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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I was reading an article in Caribbean Compass about pet peeves of cruisers and one of the issues was anchoring/leaving under sail. More so in crowded anchorages. I was wondering what the opinions of the people here. Cheers
 

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cruising all I can
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If it's a sailboat, I would think it completely appropriate.
I sail mine at every opportunity, off and on anchorage, in and out of inlets, to and from the dock/slip.
I figure it's nothing new,as sailors, by nature of being aboard sailboats have been doing so long before the engine.
The only reason to fire the diesel is,no wind or I'm in a hurry! and if you're in a hurry aboard a sailboat you may have to rethink your choices.
I'm a sailor aboard a sailboat, therefore I sail.
 

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cruising all I can
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from my observations, people are in a hurry, and under a time constraints alot of the time when they go sailing.
I've tried to not do that. when I step aboard I do it without the time. limit and wait on conditions.
I learned this by not doing it a few times cuz I was struck with gotta-go-itis, I found that can get uncomfortable, guess I'm a fare weather sailor.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
If it's a sailboat, I would think it completely appropriate.
I sail mine at every opportunity, off and on anchorage, in and out of inlets, to and from the dock/slip.
I figure it's nothing new,as sailors, by nature of being aboard sailboats have been doing so long before the engine.
The only reason to fire the diesel is,no wind or I'm in a hurry! and if you're in a hurry aboard a sailboat you may have to rethink your choices.
I'm a sailor aboard a sailboat, therefore I sail.
I'm with you on that Joe.
 

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snake charmer, cat herder
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lol i SAILED into the work dock in shelter island boatyard once..lol my engine had issues and i was taking SAILboat to the yard for yanmar work. as we sailed into dock, folks looked panicked and concerned.....we did perfect.....showed em how to do this..was fun. i was later advised tha t we do NOT allow folks to SAIl into docks in san diego..mebbe it is because one notoriously abusive sailor did once and hit a few boats.....hhmmmmmm
sailing into an anchorage will cause similar concern, as folks do not understand that SAILboats do just that...SAIL

leaving a mooring or anchor....raise jib first , sail off, when into more open water, then raise main. happy sailing.

this was our first lesson (i was 7 yrs old) when learning how to sail, as uncle kept his classic engineless sloop on a mooring. very good progression of teaching. i was most fortunate to have had an old salt as a maestro for sailing.
 

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Old soul
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I was reading an article in Caribbean Compass about pet peeves of cruisers and one of the issues was anchoring/leaving under sail. More so in crowded anchorages. I was wondering what the opinions of the people here. Cheers
I see nothing wrong with a sailboat doing this, as long as the crew are competent and skilled enough to make the proper choices. Not all sailors are good sailors.

I sail off the anchor perhaps 1/2 the time, and anchor that way probably about 5 to 10 percent. I only do this when I'm comfortable with the situation. In a crowded anchorage I very likely would motor, but that's b/c I have a good appreciation for my skill level (or lack of skills).
 

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I was reading an article in Caribbean Compass about pet peeves of cruisers and one of the issues was anchoring/leaving under sail. More so in crowded anchorages. I was wondering what the opinions of the people here. Cheers
I think it depends on a detail. My feeling is that it's irresponsible to do so strictly under sail since something can go wrong, BUT, there's nothing wrong with entering or leaving under sail with the engine at idle. That allows immediate recovery for wind shifts or other unexpected events. The engine would be needed for backing down after the anchor is down, and the engine should be on to help with windlass load.

GTJ
 

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We sail on and off the anchor if the wind is blowing enough to move the boat, at all. Nobody has ever given us any grief about it and I couldn't imagine why they would.
We often have the engine running, though not in gear obviously, as a precaution. We also do not sail through the crowd (what would be the point?), anchoring outside the pack, making it easier to sail off the anchor.
However, I consider it totally imprudent to sail in or out of a marina, or anywhere where we might inconvenience ANY other vessel, or where there is the remotest possibility that my mistake could cause damage to another person's boat.
I couldn't imagine why anyone would care (can you be more specific about which CC you found this in), whether I power or sail on and off my anchor. Most boaters seem to fear even sailing into huge bays such as Rodney, Admiralty, Portsmouth Bays, or even FdF, preferring to power in from the farthest point of land on either the north or south end of the bay, even if it's miles and miles of powering. Go figure. I can honestly foresee the day when fuel efficiency makes most of those sailing today, the power boaters of tomorrow.
 
