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If you'd really prefer a gentleman with boat to have a romantic connection and sail off into the sunset then be BOLD and get your name on every singles sailing site as you can. There's plenty of men who would delight in someone that wants to share their passion.


Mark
Apparently all it takes to find one is to wear a sailboat charm necklace. I wish I'd known that back when I was single.

:wink
 

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... I am not a mechanic and would definitely need a man around for all those things, so it is best I become part of a crew or a captains wife. ...
I'm not mechanically inclined either but one thing sailing did for me was test my self-imposed limits and I discovered that I'm not as dumb as I thought. Learning how to at least change the oil on our diesel engine, how to change the filters, what to look for in the systems BEFORE something breaks, explodes, or otherwise goes to hell, how to do routine maintenance...is empowering to say the least.

Makes me feel that I've earned that sunset and glass of wine at the end of a day's sail.

Don't sell yourself short. Once you learn something and give yourself that first mental fist bump, it gets addictive and you move on to the next learning experience.
 

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Buy your own boat and the dude will come to you. :)
That's exactly how it worked for me. And the boat hadn't even left the driveway before we met.

There were a few women in the Catalina club we used to belong to who started out single handing their C30s in their 60s and THEN they met their current husbands.
 
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Discussion Starter #26
Don't necessarily need to find a husband, that is not what this thread is about. I am very happy being my own person but the companionship would be nice if the situation arose. I am good being a crew member and learning as I go. I can do some things better than others. Cooking is one skill I have. Like Donna said, she learned the skills like changing the oil and filters etc. Those things I can learn given the right teacher. I like the idea of testing my limits. I am not sure I would have the strength to do some things and those would have to be taken care of by others. The goal is to be a useful crew member of a boat at my age and can I do that and it appears that from these answers, I can.
 

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Don't necessarily need to find a husband, that is not what this thread is about. I am very happy being my own person but the companionship would be nice if the situation arose. ...
Understood but, as with most forum discussions, any side road will most likely be followed.

I hope you stick around and keep us updated and keep posting questions. I love hearing about anyone pushing his or her envelop but too often they disappear after the initial flurry. I've met a boatload of people in person who I first talked to via the forum and I must say that my sailing world has opened up beyond my dreams. I had to extend my goals to keep ahead of myself. It's a wonderful sport/lifestyle/hobby in which you can do as much as you mentally and physically feel comfortable.

If you search any of the sailing forums you'll find there are others who had the same questions and concerns. Keep yourself in the boat and keep the water out. The rest will follow.
 
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Mechanical ineptitude is not a gender thing. If you put yourself in a situation where new skills are needed ,wimpering doesn't help much. I've always admired the women I've met over the years who built, owned or equally shared a vessel and life style. Just get out there and make it so. What's the worst that can happen? (getting older, wishing?)
 

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I sailed home from Hawaii to Seattle 7 times with my favorite sailing pal. He was 75 the first time we battled that whale pasture. Ray worked at a local sailing club until his mid eighties. He started sailing in earnest when his wife passed, he was 67 years old, you will do just fine:)
 

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My neighbor single handed his 42' yawl into his early 90's. Attitude is much more of a factor than age. Fate can destroy ones health at any age, but until that happens, go for it. I know people in their 50's who never get out of their chairs. I have friends in their 70's still doing marathons. One of my friends mid 70's just completed her first triathlon. She won her age group because she was the age group. Some of the best sailor's I know are women, including my wife. Sailing is more about good judgement more than physicality, and judgement is a trait that age enhances.

Don't let anyone put you off this dream.
 

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Don't necessarily need to find a husband, that is not what this thread is about. I am very happy being my own person but the companionship would be nice if the situation arose........
I truly hope you find what will make you happy. Get involved and it will increase your odds. I'm not sure I totally understand what that is, if you hope to live aboard.
 
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It's certainly possible to do what you suggest. It sounds like you've embraced the idea of taking a series of sailing lessons, which is great. I may also help you make some connections that help you in your search for your boat.

