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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Canadian/BC (Saltspring Island based) solo sailor on the last legs of a Pacific circumnav was successfully rescued by a large car carrier between NZ and Hawaii.

The boat was apparently an 11 meter Bene, some news stories told of a knockdown and an opening of the hull/deck joint. He struggled for 5 days to keep her afloat apparently.

http://www.3news.co.nz/Canadian-sai...Force/tabid/417/articleID/339750/Default.aspx
 

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Just to clarify, Art Munneke had sailed from the west coast of the Americas through the South Pacific to NZ and had just started the trip to bring his boat back to BC. Not a circumnavigation of the world but the South Pacific.
I am sure that was a very scary five days!
 

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Good outcome! Rescued, that is.

Don't know if I've ever seen it mentioned here before, but I do not like/want glass on the boat when at sea. Anyone else have that phobia?
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks for the correction, tjv..

On the face of it a high sided car carrier seems an unlikely rescue craft, but from what little information is available at this point it went off without a hitch, at least from Art's perspective. Must have made a great wind break, though!!
 
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Sounds like he worked hard for 5 days keeping it afloat.
I wonder what sort of Bene?

That northbound NZ passage is damn sticky at times, half a dozen boats lost on it one year about a decade ago.

I agree to remove and box all glass on a passage. Though I forgot last year and did 14 days upwind and didnt break a thing lololol

The boat must be secured for sea, but still in any knockdown the place will be a mess. But with broken glass just horrible!

He has done very well, and the boat has served him well, together, to keep afloat for five days before deciding to hit the Red Button.

AMVER is great! Unsung heroes in many, many rescues.
:D:D

Not drawing a comparison, directly, with Reble Heart, by cargo ships are not trained rescue experts like those navy dudes. Full credit to the ship and crew for doing something outside their expertise! Car carrier would have made a nice wind shaddow!!!
 
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Beneteau uses and inward facing flange and Plexor to glue the hull and deck together, they also have mechanical fasteners but I do not know the spacing.

Hunter uses an outward turned flange. They do this because they can get more parts from a mold more quickly. They readily admit it is not as strong as an inward turned flange and is prone to damage when docking. The repair of this flange is difficult.

Catalina uses a shoebox construction with fasteners integrated into the rub rail. This is the weakest of the 3.

None of these construction methods are especially robust, there is simply not enough hull to deck flange overlap but they are fine for 99.999999% of the sailing most of us encounter.
 

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Sounds like he worked hard for 5 days keeping it afloat.
I wonder what sort of Bene?

That northbound NZ passage is damn sticky at times, half a dozen boats lost on it one year about a decade ago.

I agree to remove and box all glass on a passage. Though I forgot last year and did 14 days upwind and didnt break a thing lololol

The boat must be secured for sea, but still in any knockdown the place will be a mess. But with broken glass just horrible!

He has done very well, and the boat has served him well, together, to keep afloat for five days before deciding to hit the Red Button.


AMVER is great! Unsung heroes in many, many rescues.
:D:D

Not drawing a comparison, directly, with Reble Heart, by cargo ships are not trained rescue experts like those navy dudes. Full credit to the ship and crew for doing something outside their expertise! Car carrier would have made a nice wind shaddow!!!
Saw the video! What a humble man and good sailor. I hope he will return to the sea.

I love happy ending.
 

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Discussion Starter #9 (Edited)
Another news clip - his ex is using a local Crown 34 to describe the hull/deck issue.. (sorry about the ads)




Good segment, this last one.. oddly he makes no mention of hull deck separation, but while afloat and upright he's still taking on too much water.

Looking forward to more detail if it comes....
 
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Nice to see a good outcome.
Interesting he is from SSI. don't know him but he looks familiar.

Rather than wondering why a Bene sank.

I'd be interested to know what equipment he used to send distress
presume it was an EPIRB.

Good job by the Kiwwi or Ausie AMVER.
 

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The timing of the trip is unusual. The general rule in NZ is that one does not leave until May and then with a weather window, because of the cyclone season. Sure he was hit it seems after a week, but a late March departure is unconventional. Even in good conditions one is likely to run into tough conditions at some point in that passage. Glad he was saved after what must have been a very difficult time especially singlehanded but he did push the envelope.
 

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Yes, by EPIRB.

HF radio was destroyed in the knock down. Solar and wind all went too. As well as his life raft! And still he worked for 5 more days to keep it going!

Well done!

Great video... The lower one with his talk.
 

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Catalina uses a shoebox construction with fasteners integrated into the rub rail. This is the weakest of the 3.

None of these construction methods are especially robust, there is simply not enough hull to deck flange overlap but they are fine for 99.999999% of the sailing most of us encounter.
No.

It depends on the model. Some of the older and smaller catalinas use your "shoebox" (external or rollover flange), but the c400 used an internal flange. It is glued together and then with an aluminum toe rail it is vertically t-bolted every 3 inches through the rail, cabin top, and hull. This very strong and independent of the rub rail. If i am not mistaken, most of the new 5 series use this- but the only previous boats that used it were the 400, 440, and 470. It makes a more expensive but stronger way to make a boat.
 

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thats how my islander is...quite strong but many leak potentials

the sandwich tlip with aluminum toe rail through bolted with 96 bolts every inch is a bear to fix but otherwise a decent design...

the deck has set holes or bolts to keep the hulls from spreading when redoing the toerails for example

so my question was what does bene use and why was it quoted that his hull deck joint give way? if it did it could be from using a weak joining method or if OLD and not repaired partly to blame for the no fixeable water intrusion
 

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Here's Catalina's own brochure...
Catalina Closer Look

Look, it's good that they've realized a shoe box hull to deck flange is weak (especially for a larger boat) but they are using a minimal inward turned flange, similar to the Beneteau. There's not a whole lotta overlap of flange to deck. It is not a robust construction. But like I said it's good enough for 99.99999% of the sailing most sailors do.

Curious though, how do you access a leaking bolt?


No.

It depends on the model. Some of the older and smaller catalinas use your "shoebox" (external or rollover flange), but the c400 used an internal flange. It is glued together and then with an aluminum toe rail it is vertically t-bolted every 3 inches through the rail, cabin top, and hull. This very strong and independent of the rub rail. If i am not mistaken, most of the new 5 series use this- but the only previous boats that used it were the 400, 440, and 470. It makes a more expensive but stronger way to make a boat.
 

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Beneteau uses an inward turned flange but minimal hull to deck overlap. There can be a fair amount of flex, think edge to edge. Like I've said several times it's good enough for most sailors but not robust enough for heavy ciclical loading. I'm not convinced some of the modern glues are great in shear.

thats how my islander is...quite strong but many leak potentials

the sandwich tlip with aluminum toe rail through bolted with 96 bolts every inch is a bear to fix but otherwise a decent design...

the deck has set holes or bolts to keep the hulls from spreading when redoing the toerails for example

so my question was what does bene use and why was it quoted that his hull deck joint give way? if it did it could be from using a weak joining method or if OLD and not repaired partly to blame for the no fixeable water intrusion
 

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there you go thanks...didnt see that before

see to me thats a no no, bummer
 
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