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Im a big fan of my Origo and sad to see that they are no longer available.

I think it's important to make the distinction between the "old fashioned" pressurized alcohol stoves and the Origo, unpressurized alcohol stove. They are two completely different animals. That they use the same fuel is the *only* common between them. Most of us that have used pressurized alcohol stoves have had a bad experience. But that has no bearing on the suitability of the unpressurized stoves.

My Origo is a pleasure to use, very safe, and hot. I use it a lot on it and never a complaint (from either cook or guests)
 

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I think I can speak with at least some authority. On our 26' boat we have an Origo fixed non pressure stove. We also have a 5# propane bottle mounted on the toe rail and secured to a stanchion which powers the small sized Force 10 bbq. And we also have a propane tank feeding the propane stove and bbq in our tent trailer.
I don't think there is any argument that propane is more efficient and overall less money is spent on fuel. However, as was mentioned earlier, going to the effort and expense of installing propane lines in a part time cruiser seems like too much effort. For us, cruising 5 or 6 weeks full time, the ease and safety of the Origo is a good choice.
I definitely think that the Origo products are over priced. Because they are made of stainless steel for the most part they last very well.
But the design and engineering is less than great; I have had to make modifications to my unit to make it more functional.
My suggestion to the OP would be to look for a used unit that is in good condition at a decent price. I have seen them advertised both by individuals and in second hand stores.
If one is living aboard and cooking a lot then I would agree that a properly installed propane system would be a good choice.
 

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Minnesail
The first problem is a bit unique I think. Ours is an alcohol/electric combination; I would not have spent the extra money for the electric but I actually inherited the stove almost free. Anyway, the electric heating elements are flat spirals that are supported by 1 inch square tabs that are spot welded in a vertical format. The coils were very uneven and so a pot would sit very crooked. Also, 2 of the 6 supports broke off. I installed stainless bolts which hold things even and will last forever. The other issue is the springs which hold the fuel cannisters. After a few years they lost their ability to hold the cannisters up against the underside mechanism. This led to some evaporating fuel and also what led to the discovery was that a burner would reignite on it's own because the slide gate had not fully extinguished the flame. It's a bit hard to explain but basically I installed wedges under the supports that hold them up more firmly. I admit that these are not huge issues but they were both easily preventable through a little more attention to detail in the design and manufacture. There was also some issues with the electric controls which I was able to resolve. Nothing too big I suppose but this unit was selling in Canada for about 700 dollars at the time I inherited it...20 years ago.
 

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Just keep x number of 1lb bottles onboard, refilling them from the 20lb at home.
Camp stove
If you mean the standard Coleman (or similar) gas bottles used for camping. be very careful. They are notorious for leaky valves. They are built to be cheap and disposable.

I use them for the grill in the cockpit but would never think about taking them into the cabin.
 

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So, I was planning to install an Origo alcohol stove on my sailboat. However, it seems that Dometic has stopped making them.

I'm considering buying a used one. But I'm also using this as an opportunity to consider other options.

My reasons for choosing the Origo in the first place:
* This boat never had a propane system, so installing a propane stove would be a big job to build the lockers and everything.
* I like the fact that the Origo can run off multiple fuels and doesn't require pressurized fuel.

So, does anyone know of any options similar to the Origo stoves that I should investigate?
I strongly recommend kerosene. We had this discussion before (you can do a search on sailnet) and there are lovers and haters. I am definitely a lover, for the last 18 years (ever since I own my boat). They are also hard to find by now but I feel that kero is the safest high energy fuel you can use on a boat.
 

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The first problem is a bit unique I think. Ours is an alcohol/electric combination;
Oh, wild.

Mine has taken a bit of damage because a few times I left it unsecured on a counter and it flew across the cabin during a tack. A couple welds broke, but I drilled them out and put in a small nut and bolt and now it's good as new. I wouldn't have wanted to be down there and get smacked by the sharp edged thing though...
 

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There are LOTS of non-pressurized alcohol burners sold as camping stoves. Just check Amazon. Using two, it would be easy to convert a pressurized stove.
 

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Alcohol stoves have cosiderably less BTU than propane. ....just a thought.
I read all the concerns of this prior, and while it may be a fact that the max BTU is lower than propane, we have noticed no discernible difference in cooking as compared to our electric stove at home. Fry, boil water, heat sauces, cook pasta, seafood, sear steak, etc.. Works fine.
 

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So, I was planning to install an Origo alcohol stove on my sailboat. However, it seems that Dometic has stopped making them.

I'm considering buying a used one. But I'm also using this as an opportunity to consider other options.