At least one of your replies has mentioned the other aspect of sailing, which is maintenance. I think of it as boat management. Knowing what things need to be maintained, and when. And if you're at all handy, taking care of a portion of it yourself. And being able to differentiate between what you can do and what you can hire out. Not to mention, being able to handle the bills if you have to hire it out. As has already been said, boat management is the more demanding aspect of sailing.

Hopefully, as part of your learning process with classes, you'll get a sense of how big a boat you'll want. Too big, and it won't leave the boat. There is a sweet spot.

Also, you'll want to think whether you'll be able to single-hand the boat. Go by yourself, and you're single-handing. Take a friend that doesn't know how to sail, and you're single handing. I'm 62. I single-hand most of the time...even with my wife onboard. If I go out by myself, I might go out and noodle around with just the genoa, so there's less for me to do. You'll have to find out if you're able to take the boat out by yourself, unfurl the genoa, and manage the boat on your own. And, when it's time to furl the genoa, do you have the skill and strength to skills to do it on your own? If you have to make arrangements to find crew for each outing, unless you have a large circle of sailing friends, or a friend who is skilled and will accompany you often, you could find yourself stuck at the dock.

What you're wanting to do, is something that a person who plans and puts one foot in front of another, and gets things done will succeed at. It won't happen very well by itself. But, it's a lifestyle that's worth the effort, as the rewards are there.

Too bad you're in Florida, and my wife and I are in Muskegon, MI. Otherwise we'd be able to get you started/hooked up in one of the least expensive sailing areas where there's no salt in the water and everyone speaks English. Half the year on boat, the other half in Florida. Oh, well.

If you're going to do the sailing thing, and this sailor thinks the rewards are there, start now and GO GO GO. Sorry, but no time to waste. You'll need to balance going full steam ahead with not making any rash decisions (buying the wrong boat that doesn't suit your needs). Read, read, read, ask, ask, ask, and you have a shot at this thing.
 

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She doesn't want to buy a boat.

She has said so in 3 posts #1, 19 and 26

Why is everyone telling her to buy a boat or learn mainatance when she has said in almost every post she doesn't want to buy a boat?

Please read Post #1

Post #19

Post #26
 

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She doesn't want to buy a boat.

She has said so in 3 posts #1, 19 and 26

Why is everyone telling her to buy a boat or learn mainatance when she has said in almost every post she doesn't want to buy a boat?

Please read Post #1

Post #19

Post #26
She has mentioned living on one whether or not it's hers. I suppose that has been ratcheted back but it was put out there and unless you're planning on being total Boat Fluff (I have one of those), you have to learn SOMETHING about the boat. Since she posted here I'm guessing she isn't going the total Fluff route.
 

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Don't necessarily need to find a husband, that is not what this thread is about. I am very happy being my own person but the companionship would be nice if the situation arose. I am good being a crew member and learning as I go. I can do some things better than others. Cooking is one skill I have. Like Donna said, she learned the skills like changing the oil and filters etc. Those things I can learn given the right teacher. I like the idea of testing my limits. I am not sure I would have the strength to do some things and those would have to be taken care of by others. The goal is to be a useful crew member of a boat at my age and can I do that and it appears that from these answers, I can.
Yes, you can!!
 

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In post #1, she said she wanted to live aboard and was hoping a boat owner would help her "learn the ropes". Nothing about not wanting her own boat. You were just clairvoyant. :)
 
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The goal is to be a useful crew member of a boat
I am not looking to own my own boat but to be part of a crew on a boat. I am not a mechanic and would definitely need a man around for all those things, so it is best I become part of a crew or a captains wife.


I am sorry Donna and Minne, but I am reading English.
What language are you using??? :)
 

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Apparently, this really matters to you? Fine, you're right.

That second quote was when she clarified in a follow on post. Her first post was oblique.
 
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There are 37-year-olds who are too old to learn sailing and there are 67-years-olds who are not too old. In depends on your genetics, history, luck, physical condition, mental condition, and attitude, not how many summers you have lived through. The only way to find out is to try it for yourself. Sailing clubs, meet-ups, etc. are all good, but in the end, you have to make it happen for yourself.
 
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