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totally ok with it
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Ambitious

Hi-
I am a 40 year old sailer who re-engaged with the activity about 6 years ago. I grew up on lake Okanogan in BC, playing with the odd dingy, but did not sail again until I took up windsurfing in a big way 6 years ago. That led to some racing on a friends CS 36, and taking an ASA course in St. Augustine Florida, where I happened to move. There I sailed J-24s and C-30s on the weekends. Moved back to BC in 06.

Now, I find myself dreaming of buying my first boat. I want to start with a boat I will own for some time, so I have been thinking for about two years on the topic. I intend to buy used and moderately cheap, and grow up with the boat, leading to a fairly extended cruise in 5 or so years time.

I like Jeff H's philosophy (fast and fractional) as expressed in a thread about blue water choices in the 35-38 foot range, but I also like the look of classic lines and rich wood interiors. The Corbin 39 appeals to me, as the pilot house design looks very livable, and the boat is still attractive.

I intend to sail solo on my trip. I am hoping to get some blue water experience this summer if I am lucky enough to find a seat.
I bring extensive practical first aid experience with skiing type injuries to the table, but not a lot of sailing experience.

Can't spell, BTW.

Cheers!
 

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Welcome Shapka! :)

It is nice to see someone else here who has ambitious plans without a lot of experience to back it up (yet). That's the funny thing about experience, you never have it when you need it the most (in the beginning)! :D

Hope to see you "out there" ..
 

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Welcome to SN you Basterd! And don't worry about the spelling. Most of us can't spell iether.
 

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totally ok with it
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
experience

Well, as to the acquisition of experience, I remember a CS prof informing a complaining lab about the difficulty of solving a counting problem of some kind. His point was that one cannot expect to learn hard things without a struggle: words that have comforted me many a time.

There is also a balance with one's personal level of risk aversion.

It seems one has to jump in sometimes, but never without taking a good hard look.

Breaking things into components seems to make sense, but it also has limits, specifically time limits, as life is short, and if you rehearsed every step of every move before synthesizing a skill, you would not get much done.

So I expect that I will still be green as okra when I make my first over the horizon trip, but at least, lightly seasoned.

Smack- I'll see you in FC.
 

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welcome aboard, eh?

Welcome from a fellow Canuck

The West Coast of Canada is one the greatest places to sail. It is also one of the hardest: big tides and currents, lots of rocks, and light winds (especially in the summer). If you can sail there, you can sail anywhere.

Jack
 
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