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I just purchased an old IOR boat, a Chance 30-30 built by Allied boats. I've found quite a bit of information online but hopefully looking to find someone else who owns one and has some hand on experience with these boats. Was told by the previous owner that it was raced extensively when new, and I have a few news articles and 12 sails to suggest that this was probably true. Anyways, any info on these boats would be greatly appreciated! :)
 

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I actually tried to message him since I found some pictures of his boat, but my post count isn't high enough for that.
 

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Post a bunch of stuff in the songs thread, and you will get your count up high enough. I think it is 15 posts or something like that. Then once you get enough posts you can post some pictures of your boat as well!

I was going to say I thought Jon has one, but I was not certain. His is a really nice looking boat, so I am sure yours is as well.
 

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I actually tried to message him since I found some pictures of his boat, but my post count isn't high enough for that.
Sorry, I just noticed this thread...

Don't have the time right now, but I'll follow up soon...

In the meantime, congrats - I think you're gonna like the boat...

:)
 

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By the way the boats were made not too far up river from me, but it is now a condo development. Shame too, as they made great boats that they really stood behind. I would love to have a boat manufacturer in the neighborhood. Heck I would apply to sweep there floors part time if they paid me with a boat! It was a sad end to the company.
 

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I'll have to work on getting my post count up and then I'll post some pictures. The rigging is a lot more than I'm use to since it has two halyards for a spinaker (offset to both sides), two for a head sail, and one about two feet down.. or there was one, the internal halyard got pulled through by the previous owner.. Not sure what the lower one would have been used for. possibly a solent stay?
 

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Hey All - Longtime lurker, first time poster. I'm a Chance 30-30 owner as well. Going through a refit now.

Jon - Actually have seen some photos of your boat on the forums as well - looks amazing and like you've done quite a bit of work to her. Question for you: I noticed you have a dodger. Did you raise your boom to get that extra clearance?

Thanks in advance
 

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Jon,
I'd love to see some more pictures of your boat, especially below deck.
Sorry for the delay in following up…

My boat is actually Hull #1… If you've read the Allied history of the boats, she was originally launched as BOOMERANG, and had a very impressive racing record in the early 70's on the LI Sound/Southern New England circuit. Every once in awhile, I run into someone who recalls racing against her. Wish I knew a bit about the original owner, she was apparently very well sailed…

When I found her, she was being sailed out of Peconic Bay on Eastern Long Island. Always had a good feeling about the boat, and somewhat of a kinship with Brit Chance. Like me, he grew up sailing on Barnegat Bay, and I came to know his sister - the very successful racing sailor Jan Chance O'Malley - from racing against her in Lightnings and E-Scows thru high school and college… So, my attachment to the boat has always had somewhat of an emotional/"feel good" component to it, which is a nice thing, and only continues to grow with time…

She remains the first and only keelboat I've ever owned. I had originally assumed she would be more of a 'starter boat' for me, that I'd eventually move up to something bigger. But the more I sailed her, the more I came to appreciate what a sweet boat she is. And, given the amount of good memories and sweat equity I've put into her by now, I'd have a difficult time ever getting rid of her. I've often thought that if I ever did step up to a bigger boat, I'd want to 'keep her in the family', so to speak - probably by trucking her out to San Francisco or Lake Tahoe, where she could be sailed by my brother and my nephews…

By now, my boat bears very little resemblance to the original Chance 30-30. I wound up completely gutting the interior, and building in much more tankage (105 gals of water, 50 of fuel, 18 holding) Sorry, but I've never gotten around to taking many pics of the interior. I've spent the last few weeks unloading her from my cruise this summer, so right now she's back in 'workshop mode', but I'll see what I can come up with once she gets tidied up a bit, again… These are the only ones I have handy at the moment, of the fore cabin, and my stand-up nav station, part of which slides back over the quarter berth when not in use… The third is of my signal flag cabinet, what can I say, I've always had a thing for flags… :)











My major modification was fitting a new keel… All the weight I've added to the boat wound up sinking her enough that I started to have a real problem getting in and out of my lagoon here on Barnegat Bay with her original draft :) I also found I sometimes got some pretty impressive weather helm with the original 'shark fin' keel, which of course could produce a destructive amount of leverage in a hard grounding. The stringers/floors at the aft end of my keel showed some damage from previous groundings, and when I eventually had a serious 'event' of my own, I decided it was time to swap it out for a shoal draft 'Beavertail' that Mars Metals was making for Tartan Yachts… With the superb guidance of our very own Jeff H, I moved the CE of the new keel a bit, and the boat is better balanced as a result…

I also rebuilt the rudder, upgrading the original 1 1/4" bronze rudder stock to one of 1 5/8" Nitronic 50, and rudder bearings from Tides Marine. I also got rid of the skeg, and built the leading edge out about 15%, creating a balanced spade, which has turned out to be a huge improvement…





I wanted to upgrade the rig for sailing offshore, so added an inner forestay and running backs. With inline shrouds and single lowers, that deck-stepped mast is vulnerable to pumping beating into a chop with only the baby stay to prevent it… You might want to check your baby stay chainplate, I found I needed a bit of additional support at the bulkhead. I replaced and upgraded all the chainplates when I re-rigged everything with Dyform and Sta-Loks…

The original Palmer gas engine is long gone, putting in a Perkins M-30 was one of my first projects...

Hey All - Longtime lurker, first time poster. I'm a Chance 30-30 owner as well. Going through a refit now.

Jon - Actually have seen some photos of your boat on the forums as well - looks amazing and like you've done quite a bit of work to her. Question for you: I noticed you have a dodger. Did you raise your boom to get that extra clearance?

