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sunfish?junior?
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I was looking at some of the anchor threads call me lazy I want to know why for sure boats anchor from the bow ? I am new enough to ask and just do not like this is the way its has always been.
Safety ? If you have to leave you are facing the wind ? The boat presents a more streamline hull or less wind when it is bow on to the wind ?
Most all sailboats run from storms they go down wind, If left to its own a sailboat will turn and run it finds its own way. Is it trying to do this at anchor ? Could this cause the boat to drag ?
Why do we anchor with the bow to the wind ?
Ok all you old salts laugh at me but just answer in terms that I understand.:eek:
Good day, Lou
 

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One quick answer...let's say there is a chop in the water when you are at anchor...would you rather have those waves crashing into a flat stern or the bow cutting into the waves?
Take my word for it...it is MUCH preferred to have the bow cutting into the waves.

The reason why it has always been done this way...it's because it is the best way, for many reasons.
 

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I agree with chuck53. How fun would it be to be stern anchored and have your boom flopping back and forth catching the wind like a gybe? Many coastal cruising boats have forward opening hatches, one wouldn't get good ventilation in warmer climates. If the wind slowed and the boat wandered around a bit I could easily see the anchor line getting wrapped in the rudder or the prop, perhaps both! To raise the anchor one would have to back into the wind, no fun. Where would you put a windlass? Which stern cleat would you use? The aft of boats are much wider than the bow, picking one cleat would set the boat at an odd angle to the wind. A bridle could fix that but then how would you board from a dinghy? The side does work. What about after a swim? Most boats have the swim ladder in the stern. Stern towards waves of a decent size could make climbing the ladder an adventure... That's all I can think of in a couple of minutes. Not a dumb question. I doubt that a search would've turned up much.
 

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sunfish?junior?
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Discussion Starter · #5 · (Edited)
Thanks to all ! I kind of knew it was a dumb question :( sorry I had to ask it. I was only wondering if boat design had changed from the full to fin keel and the wider beams and such. This form is the place for me to get some dockside advice.
The only camping on the boat I have done has been in very sheltered places no wave action. All a boat might do is drift. No tide to think about. The biggest wave will be the wake of a bass boat. I have been reading about all sorts of stuff but reading is not like living it.
Good day, Lou
 

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Lou, probably many people wondered the same but didn't have the courage to ask. Think of all the lives you may have saved by asking. :)

No dumb questions around here.
 
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I'll add one more reason. Let's say that you are anchored out and an squall rips though with 60-70+ mph winds. It does happen! When you come to the helm and want to stabilize your position after starting the engine, it's best to be facing into the wind. At any crisis situation while dragging anchor in a squall it's best to be motoring into the wind for your recovery.
 

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Thanks, manatee, and...2009!!?? Where the heck has the time gone?????
"Why is the rum gone?"

.....possible causal connection there? :)
 
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I've seen some mulltis anchor by the stern and it's said that boats that tend to surge and sail around a lot on the hook will sit more sedately anchored by the stern.

By and large though, most boats will present less windage from forward, and usually retrieval is more straightforward. The aforementioned 'chuckle' from waves (even ripples) under the counter would be the kicker, esp on boats with long flat overhangs aft.
 
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Not a dumb question at all. Once in the Keys, I got talked into anchoring from the stern because I couldn't think of a reason why not. We found out why not. In any wind driven chop, it is VERY uncomfortable. Waves hit the stern like a big fly swatter making spray go everywhere and the boat pitches and jerks like crazy. The rudder flops back and forth slamming from one side to the other even when you tie the tiller down. We ALL got seasick that night.
 

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Still it's a great idea for a cruiser to have an easy way to deploy an anchor from the stern. Then:
You can prevent swing such as in a tight spot with a tide running or in a tidal river.
Or in tight anchorage.
Kedge off if you run aground.
We carry a Fortress in a bag. Rode is chain then triple twist somewhat stretchy line. Use the primary until we get to chain. Then will use the outboard engine lift if can't break free by hand or backing down.
Look around as other cruisers have figured some very clever ways to do this. See boats carry big spools of webbing on their sterns. Use that to tie to object on shore. "Anchoring" stern to land using bow anchor to keep them in deep water.
Also down Maine have briefly anchored stern to on a lunch hook to blow the flies out of the boat when we forgot to put the screens in. Boy those flies can bite!!!
 

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Outbound - it is something completely different to stabilize the stern in an anchorage using an additional anchor or webbing than lying on a single anchor from the stern...
Two different type of shoes and while your proposal is practiced, no skipper with some knowledge is going to deploy his single anchor from the stern.
 

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Supposedly, one of the contributing factors to this tragedy was anchoring from the stern.

Survivor Nick Schuyler Speaks About Missing NFL Players, Says They Removed Life Vests

I am sure that it was discussed in the forum but I can't find the thread.
I remember when this happened. Anchoring from the bow would have probably just made this a good story for them to tell when they got in.

But, I keep a Danforth in one of rear cockpit lockers with a 12 foot chain, and line rode, just for when a stern anchor is needed (but in addition to a bow anchor, not as my main anchor).
 

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Totally agree CV. Would never anchor by the stern and my post doesn't suggest that. Just wanted to point out there are multiple reasons it's good to have the ability to deploy an anchor from the stern. If you please re read my above post other than when briefly wanting to have wind through the companionway to flush out flies all the other scenarios made what I thought was the obvious assumption a bow anchor had been set first or the vessel had run aground. Even the o.p. understands a single stern anchor is poor seamanship . He was asking why which was answered. I was trying to expand the conversation and explain why it's good seamanship to be able to have the ability to deploy a stern anchor when need arises.
Perhaps I should always set a stern( and bow) anchor like the old 1st rates. Then I won't get stern raked and can always deliver a broadside.(grin).
 

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Another reason it's potentially dangerous to anchor stern first is debris will hit your rudder or running gear first. Even lines or netting can foul your prop without you knowing it until you wake up put the engine in gear and try to get underway.
CV - May want to look at Bobs "sliver" pictures posted on the steel boat thread. Think that boat would ride nice stern to but rudder would still be exposed.
 

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I have anchored by the stern when there was light wind and no current. There are two reasons to do it; the boat won't sail around the anchor and the companionway acts like a wind scoop, airing out the cabin. Any current is tough on the rudder and a blow will get you very wet. I never did it overnight and I no longer do it at all since I now own a boat with a skeg hung rudder.
 

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sunfish?junior?
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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Ok thanks everyone.:) I felt like I could come up with reasons. With out hearing from a crowd I am alone to wonder if I need to second guess my thoughts. Now I have a for sure reasons why to anchor from the bow.
This post just to keep on subject is one anchor only no bridles, kellets or other systems no advanced techniques.
We may have enough already ?

1. safety... better to face the wind you are ready to go the way you need in an emergency.
2 Comfort... noise spray. boat stability,
3 Easy on the boat... Rudder not slamming less chance of the rode getting fouled in the rudder prop
Thanks so much !
Lou
 
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