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https://www.yachtworld.com/boats/1988/o-day-35-3199803/?refSource=browse listing

David, Here's an example of a 35 ft. boat for $18,500, that appears to be in much better condition.

No one is going to pay $47,500 for that Ericson and then put another $40,000 into repairs. That engine would need to be lifted and re-mounted, with the support glassed in, not to mention the Wood and probable wet core.
 

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Discussion Starter #24
David, I take it you're in the market to buy a boat. Do you want a project boat?
Does anyone ever WANT a project boat?

I have cabinet maker skills but not engine skills.

Glass I can do as can just about anyone but who would want to.

To answer your question NO but like lots of people, I overestimate my abilities and underestimate the time it takes.
 

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....To answer your question NO .....
Then why explore what it would take to repair a hull like this one. Lots of good boats out there. Don't start with ones you question. A perfect boat will still give you plenty to do.

Good luck finding the right one.
 

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Discussion Starter #26
Then why explore what it would take to repair a hull like this one. Lots of good boats out there. Don't start with ones you question. A perfect boat will still give you plenty to do.

Good luck finding the right one.
Good point. I've seen about a dozen boats so far and they all have had something. I'm just trying to get a handle on what is SOMETHING and what is something.

And of course, the dream that I can parlay some skills I think I have into a deal.
 

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Does anyone ever WANT a project boat?
Yep - I just bought (another) one a couple of months ago.

I get a kick out of bringing back nasty old neglected stuff.
 
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I had a partnership in an Ericson. It's wood did not look nearly as bad as that one does and the deck core had severe core issues. By the time the interior wood looks like that, I would suspect the deck core. The damage to the bulkheads is severe, the core is questionable and the asking price does not reflect this highly questionable status. Keep looking.
 

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....And of course, the dream that I can parlay some skills I think I have into a deal.
In the spirit of helping you think through the process, you seem a little conflicted. You say you do not want a project boat, but you are looking for a boat at a good price that may need work you feel you have the skills to do.

I'd be careful. Boats that are at low cost and need real work, almost never are a good deal in the end. There is the rare opportunity and some who pull it off. They are, by far, the exception. A good deal can be one with solid bones, but needs to be thoroughly cleaned, painted or varnished, maybe some soft goods or a new set of sails or running rigging. That's it. If you start thinking about glass, wet, wood, motors, keels, etc, they typically go upside down quickly.
 

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David,

What we all are trying to tell you is that this boat doesn't have "good bones' left. You are looking at multiple King Cong's of 'somethings'. And you are looking at an owner whose asking price is way too much even if this boat was in perfect condition and well equipped.

I think that you have been given consistent advice by those of us who have been through the project boat experience, which is to keep looking. This one has no hope of ever being a contender.

Here's the deal, the way that boat is built, you will be taking much of the interior apart just to get to the connection between the bulkhead and the pan. That is a structural bulkhead that was installed before the deck was installed, so even getting a new bulkhead into place will be tough. If the face of the bulkhead looks that bad you can expect the base of the bulkhead to look far worse.

And the bulkhead is the easy repair compared to the likelihood that the deck core is shot.

And by time you deal with all of that, plus the interior trim on the cabin sides, the engine mounts, the head liner, and numerous things you can't see yet, even if you did a good job of it, you would be looking at a boat that would be worth maybe half of the asking price having put in a couple years of weekends putting her in shape.

The bigger point is that there's much nicer boats out there that you should be looking at, and not wasting your time on this one which is mediocre design, that has been abused past being worth consideration at almost any price.

Jeff
 

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Another consideration from the perspective of a fellow midwest dweller.

We are fortunate to have a fairly immense supply of nice boats floating around on our freshwater lakes compared to our sea dwelling brethren. Keep looking, there are a lot of great boats out there, you just need to find the right one.
 

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Like I said if its not already your boat then walk away otherwise fix the leaks along with the damage to structure and kill the mold spores before doing anything cosmetic to the woodwork inside the boat.

If the structural damage is too extensive on a boat you already own the best recourse may be to send it to the crusher and learn the lesson that small leaks eventually sink even great ships. Sad thing is too many total their boats through lack of maintenance ending up with a mortgage they are upside down on so they doctor them up so someone else will get stuck with the problem they created.

I see a lot of gutted project boats for sale around here purchased by folks who thought they weren't that bad and then found themselves with an empty hulled money pit that still requires more work than they can afford to deal with. They try to sell them for a few hundred dollars to make them go away and so they won't get stuck with the disposal fees or try to rid themselves of the liability by donating them to a charity.

