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Old soul
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Never heard of this anchor … or do you mean an anchor lift?

#88 is a big anchor. Can you boat and crew manage this size without resorting to heroic effort? If so, it’s probably a good size, but show us which anchor you’re talking about. I suspect it’s cheap because it’s cheap.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks for all the replies. It's really a fairly simple question, "I found a good price on an AnchorLift Pro Anchor 88lb in 316L stainless steel. I can't find any information or reviews online. Does anyone here know anything about these anchors?"
 

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One thing I do know about SS anchors. They get stolen much more frequently than galvanized ones. Why would you want a SS anchor? Do you plan to use it or will it just be an ornament on the bow? I have an 88# Rocna on our 53' sailboat and it required 1/2" chain. There is no plus to a heavy anchor and light chain. The anchor and rode, be it line, chain or a combination, are a complete system, not a bunch of unrelated parts.
You haven't mentioned the size of your boat, rode or windlass, but an 88# anchor will require a much more powerful windlass than something half that weight. What size anchor is suggested for your boat?
 

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Farr 11.6 (Farr 38)
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I was able to find that Anchor Lift makes a range of different style anchors https://www.anchorliftdirect.com/product-category/anchors/ . They appear to be loose interpretations of a variety of well known anchor types namely the plow, delta, Bruce, and next-gens like the Manta and Rocna. It is not clear which of these three types you are considering.

Each of these anchor types have advantages and disadvantages. Of the three types, the TPX, which appears to closely resemble the current crop of next-gen anchors, would probably have the highest reliability, reset likelihood and holding power. While there are folks who swear by Plows, Bruce, and Deltas, I have not had great results with them on the Chesapeake, The part that is harder to unpack, and which I cannot help you with is the relative strength, weld quality, and grip.

The company appears to be located in Ft. Lauderdale and they appear to have produced these anchors for several years. You might call them and see whether they can give you the name of stores who have purchased their anchors and then call a few of those stores to see what they have to say and whether they can refer you to a customer who has used one.

Personally, I like stainless steel in the soft gooey mud of the Chesapeake since they clean off much more easily than my galvanized anchor. I have a SS Lewmar that is my lunch hook and it sure is easier to clean off. That said, stainless steel does not do well in conditions where it will be submerged for long periods of time.

Jeff
 

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Dirt Free
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I was able to find that Anchor Lift makes a range of different style anchors https://www.anchorliftdirect.com/product-category/anchors/ . They appear to be loose interpretations of a variety of well known anchor types namely the plow, delta, Bruce, and next-gens like the Manta and Rocna. It is not clear which of these three types you are considering.

Each of these anchor types have advantages and disadvantages. Of the three types, the TPX, which appears to closely resemble the current crop of next-gen anchors, would probably have the highest reliability, reset likelihood and holding power. While there are folks who swear by Plows, Bruce, and Deltas, I have not had great results with them on the Chesapeake, The part that is harder to unpack, and which I cannot help you with is the relative strength, weld quality, and grip.

The company appears to be located in Ft. Lauderdale and they appear to have produced these anchors for several years. You might call them and see whether they can give you the name of stores who have purchased their anchors and then call a few of those stores to see what they have to say and whether they can refer you to a customer who has used on.

Personally, I like stainless steel in the soft gooey mud of the Chesapeake since they clean off much more easily than my galvanized anchor. I have a SS Lewmar that is my lunch hook and it sure is easier to clean off. That said, stainless steel does not do well in conditions where it will be submerged for long periods of time.

Jeff

DRIFT ALERT !!!!
Hey Jeff, currently at acnhor in Deltaville with our 55lb. Rocna :)
Waiting to see if tomorrows promised gusts of 30 knots appear. We don't go out in that stuff anymore,
especially as it's against the tide :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I was able to find that Anchor Lift makes a range of different style anchors https://www.anchorliftdirect.com/product-category/anchors/ . They appear to be loose interpretations of a variety of well known anchor types namely the plow, delta, Bruce, and next-gens like the Manta and Rocna. It is not clear which of these three types you are considering.

Each of these anchor types have advantages and disadvantages. Of the three types, the TPX, which appears to closely resemble the current crop of next-gen anchors, would probably have the highest reliability, reset likelihood and holding power. While there are folks who swear by Plows, Bruce, and Deltas, I have not had great results with them on the Chesapeake, The part that is harder to unpack, and which I cannot help you with is the relative strength, weld quality, and grip.

The company appears to be located in Ft. Lauderdale and they appear to have produced these anchors for several years. You might call them and see whether they can give you the name of stores who have purchased their anchors and then call a few of those stores to see what they have to say and whether they can refer you to a customer who has used on.

