SailNet Community banner

1 - 20 of 24 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
So, I have a Catalina 30 with original 1980 standard wire rigging. I know the usual replacement program for this rigging is about 10 years but I am curious as to everyone's thoughts about sailing in San Francisco bay with rigging of this condition. When evaluating the rigging I have noticed multiple areas of the wire mid length that has some corrosion build up. Also around the clevis pins and swages there is some brown rust that has developed. There are currently no obvious cracks in the swages and the turnbuckles and screws appear to be sound as well. Just this brown rust around the T-toggles and other areas. Here are some photos to give you an idea. Thanks for any advice that can be given...good/bad.

CHEERS!
 

Attachments

·
no longer reading SailNet
Joined
·
2,309 Posts
If that were my boat I'd replace the rigging. I'm not a professional rigger, but crevice corrosion in the bottom swages would make me very nervous.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
845 Posts
If your wire rope looks that bad on the outside i can't imagine what it looks like on the inside; especially inside the lower swages.

I would replace when able.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
5,921 Posts
Agree with replacing it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,264 Posts
I can't tell from the pictures if what I am seeing is pulled strands or rust, but frankly I wouldn't sail that boat until she is re rigged. It isn't just the swags and wire, the mast tangs look pretty bad, and I have to wonder about the fittings on the mast crane as well.
 

·
Registered
Corsair 24
Joined
·
4,594 Posts
I see a crack on the pin for the pulley you have in the pic

I also see crusty rust in the second wire pic...

the tangs look fine

you choice

you can re rig a few wires at a time...no prob...whatever is needed more urgently of course going all new at once is best

avoid replacing with cheap new stuff...sometimes old and shabby looking is better off than some crap sold these days..
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,857 Posts
I would replace it before sailing. It looks 34 years old. I would suggest you hire a professional rigger to inspect the entire rig - wire, tangs, and the mast itself.

A sailor died in San Francisco a few days ago from a falling mast - albeit in different circumstances. It isn't worth the risk.
 

·
Daniel - Norsea 27
Joined
·
1,258 Posts
When I bought my boat a couple years ago, my rigging looked the same. One connection even had a few cracks with one completely open. I replaced myself using Hi-Mod fittings. It all went together fairly easily. Cost was around $1400 or so, if I remember correctly.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
712 Posts
My Allmand is a 1979 and I just replaced all my standing rigging. It looked just like yours. You get used to looking at it and don't really "see" how bad it's possibly getting. When the rigger brought the new stuff to me, it was like WOW, how was I considering not replacing 35 year old wire. We did find flattened strands under the roller furler at the top of the forestay. You possibly will not see any bad spots up high until you take it down.

So Here's a bump from me to replace the rigging.
 

·
Registered
Corsair 24
Joined
·
4,594 Posts
op

here are some pics of what similar looking wire and terminals can look like after just slightly bending them or taking them off





the last pic the swage turnbuckle cracked right under the swage...in my hands
closed turnbuckles suck btw
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
712 Posts
Dave,
If/when you do it, please be sure to share the details!
I'm taking pictures as I go along. The mast goes back on Saturday. The rigger (who I hired to install a new head stay into the roller furler and get me all new standing rigging) has finished the furler and delivered all the standing rigging. I can post pictures here with a story or IM you (since we have the same boat). :)

Dave
 

·
Daniel - Norsea 27
Joined
·
1,258 Posts

·
Registered
Corsair 24
Joined
·
4,594 Posts
thats quite a failure man!

details?

edit I see the furler issue...furlers are notorious for placing unwanted loads and severely diminshing the life of the forestay(and hardware) on most installations...

ots for this reason that I see most furler installations and riggers recomended a more frequent check and replacement of the forestay on such installations

something on the order of twice as often
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
170 Posts
I replaced all the standing rigging on my CnC 26 2 seasons ago.
All new swaged on fittings and turnbuckles - $1,200 the lot.
A 30 footer can't be that much more.
My old shrouds and stays looked a lot better than yours, but the boat was 30+ years old and I had no idea if it had ever been replaced.
I sleep better now!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,705 Posts
I am a professional rigger, you need to replace it. 35 years is well past it's useful life.
So as a pro rigger may I ask you this:

Is it only about age or about condition too?

My rigging looks great, no visible corrosion, just some light tarnishing on the bottle screws and the wire still gleams. Everywhere. All the bottle screws are open and the threaded bits of the ends are visible and no signs of corrosion. I also loosened them one by one to seal the chain plates and under the bottle screws the threads all still looked great.

But as far as I can tell the whole rig is now 25 years old (on the assumption that it is original).

Is the age reason enough to be nervous?
 

·
I don't discuss my member
Joined
·
2,557 Posts
So as a pro rigger may I ask you this:

Is it only about age or about condition too?

My rigging looks great, no visible corrosion, just some light tarnishing on the bottle screws and the wire still gleams. Everywhere. All the bottle screws are open and the threaded bits of the ends are visible and no signs of corrosion. I also loosened them one by one to seal the chain plates and under the bottle screws the threads all still looked great.

But as far as I can tell the whole rig is now 25 years old (on the assumption that it is original).

Is the age reason enough to be nervous?
Short answer, YES.

Long answer, it depends, like everything else. But at 25 years old I'd replace it. Heck, I'd replace all standing rigging at 20 years old, no exceptions. Stainless steel rigging is very hard to determine whether it will fail or not. Very small cracks or hidden corrosion can cause a failure in what appears to be solid rigging.

In some places they recommend 10-15 years in the tropics, saltwater environment. That's pretty good. In brackish you can stretch it to 15-17ish if the boat is lightly used. In fresh water, up north, you can get 20. But even then, that's if it looks great. If the boat is in a windy venue, (Australia as opposed to the Chesapeake) then that will shorten the life. There are no hard and fast rules. Sometimes a rig tune that won't hold is a good indicator that the wires are slowing giving it up.

Moral of the story, if you think it should be done, do it. And I'm not saying that just b/c I'm a rigger. 1200-2500-or even $10,000 is very cheap insurance when you start pricing out new masts and installation costs for an appropriate size rig. Not to mention the damage to the furler, mainsail or halyard, electrical, etc. Better to prevent it from failing all together. But I still run into owners that want to save a few bucks, not replace a turn buckle with new wire. I also meet people who say my rigging has worked for 30 years, so it's probably good to go. The things people try and justify never ceases to amaze me. :eek:
 

·
Freedom isn't free
Joined
·
3,057 Posts
Those pictures make me feel much better about MY standing rigging, and I had mine slated for replacement this year.. (if my numbers are correct, my standing rigging is around 8 years old).
 

·
Wingnut
Joined
·
70 Posts
As much as I love stainless steel, I will always go with galvanized rigging wire.
For a few reasons...
1. Its stronger.
2. its cheaper.
3. its easier to swage/pour properly
4. It's much more likley to give indications before catastrrophic failure.

Same stuff they use for telephone poles. and for a good reason.
 
1 - 20 of 24 Posts
Top