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1982 Skye 51
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm sure there is a thread out there about this but the Search function never yields me useful results, so...

I found a crack in one of the marine eye swages on my running backs the other day and I will need to repair them or replace them before the cruising season. I was thinking of just buying the Amsteel/dyneema/whatever is the best deal for the safety/price juggling act and doing the splices myself. No problem on the splices but I am wondering the best way to attach them to the tangs on my mast.

This (fuzzy) picture is of new tangs for my lowers but the ones for the runners were done at the same time and are the same style. I am concerned about chafe on the side of the tangs if i just used a thimble and how reduced the breaking strength would be if I went around an oversized shackle for some articulation.



Any suggestions out there? I want to use these tangs, if possible, and not have to modify for T-balls, etc.

Maybe i will just cut the swages off and re-do them as the wire is fine...
 

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If I understand what you want, then the textile solution is to merely splice an eye in each end of your stay, put thimbles in them, and install like the wire was. Difference would be on the bottom, whereat you'll want a terminator with lashings. That's how my trimaran was done, anyway. My rig was done by Erik Précourt who unfortunately is out of biz. You might can find some of his stuff still out there on eBay

--you'll want to use Dynex Dux, not Amsteel
--and be sure to allow for 'constructional stretch' which people who don't know better call creep, but is actually an initial meshing of the braided fibres. It stops. Creep is elastic elongation over time. Creep doesn't stop. Do a Google search, you should be able to find data for whatever diameter line you're using. Also the terminator/lashing rig will be able to adjust for that, one reason to use lashings rather than turnbuckles
 

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I'm sure there is a thread out there about this but the Search function never yields me useful results, so...

I found a crack in one of the marine eye swages on my running backs the other day and I will need to repair them or replace them before the cruising season. I was thinking of just buying the Amsteel/dyneema/whatever is the best deal for the safety/price juggling act and doing the splices myself. No problem on the splices but I am wondering the best way to attach them to the tangs on my mast.

This (fuzzy) picture is of new tangs for my lowers but the ones for the runners were done at the same time and are the same style. I am concerned about chafe on the side of the tangs if i just used a thimble and how reduced the breaking strength would be if I went around an oversized shackle for some articulation.



Any suggestions out there? I want to use these tangs, if possible, and not have to modify for T-balls, etc.

Maybe i will just cut the swages off and re-do them as the wire is fine...
Colligo Marine - Rigging reduced to its elegant essentials. - Colligo Marine - Synthetic Rigging have both Dynex Dux and hardware adapted to Dynex Dux.

If I understand it correctly you will have a pin through the two tangs.
Could you cut a piece of SS pipe to insert between the tangs so you prevent the tangs from compressing on the rope?
If the angle are OK the tangs should not induce much chaff?
 

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1982 Skye 51
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379 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
If I understand what you want, then the textile solution is to merely splice an eye in each end of your stay, put thimbles in them, and install like the wire was. Difference would be on the bottom, whereat you'll want a terminator with lashings. That's how my trimaran was done, anyway. My rig was done by Erik Précourt who unfortunately is out of biz. You might can find some of his stuff still out there on eBay

--you'll want to use Dynex Dux, not Amsteel
--and be sure to allow for 'constructional stretch' which people who don't know better call creep, but is actually an initial meshing of the braided fibres. It stops. Creep is elastic elongation over time. Creep doesn't stop. Do a Google search, you should be able to find data for whatever diameter line you're using. Also the terminator/lashing rig will be able to adjust for that, one reason to use lashings rather than turnbuckles
These are running backstays and adjustable with a 4:1 setup, so I'm not worried about that initial stretch--over 50' that amount will be negligible when I have 8' of adjustment in the 4:1. But why Dynex Dux and not Amsteel. I understand that the useful life of both is 5-8 years. Why would I pay nearly twice as much for the Dynex Dux?

Not worried about the bottom ends, just a thimble will suffice there.

If I understand it correctly you will have a pin through the two tangs.
Could you cut a piece of SS pipe to insert between the tangs so you prevent the tangs from compressing on the rope?
If the angle are OK the tangs should not induce much chaff?
Good idea about the tube for compression purposes, it is a 5/8" pin. Yes, angles are good but i was more worried about when the runners are nor in use and stored at funny angles to the tangs. Guess i could cover the splices there with some cover material.
 

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My rig is Dyneema Dux but the runners are amsteel and lifelines are amsteel.

Coligio will have the terminators you need to attach to the mast. You may need tangs from them as well or something similiar to provide room for the terminators.

Johnson Marine also has fittings designed to work Dyneema but they are primarily for lifelines - I used their hardware for my lifelines not clear what else they have.

Marc
Crazy Fish - Maintaining, Upgrading and Sailing a Crealock 37
 

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What I am seeing on the mega yachts with line rigging instead of wire (and these are HUGE rigs) are fittings specifically designed for this purpose, very much like Norseman cable ends. Wherever spliced, they use solid thimbles wider than the line and every splice is served. The rigging looks very much like the tarred line rigs of yesteryear.
 
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