Personally, I like stainless steel in the soft gooey mud of the Chesapeake since they clean off much more easily than my galvanized anchor. I have a SS Lewmar that is my lunch hook and it sure is easier to clean off. That said, stainless steel does not do well in conditions where it will be submerged for long periods of time.

Jeff
Thank you, Jeff, for your reply.

I am in the market for an 80ish pound anchor to put at the end of the existing 300' of 3/8" chain rode for my 54' boat which has a suitable windlass. I have not been considering SS because of the cost and other factors. I would never spend that kind of money knowing that the first time I used it the expensive finish would be ruined. But then I found this brand new, still in the wrapper, AnchorLift Pro plow style 316L stainless steel anchor for slightly less than the cost of a new known brand galvanized anchor. The salvage yard where I found this anchor still has quite a few of the same anchor in various sizes after having sold quite a few. I understand the implications...

AnchorLift's website does show this anchor is still available but only in a 33lb size. (AnchorLift Pro Plow Anchor) I did call them to get more information but the person who answered is new to the company and did not know anything. The one who knows was on vacation. I know it is a knock-off but it seems to be well built.

I have been researching anchors for 6 months or more as I need to replace my existing galvanized CQR. I know the differences between SS and galvanized, preferring galvanized, but I thought the price of this one could change my mind if the anchor was otherwise well built and reliable. Hence my question.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
One thing I do know about SS anchors. They get stolen much more frequently than galvanized ones. Why would you want a SS anchor? Do you plan to use it or will it just be an ornament on the bow? I have an 88# Rocna on our 53' sailboat and it required 1/2" chain. There is no plus to a heavy anchor and light chain. The anchor and rode, be it line, chain or a combination, are a complete system, not a bunch of unrelated parts.
You haven't mentioned the size of your boat, rode or windlass, but an 88# anchor will require a much more powerful windlass than something half that weight. What size anchor is suggested for your boat?
I sincerely thank you for your reply. I know I didn't provide a lot of information that some apparently crave. Please see my reply to Jeff for more information...
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
OK, if these are the ones, then they look like knock-offs, and most likely junk. Is that clear enough?
Thank you Mike. I know they are knock-offs. That alone does not make them "most likely junk." I have seen the anchor first-hand and it looks well made. That and the price makes it worth a closer look. I was hoping to find one or two on this forum with first or second hand knowledge about them.

By the way, the company is "AnchorLift". They carry a few ground tackle related products including an anchor lift which, I suppose, is where the name comes from.
 

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Old soul
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Thank you Mike. I know they are knock-offs. That alone does not make them "most likely junk." I have seen the anchor first-hand and it looks well made. That and the price makes it worth a closer look. I was hoping to find one or two on this forum with first or second hand knowledge about them.

By the way, the company is "AnchorLift". They carry a few ground tackle related products including an anchor lift which, I suppose, is where the name comes from.
No first hand experience with these knock-offs, but have had others. If you do some research, you'll find plenty of data about other knock-offs made by other companies over the years. Invariably, they perform worse than the anchors they purport to be like.

Maybe these are different... but I doubt it.
 

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Don't know why you think a stainless anchor's finish will be ruined by anchoring. We used to have a stainless Delta (true Simpson Lawrence Delta model) with stainless chain. There was never any issue with the finish from anchoring. Maybe some minor scratches and scuffs, but undetectable from 5' away. Mud just slides off stainless - its great for that. I also would not be worried about the welds or corrosion in general. One thing to consider is that 316L stainless is not very strong for an anchor material. No problem with the flukes and body of the anchor, but the 70ksi shank will yield way before the 116ksi steel used in most galvanized anchors.

Besides the above considerations, we found the Delta performance to be unsatisfactory. It is doubtful a copy of a Delta has improved its performance.

Mark
 

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Don't know why you think a stainless anchor's finish will be ruined by anchoring. We used to have a stainless Delta (true Simpson Lawrence Delta model) with stainless chain. There was never any issue with the finish from anchoring. Maybe some minor scratches and scuffs, but undetectable from 5' away. Mud just slides off stainless - its great for that. I also would not be worried about the welds or corrosion in general. One thing to consider is that 316L stainless is not very strong for an anchor material. No problem with the flukes and body of the anchor, but the 70ksi shank will yield way before the 116ksi steel used in most galvanized anchors.

Besides the above considerations, we found the Delta performance to be unsatisfactory. It is doubtful a copy of a Delta has improved its performance.

Mark
I did a lot of research on chain, including SS chain when I needed to buy new chain last. I checked out the Canadian, US, UK and even some German SS chain ($40.00 a foot!!!). Most was Chinese, but that didn't turn me off near as much as finding out that most SS chain failures were at the welds. Apparently, there is no practical way to test the weld, so any SS chain can fail.
Friends in Bequia, on a 50' boat had exactly that happen. I ended up going with the 1/2" BBB anchor chain.
 
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