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Discussion Starter #1
Hey all

Is there any negatives that I am not thinking of if I rack/angle my windlass to match the chain angle?

I was thinking that maybe the dropping of the anchor may be effected?
 

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I suggest you go to your windlass manufacturer's web site and read the installation instructions. I have no idea what you mean by rack/angle, so I can't advise, but each windlass comes with detailed installation instructions for a reason.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I'll reach out to the manufacturer.

What I mean by racking/angling the windlass is to basically plane down the back section of the spacer that it will sit on to allow the chain to enter the gypsy parallel. If I were to install the windlass flat, the anchor chain would be coming into the gypsy at an angle and as such be prone to jumping.

I know if I were to angle the windlass to match the anchor chain angle, I would solve the chain jumping problem on retrieval, however, I wonder if I am creating a problem where deploying the anchor I could see the chain jump or possibly get stuck?
 

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Before you mess about with the windlass, check that you have the correct gypsy for the chain you are using and that the links have not degraded (rusted) to the point they no longer fit the gypsy.
If the windlass has been working fine until recently, it is probably the chain, not the gypsy.
 

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Is it a horizontal or vertical windlass? If vertical, then the gypsy needs to be in the plane of the chain. If horizontal, then having the gypsy higher than the plane of the chain improves its performance because it allows more links in the gypsy.

If the chain is jumping, it is often a chain/gypsy mismatch - particularly on horizontal windlasses.

Mark
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks yall. Windlass is a vertical VW 10-10 by Maxwell. This is a brand new install as the previous owner decided to ditch the custom 90v DC motor that was driven via the inverter(110v to bow, stepped down to 90v DC) when bought the boat. The windlass was mounted to the deck lid(which flexes when I even stand on it @ 140lbs....scary to think about) and was driven by a pulley & belt.

I am installing the new windlass and just put brand new chain on so I know that everything matches correctly. I am just trying to make sure that I get everything right.
@colemj - since your stating that the vertical gypsy needs to be in plane with the chain - this is what I am trying to confirm, however, is there a concern about the windlass being sloped during deploying of the chain? Obviously the side where the chain leads to the bow isn't a problem, but is there a problem with the side coming through the hawse pipe?

I've seen a few boats solve the problem by adding a roller in front of their windlass to draw the chain down and parallel to gypsy, however, I am not a fan of that design as it mean there will be additional effort on the windlass to retrieve. Since this is a new install I can get around this by angling the windlass to match the chains angle.
 

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@colemj - since your stating that the vertical gypsy needs to be in plane with the chain - this is what I am trying to confirm, however, is there a concern about the windlass being sloped during deploying of the chain? Obviously the side where the chain leads to the bow isn't a problem, but is there a problem with the side coming through the hawse pipe?

I've seen a few boats solve the problem by adding a roller in front of their windlass to draw the chain down and parallel to gypsy, however, I am not a fan of that design as it mean there will be additional effort on the windlass to retrieve. Since this is a new install I can get around this by angling the windlass to match the chains angle.
I don't think I understand what you are asking. The entire windlass will mount in what ever plane it is installed in. If it is parallel pulling up the chain, it will be parallel deploying the chain. I don't understand how it would change orientations, or how one side of the gypsy could be on a different plane than the opposite side?

Of course, the chain must fall off plane into the locker after the hawsepipe, but this is normal, and the hawsepipe is a lead for the chain coming up off plane. Is this what you are asking?

I don't know your particular windlass, but the installation manuals for every one I've installed had explicit instructions, templates, and schematics for aligning and installing properly.

Mark
 

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For a vertical windlass, ideal would be parallel for chain. Will work with a small angle up or down but the two I've installed used pads/blocks so the chain feed was nearly parallel to the end of the roller. If you have a rope gypsy on top of the chain gypsy, which I highly reccomend, line feed needs to be parallel or slightly down or you could get an override or the line coil off the top of the capstan. If the chain gypsy is properly oriented to the anchor roller the rope gypsy should be fine.
 

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Angle itself is immaterial. What you want is for the LEAD of the chain to the windlass gypsy to be "fair"...ie in the place of the gypsy. This is achieved with blocks under the windlass.
 

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I just looked online at a Lofrans vertical windlass installation manual, which advised no more than 5 degree "inclination".

I think that is what you are talking about. Level would be best, but if your gypsey is much higher than the roller, I think it would be helpful to angle the base to meet the 5 degree advice. Within reason, this shouldn't impact the chain tail/fall.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Well I built a solid laminate platform to keep the chain straight. Still have a little bit of work to do but just about done!

14 layers of 1708 makes it half inch thick!

136076
136077
 
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