinghy with an outboard.

... with half a century of experience as a mariner...
Years on the water don't make you a smarter or more skilled sailor.

If you are still uncomfortable, take down a sail. If even that is beyond your (or those with you) comfort zone, take all the sails down and motor home.
Have you ever been offshore? Again, with this concept of motoring home... And if the motor sucks in some dirt? Transmission problems? shifter linkage? Overheating? **** happens. I'd rather be prepared.
 
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