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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
any ideas? I was thinking it might not work or be dangerous due to wave movement?
also-
Anyone tried using a small pellet stove on a boat?
any advice is greatly appreciated.
chris from Canada
 

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Hi islandskim. I see that the above post is your first so you are new to SailNet. Let me be the first to welcome you and let you know we are not elitists.
I'm not sure why gravity needs to be used to supply propane to the furnace since the propane is under pressure and that will move the gas to the burner.
 

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If it is vented properly, installed properly, and the fuel is available to you, anything goes. I'm also curious how you would "gravity feed" propane, since it flows by pressure, not gravity.
 

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Sundance 23
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I think the pellet stove would be a great idea, for heat anyway. I don't get the gravity fed propane thing. I use a propane swing-type stove in the cabin and have a propane BBQ on the back rail. Both work great, and I get great mileage from my propane.

Welcome to Sailnet.
 

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One of None
Hunter 34
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Gravity air convection. (no fan) like a typical camper has. Should work, but rust out prematurely since it's steel and painted steel. vent pipe would be quite large because it's natural draft.
 

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One of None
Hunter 34
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Thanks Dale! :D
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
thanks for the posts guys. Gravity simply means no fan., Im curious though if the flame would go out while travelling in rough weather. I have found some small pellet stoves online around 3000 new, so don;t think I'll be going down that rout anytime soon. For some reason they don't have those in Canada (Yet). I have seen the "little gnome" pellet stove for example can run on a 12v fan, again not sure if wave action would affect the operation...??? anyone??
 

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The Dickenson Newport is a great little propane fireplace, two sizes (9,000 and 12,000 BTU) we have the smaller on our 34 footer, used the larger on our last boat, a 40 footer. Fully vented, outside air supply, sealed combustion chamber.. really safe and good ambiance due to the glass front and visible flame.

DICKINSON NEWPORT PROPANE HEATER - P9000 Binnacle.com

Under $1K AND it comes with all necessary flue pipe, deck fitting, etc. All you need to add is the fuel line. Only complaint is a rather noisy fan..

 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I think if I was gonna go propane I would use the old furnace I already have. I like the idea of going gas free though, if anyone has first hand experience with either gravity fed furnace or pellet stove on a boat please post, thanks.
 

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I think if I was gonna go propane I would use the old furnace I already have. I like the idea of going gas free though, if anyone has first hand experience with either gravity fed furnace or pellet stove on a boat please post, thanks.
Is it a Force 10 bulkhead heater? There's a HUGE difference between those and the one posted above, esp on the safety front, but also in the effectiveness...
 

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If your boat is insured you should always consider what the ramifications of installing non-marine approved or compliant LPG equipment means. I had to remove an "on-demand" water heater sold and misleadingly marketed as a "marine unit" out last spring. It did not meet any of the applicable marine safety standards even though the owner believed it did due to misleading marketing. It did not pass the insurance survey and the owner had a choice lose insurance or keep the on-demand water heater....

Among other things to be marine compliant the heater needs be vented and also be sealed combustion (not taking combustion air from the cabin). It also can not have a standing pilot light.
 

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I had to remove an "on-demand" water heater sold and misleadingly marketed as a "marine unit" out last spring. It did not meet any of the applicable marine safety standards even though the owner believed it did due to misleading marketing. It did not pass the insurance survey and the owner had a choice lose insurance or keep the on-demand water heater.....
Main Sail, can I ask the brand/model of the water heater you had to remove?
 

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Maine Sail, just noticed your link. Found that site via search this summer and refered to it often getting Stella seaworthy. The photos and step by step were/are very helpful. Thank You THANK YOU
 

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Dirt Free
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any ideas? I was thinking it might not work or be dangerous due to wave movement?
also-
Anyone tried using a small pellet stove on a boat?
any advice is greatly appreciated.
chris from Canada
Propane on a boat is perfectly safe if done properly. If you do not know whats required to accomplish that don't even start.

If you intend to pursue propane send me a pm with an email address and I'll send you the standards or you can take a look at Safe Boat Propane Installations
 

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Sea Sprite 23 #110 (20)
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propane scares me. It is just as bad as gasoline for sitting in the bilges if you get a leak.. and just as likely to blow your boat skyhigh if it ignites.

I like the kerosine and even better, the diesel stoves.. especially if you have a diesel engine already aboard
 

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One of None
Hunter 34
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Guess no one has ever seen a diesel "explosion" It can happen in a heater that's hot. and someone tries to relight while the fuel is still being gasified by the hot burner. More often with diesel they will belch soot, so much that every surface will be coated.

With all the safety devices available and common sense. and a diesel engine boat. someone would almost have to want to blow up their boat!
 
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