Thanks in advance
The placement of mainsheet on the 30-30 is a bit problematic. I hated the original position at the bridge deck/companionway, which of course pretty much eliminates the possibility of fitting a dodger. I originally moved the traveler to mid-cockpit, just forward of the cockpit seat lockers. That's probably the best spot for it, but I felt it cluttered the cockpit too much for my taste, so I eventually took the traveler all the way aft, behind the tiller. I like it, but it takes a bit of getting used to, and you really have to take care when jibing. But for me, it's the best compromise overall, and really makes the boat like sailing a dinghy, the mainsheet always within easy reach…





My windshield/dodger is pretty low-profile, I never had to raise the boom to accommodate it. I did, however, wind up raising the boom a couple of inches when I replaced the original gooseneck fitting, but probably no more than 2-3 inches, no big deal…

That's all for now, but feel free if you guys have any more questions, I'll try to follow up… These are really wonderful boats, in my opinion, seems a pity there aren't more of them out there… Then again, one of the things I've always enjoyed about mine, is that I so often get the question, "what kind of boat is that?"

:))
 

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Wow thank you for all of this JonEisberg. What a great wealth of information. I to have gutted the entire interior, so far just finishing the vberth and laminating the forward bulkheads with formica or FRP, and veneer on the cabin bulkheads. I also removed the head adjacent sink/vanity area and am in the process of turning that into a hanging locker. I'm without an inboard at the moment, so that's something I've been on the lookout for as well.

My standing rigging is in need of a renewal but that will probably wait until the new year. I like the idea of adding a inner forestay and running backs.

This is really helpful regarding the dodger as well. The traveller is indeed problematic!

Again, thank you for all the information and I hope you don't mind me periodically asking you questions!
 

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Jon,
I'd be interested in seeing how you went about the layout of the interior. It looks like you removed the lockers above the port and starboard bunks? Also where did you locate your water and fuel tanks? I am in the process of glassing in a truly structural/water tight bulkhead at the aft end of the v-berth (original panels were lightly tabbed in only a few places). This new bulkhead will serve as the aft end of my new 60 gallon integral water tank. I have the room to go larger, but I am hesitant because of weight. What would your input be? I am also planning another tank in the aft end eventually, which would help balance things out. Thanks in advance!
 

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Jon,
I'd be interested in seeing how you went about the layout of the interior. It looks like you removed the lockers above the port and starboard bunks?
i guess I must have, I'd forgotten there were any there, until you mentioned it... :)

I changed the original vee-berth considerably. It was way too high for me to navigate easily, so I lowered it several inches, filled in the 'vee', and probably moved it aft a bit to compensate for the shortening of the length that resulted from lowering the foot...

The forward portion under the berth is my holding tank, built integral to the hull, but most of the space beneath is simply storage space. It's the only space big enough to accommodate my folding bicycle, for instance...

Also where did you locate your water and fuel tanks? I am in the process of glassing in a truly structural/water tight bulkhead at the aft end of the v-berth (original panels were lightly tabbed in only a few places). This new bulkhead will serve as the aft end of my new 60 gallon integral water tank. I have the room to go larger, but I am hesitant because of weight. What would your input be? I am also planning another tank in the aft end eventually, which would help balance things out. Thanks in advance!
My water tanks are integral to the hull, as well, and occupy most of the space below each settee... I forget exactly how much I modified the original settees, I definitely made them a bit wider, and angled the tops a bit downward towards the hull to make them a bit more comfortable, and give me a bit more headroom/clearance under the side deck when sitting upright (but I'm taller than most) Each tank is about 5' long, and the two combined amount to a total capacity of almost precisely 100 gallons... Wish I could claim I'd planned it that way, but that's just the way it happened to work out :)

If you're building your own tanks, be sure to build in sufficient access/inspection ports for cleaning, etc., you'll definitely thank yourself later. I used the large screw-ins from Beckson, and aside from having to renew the small O-ring gasket in one of them a few years ago, they've worked great...

I built my fuel tank, as well, another lucky guess that turned out to be a 50 gallon capacity. It's a wide, fairly shallow tank that occupies much of the space between the rudder post, and the shaft log, the contour of the bottom matching the shape of the hull... It was built outside of the boat, and to a dimension that could be dropped into place thru the cockpit locker lids, in the event I ever had to remove it for repair... However, it's in there to stay, there's no way it's ever coming out of the boat, now... Well, not in one piece, at any rate :)

It's tough to do on boats of our size, but you really want to try to keep as much weight out of the ends as you can. So, as regards tankage, you're better trying to 'centralize' it as much as possible, particularly on boats with the ends as pinched as ours... However, as I'm sure you're realizing, that's difficult to achieve in reality... But your thinking is sound re that forward tank, and I too would be hesitant to go much larger than that... But a lot of additional gear eventually winds up on the lazarette/cockpit lockers, so there is that likely tendency to balance things out, in the end... but if you can, creating some water tankage under the settees near the center of the boat will probably be the best solution...

Hope this helps... Sorry, I still don't have any 'presentable' photos to share, the interior is a total mess/workshop mode at the moment... Almost looks like a photo in a brokerage ad, come to think of it...

Good luck, keep us posted...
 

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Jon - I liked your picture of your 30-30 in Cruising World this month.
Thanks... but as described, there was a ton of luck involved in that one :)

Photographers are rarely entirely pleased with the ultimate display of their pics, but I think the art director did a very nice job with that layout...

For me, being limited to 300 words in composing the caption/backstory to the pic, however... now, THAT was a challenge...

:))
 
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