My reasons for choosing the Origo in the first place:
* This boat never had a propane system, so installing a propane stove would be a big job to build the lockers and everything.
* I like the fact that the Origo can run off multiple fuels and doesn't require pressurized fuel.

So, does anyone know of any options similar to the Origo stoves that I should investigate?
Hi,
I have an Origo non-pressurized stove/oven combo and love it. My only unresolved issue is that recently I have stopped using it due to tremendous amount of black spot depositing on burnets, pans and rising from the flame. I have tried every brand of denatured alcohol and always the same problem.

My conclusion is the problem COULD be the age/ condition of the canister rather than the fuel itself. I believe the opening mesh area includes some type of absorbent material that allows the alcohol vapor to ignite, so possibly the canister should be replaced. Any thoughts on solution to the spot problem? I use it every day (or at least I used to before the spot problem,) Any suggestions would be appreciated. Thanks. Jude
 

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Oops, I mean SOOT problem not spot!
We get zero soot on ours. I’d assume either impurities in your fuel, which you said you’ve tried many of, or maybe as you say the canisters need to be replaced. odd that all 3 of your canisters would exhibit the issue? Did you run them out of fuel repeatedly so that they are all chared and black?

FWIW, I usually get the denatured alcohol from lowes in the blue can. It mentions stove fuel in small print as well.
 

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Is it possible that some contaminant got in the canister? Like maybe a pot boiled over and now there's crud on the top of the absorbent pad?
 

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A 'tremendous' amount of soot sounds suspicious. Are you sure that you didn't inadvertently use the wrong fuel, maybe varsol or something? If you haven't done so yet, I think you should burn off all the remaining fuel and start with fresh.
 

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Strange I have experimented with a bunch of different fuels, the only time I have noticed any soot is if a I ran it out of fuel and the wick itself burns.
 

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My reasons for choosing the Origo in the first place:
* This boat never had a propane system, so installing a propane stove would be a big job to build the lockers and everything.
* I like the fact that the Origo can run off multiple fuels and doesn't require pressurized fuel.

I'm glad you posted this because I didn't know Origo had stopped making stoves.

My (new to me) 28"Kells came with a Kenyon pressurized alcohol stove that hadn't been used in decades. Former owner went with a propane camp stove. I've had several of the little camping bottles leak over the years, so that was out. I took the Kenyon home and got it running, (sort of) but it didn't inspire confidence.

I looked for other alternatives to propane, but there really aren't any unless money is no object. I grabbed a nice used one on Ebay for 200 at the door. I did find a Canadian outfit that had a couple new ones left in stock for a bit under 500 US delivered.
 

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I have the single burner Origo. Always reliable and brings 2 quarts of water to boil in about 10 mins.
When traveling (not this year), in the morning I make one quart flask of tea and one wide mouth flask of rice, quinoa or farro and vegetable bullion with boiling water. This with a few granola bars will last until mid afternoon. The best thermos meal I made was with quinoa, fish bullion and a can of tuna.

I try not to use it in the cabin as my sailing is usually only in the summer when any excess heat is unbearable, so mostly used in the cockpit.

I also have a Coleman oven to use on top of the Origo, but have only used it twice in 5 years. It works as advertised but I will only use it in the cockpit in light wind and almost glass still water. The oven sitting on top of the Origo is not stable with even the smallest powerboat wake, and the exterior is to hot to touch.

I use denatured alcohol from Lowes, Home Depot or a paint store. A quart will last about a week once in the morning and once in the evening.

I have never had a soot problem but it just may be that I rarely use the Origo in the cabin to notice it.
 

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Lots of good advice here.

I just build a new fuel tank for my OLD pressure alcohol stove. I like my stove. HOWEVER, I am a 23 year high school science teacher and very comfortable with pressurized alcohol and its behavior. I know that my perspective is unusual. When fully heated and with typical heat settings, you WILL see a pressure alcohol stove flame. To pre-heat, use the least amount of liquid alcohol and be patient--wait until you are certain the alcohol in the burner is vaporized before starting the fuel flow.

But, that's probably not happening here. So, getting back on track:

I've used pressure alcohol, propane (both on boats and camping), as well as a chef's omelette station-style butane canister stove (also boats and camping).

I had a longtime sailing friend that bought a two burner Colman propane camp stove. He put the guts of this stove into his old, gutted pressure alcohol stove and fueled it with canisters.

I guess my point is this: a lot of viable options have been presented in this thread along with their pros and cons. Settle on something and be sure you learn very well the pros and cons of your decision.

Good luck.
 

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I too had good service from my Kenyon pressure stove, it worked really well and I never felt it was unsafe. But it was noisy. On quiet mornings my wife and I enjoy our coffee time, it is immeasurably better with the silence of the Origo.
 
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