SailNet Community banner
21 - 26 of 26 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
65 Posts
I installed a 3/4" stainless steel valve on the hose connected to the seacock for raw water intake. I can now choose to have water go from the seacock to the strainer... or to a 3/4" nylon hose which I insert in to a 1 gal antifreeze bottle.

To winterize:
I open 2 gallon bottles of pink antifreeze.
run the engine at idle
place one bottle in the engine compartment and insert the nylon hose
turn the ss valve to select the antifreeze (nylon hose), close the seacock
engine will pull anti-freeze from the anti-freeze bottle
when bottle of anti-freeze empties, I place the hose in the 2nd bottle.
Then I go above to check the engine exhaust (spitting out of the thru hull)
if exhaust "water" is pink and bubbly I stop the engine
Antifreeze has replaced all sea water in the engine cooling circuit
Unused anti freeze goes into bilge or plumbing fixtures
Something like this?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,320 Posts
Timely discussion. :)
I just got home from winterizing our Betamarine25 (Kubota block, 3 cylinder).
I have the Forespar 3 way valve integrated into their thruhull fitting. As per usual for the last two decades, I attach a short piece of hose to the "hose bib" fitting on the top. Drop the other end of the hose into a one gallon bottle of pink "RV" antifreeze. Then warm up the engine. Finally, with the engine idling away, turn the valve from 'outside' water to the position for the hose connection, and watch the pink liquid start to go down.
Walked back up to the cockpit, and in a few seconds the exhaust burps out some pink water, and I push the stop button. Done, and Done.
Unscrew the hose and put it away. As usual the whole raw water side (strainer, heat exchanger, and water lift muffler) took approx 3 quarts.
Last, put a "winterized" note on the throttle, and turn the valve to the 'off' position for the winter. While hard freezes are kind of rare here, we had a very damaging ice storm last February, so it's better to be prepared.
Link: Engine Flush Out
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
155 Posts
If you have an intake strainer assembly on the boat, get one of these:


It makes winterizing a snap. Take off the top of the strainer. Put the seaflush funnel in it. Turn a couple of gallons of -100 upside down in the funnel while running the engine with thru hull closed. Done. FWIW, I always test the antifreeze concentration that comes out the exhaust when I'm done to make sure what comes out is not diluted.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,233 Posts
Ethylene glycol is toxic. Not appropriate to be run through a raw water circuit. I believe the freeze/burst difference still exists anyway.
All this stuff is (somewhat) toxic. If you can prevent it, don't discharge any of it into the waterways. This is not really practical though when winterizing the boat in the water.

However, for the application we are talking about (winterizing motor cooling systems) there is no difference in toxicity between ethylene glycol and propylene glycol. Ethylene glycol is much more toxic for mammals but this is not the case for other life forms. Assuming you don't have a dolphin sucking on your exhaust :) it will not make a difference. But of course don't use it in your drinking water system, you are a mammal!

One advantage of propylene glycol is that it is better for some system components including impellers, possibly others.

Drew Frye (PDQ) published several papers on this, including here on SN.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,289 Posts
We use the alternate method of more RUM. We will be winterizing starting end of next week We will stock up on extra Rum as it is forecast to dip below 60 degrees next week. well not really 61 almost below 60
 
21 - 26 of 26 Posts
Top