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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I don't see why more people don't sail on/off anchor especially off their anchor since if the plan is to sail you already will have your main raised.
 

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Broad Reachin'
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To me it's simply a question of competence and conditions. If the conditions allow (i.e., there's actually wind available to sail) and the captain/crew know how to sail off of an anchorage safely, I don't see any issues.

However, a crowded anchorage and/or poor weather conditions (not enough wind, too much wind, wrong wind direction, etc.) don't mix well with a crew not familiar with the procedure for weighing anchor under sail.
 

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cruising all I can
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sailed into Annapolis one holiday weekend (poor planning, will avoid in the future)
right behind one of the much larger charter sailing schooners that had a deckload of passengers.
I remember thinking, "that skipper is good" the moorings were packed and there were boats and skiffs and paddle boards all over. the big schooner sailed right up to the warf!
now that's a sailor.
 

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snake charmer, cat herder
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i only raise main when out in open water, use jib for steering..lol


"Re: Anchoring/leaving under sail
sailed into Annapolis one holiday weekend (poor planning, will avoid in the future)
right behind one of the much larger charter sailing schooners that had a deckload of passengers.
I remember thinking, "that skipper is good" the moorings were packed and there were boats and skiffs and paddle boards all over. the big schooner sailed right up to the warf!
now that's a sailor."

as it should be. everyone should know how to master a sailboat if they have one.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
can you be more specific about which CC you found this in
I believe it is in the March issue.

I'm not to bothered with having the engine on, if I have wind in my sails I have steerage so can avoid other boats.
 

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I routinely sail on and off my mooring, BUT the engine is always running. Mooring field is tight and it's too easy for something unexpected to happen. My previous boat was hit on its mooring by a fellow club member who was sailing to his mooring and there was a sudden wind shift. Good friend was hit last season in a similar manner. Each accident result in over a thousand dollars damage. Just good seamanship to have the engine running and ready.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
there was a sudden wind shift
A wind shift does not turn a boat. It is the person at the helm. As for the argument on seamanship, one could and should say the sails should be made ready in case the engine quits. I see a lot of boats with their mainsail cover on when motoring into an anchorage.
 

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In Northport for example there are 800 something boats on Moorings with perhaps more than 1/2 Sailboats

The boats are all very tight and the fairway is very narrow SO depending on wind direction you can do it without being that "person" and there are many days were you would be quite obnoxious IMHP to make that many people dodge you in a narrow place :)
 

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How could anyone complain about a sailboat, sailing?
Thats just rediculous.
If you see someone on the road weaving through traffic, nearly hitting other other cars and running people down, you get to complain. (Yes, about a car driving!) Similarly, if you see someone sailing badly through a crowded anchorage, you get to complain. (Yes, about a sailboat sailing!) On my last charter I saw a bunch of near misses with boats sailed (badly) in mooring fields on a crater recently.
 

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Mermaid Hunter
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In enjoy sailing on and off moorings and anchor. It keeps me sharper, is good practice, and frankly I like the looks from other boats in the anchorage.

sailed into Annapolis one holiday weekend (poor planning, will avoid in the future) right behind one of the much larger charter sailing schooners that had a deckload of passengers.
I remember thinking, "that skipper is good" the moorings were packed and there were boats and skiffs and paddle boards all over. the big schooner sailed right up to the warf! now that's a sailor.
The Woodwind boats keep their engines running all the time and often are motorsailing to give the customers a better experience.

I've raced one of them from R2 to AH1 a couple of times when the wind was good enough for them to sail only. They still kick my butt - the skippers and crew are pretty good. The boats are also very light for their size.
 
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