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Chuck,

I would agree that MOST of us will use some amount of chain on the anchor. How much, size, that certainly is debatable, has been, will be etc from now until eternity.

Depending upon boat size, I can see a smaller anchor that can be thrown for such a propose too, a large amount of chain may not be what one wants on the end. Or for racers, you want to hold yourself while the tide pushing you the wrong way, with a short wind die. a full overnight anchor setup is not needed. here no chain to a small amount of chain will work fine.

marty
 

· snake charmer, cat herder
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friend of mine with a 50 pound danforth and a 26 ft columbia anchored without chain and i was always saving his boat from impound as he dragged all over san diego bay.
never failed to fail.....

however, for short term and for kedging off a shoal, yes, rope. chain will be a lot to lift, and you are only using that tackle for short time.
 

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Where will you find a 200 pound Danforth and why? According to Danforth, the 25 pound anchor has 1600 pounds of pullout. Their largest "standard" is 100 pounds with 3500 pounds pullout. Can't imagine needing more than that. I wouldn't omit the chain though. It's a vital component to the anchoring system.
Actually here in Seattle there are a couple marine suppliers that carry up to a 1200 Danforth or fortress in stock personally I would use a short length of chain on a kedge anchor to protect the code from the oh crap factor I've found some weird crap on the bottom
 

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Ive seen many a boat, with around 5 feet and hose over the chain for a perfect kedge anchor setup

that 5 feet or so os enough to steady the anchor and make it easier to set and its not enough to make it hard to manhandle

and although I know this isnt common to me a kedge anchor should be able to be THROWABLE

down here panga fisherman do this this way as its the wonly way they can keep the boat off the surf and last through the hightide without going aground

its must be throwable so that means all rode, a little chain and some awesome biceps

the other reason for it being throwable is in the sense that if you run aground ever so lightly and have a visual on a sandbar or shallow area you can throw the acnhor towards it hope it catches and use that along with engine power and winches carefully to take you off...

this is of course before having to deploy dinghies or lean masts over etc...or wait for the tides

peace
 

· snake charmer, cat herder
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the perfect kedging off reef or shoal anchor is a grapple such as are made and used by the pangeros here out of rebar. throwable and easily stuck in bottom for pulling hauling and short term anchoring. doesnt need weight, just needs throwability and stick into bottomness....dont have to throw the kedge..is also accepted to row it out to deeper water, then reboard boat and haul. in weather it is a good idea to be ABLE to throw.. but you cannot guarantee a good toss nor a decent retrieval, as you want that kedging anchor out as far as possible for maximum effect.
besides, THROWING an anchor WILL only screw up your shoulders, back, elbows and hips. try it. just to do something some day...just stand there throwing anchors. see how far ye get before you figure out how to really do it.
 

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thats what I was saying...they make the anchors down here same way...they are common all over the pacific

Ive thrown plenty of similar size small anchors...its the same basically

in this case its the weight that can do harm

a small kedge anchor for me has always been small enough to throw
 
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My favorite kedge anchor is the Fortress. It does not need chain to be a good kedge. Light weight, run it out in the dinghy, drop it winch in the rode..... I helped pull a 40' trawler off the rocks/mud with our Fortress FX-16. He broke his windlass doing so, but it was still better & probably cheaper than the alternative.....
 

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In over 40 years of BC cruising I have found no need for more than 15 feet of chain in these coral free waters . There is not much to chafe or cut rope this far north. In the tropics I use wire rope.
 

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Why not have some chain ? I don't see the problem. I even have 10' of 1/4" chain on my dinghy anchor rhode. The weight per foot of (as an example) 5/16" G4 chain is about 1.1lbs / foot. I believe the standard (official or unofficial) is for a rope rhode to have at least one boat length of chain at the anchor.

If I were handling a damage claim on a vessel which suffered damage due
to anchor dragging and the rode did not include any chain at all then I would report to the underwriter that the owner used anchoring gear unsuitable to the conditions. Chain prevents chafe to the rode and it's weight helps keep the direction of pull parallel to the bottom. Having the direction of pull parallel to the bottom is the essential key element to any anchor holding.
Mitch Witt
SAMS AMS
 

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Discussion Starter · #30 ·
I agree, and I'm guessing that is what the OP is really asking about here... A hook that can be taken out in a tender, for instance, without having to drag along a lot of chain, and used only for a straight line pull, and not for extended anchoring thru wind shifts or changes in tidal streams, etc...

{snipped lots of interesting info}

But, when all is said and done, one of the new gen Spade/Rocna/Manson/Mantus would all serve as a pretty good kedge anchor, as well...
My favorite kedge anchor is the Fortress. It does not need chain to be a good kedge. Light weight, run it out in the dinghy, drop it winch in the rode.....
Thank you Jon and MS. Confirms what I thought before forking out $$$.

Very helpful indeed! :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #31 ·
Ive seen many a boat, with around 5 feet and hose over the chain for a perfect kedge anchor setup

that 5 feet or so os enough to steady the anchor and make it easier to set and its not enough to make it hard to manhandle
An interesting idea.. and not one I've come across before.

I might see if I can rig something like that on the Danforth I have, whilst waiting for the funds to upgrade it to a Fortress..

and although I know this isnt common to me a kedge anchor should be able to be THROWABLE

down here panga fisherman do this this way as its the wonly way they can keep the boat off the surf and last through the hightide without going aground

its must be throwable so that means all rode, a little chain and some awesome biceps

the other reason for it being throwable is in the sense that if you run aground ever so lightly and have a visual on a sandbar or shallow area you can throw the acnhor towards it hope it catches and use that along with engine power and winches carefully to take you off...

this is of course before having to deploy dinghies or lean masts over etc...or wait for the tides

peace
Good point, Christian! Never thought about that.
 
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