What likely started out as a small issue requiring the replacement of a few screws and fixing up some caulking was allowed to spiral out of control on that one.
 

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I've had really good results by lightly sanding off any remaining varnish (or whatever), lightly bleaching the wood and then staining it to match the rest of the panel. You can varnish (or whatever) this and it is almost unnoticeable to any but the most intense scrutiny.
 
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Really, I think that's pretty obvious to all.
Hey Cap, why was this necessary? Zee provided an additional point, she wasn't challenging your input. Hope there isn't anything going on in your world causing the hair trigger. Cheers mate.
 
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many owners rebed everything only to find wet wet wet, yet again. itis not understood that the mast dish of aluminum has a tendency to after a few dozen years totally fail. repair canbe done for 2000 usd on upwards in dollars. is merely holding mast over dish replacing dic=sh and hoping core is clear not wet. is end grain balsa and doesnot epoxy well, a si learned. enjoy th eboat. is a good one, just do it right for maximal enjoyment.
my 35 was an awesome sailing boat.
 

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Discussion Starter #37
David,

What we all are trying to tell you is that this boat doesn't have "good bones' left. You are looking at multiple King Cong's of 'somethings'. And you are looking at an owner whose asking price is way too much even if this boat was in perfect condition and well equipped.
Thank you all. Boat off list.
 
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Thank you all. Boat off list.
A wise decision ... more grist for the mill ....
August 30th I surveyed a boat with mold like that. I have been dealing with painful skin rashes, lung infection and sinus infection ever since. Doc tells me up to a year to fully (maybe) recover.

Out of curiosity I looked into mold remediation on a 33' boat. The estimate I got was $10,000 and the guarantee was somewhat vague.
I will take mold more seriously from now on.
 
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A wise decision ... more grist for the mill ....
August 30th I surveyed a boat with mold like that. I have been dealing with painful skin rashes, lung infection and sinus infection ever since. Doc tells me up to a year to fully (maybe) recover.

Out of curiosity I looked into mold remediation on a 33' boat. The estimate I got was $10,000 and the guarantee was somewhat vague.
I will take mold more seriously from now on.
My family is involved with disaster relief and mold remediation so yes whether they call it mold or mildew its not to be taken lightly. In a home, if its in deep, it can involve stripping the house down to the studs/underlament with the complete interior including the drywall and insulation tossed into the dumpster by a crew clad in hooded/gloved/booted disposable dectam suits with full face NOSH respirators with the most contaminated items broken up and bagged before disposal. All upholstered and soft items along with books, paintings, photographs, documents and the like may also be considered a loss even though they appear intact. Some folks are hit really hard when they find their home stripped of everything except for the roof with just the tar paper on it and the framing left and sometimes even the underlayment on the walls and floors needs to go too leaving just a skeleton with a tar paper roof on it as all that can be saved.

Everything that's left in/of the building needs to be Hepa Vacuumed in a Sealed Hepa Filtered environment and either treated with Bleach, Ammonium Chloride or TriSodiumPhosphate in a Bone Dry Dehumidified environment.

Only the most important paperwork that can't be duplicated will be conserved along with just a portion of the family photographs, etc in a bad outbreak.

After an event that wets the interior of any space its very critical to act immediately to dry it out before there is a blossom of mold and mildew.

Families with young children and the elderly can be at high risk where there is mold and mildew involved and its sad that most do not act quickly at the very onset where eliminating the root cause of the dampness and fogging with TSP will stop it in its tracks with minimal loss and cleanup along with at a much lower cost. Think about the difference between acting quickly and paying for a few hundred dollars in de-humidification and TSP fogging expense (and the TSP will be food grade so you do not have to remove anything from the space except for any items highly contaminated with mold) compared to waiting until its a $10,000 remediation yet most still wait. Many times if you act right away all that may have to be removed before fogging is a highly contaminated item such as some cushions or a picture on a wall and perhaps some wallpaper on an exterior wall or in a kitchen/bathroom. Wallpaper especially vinyl can be a mold spore breeding ground so its recommended after remediation that no wallpaper be replaced.

There needs to be more awareness that when your dealing with mold its like dealing with a slow fire that is eating away at everything around it 24/7 until you put it completely out.

Hope your recovery is complete and speedy.
 

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A wise decision ... more grist for the mill ....
August 30th I surveyed a boat with mold like that. I have been dealing with painful skin rashes, lung infection and sinus infection ever since. Doc tells me up to a year to fully (maybe) recover.

Out of curiosity I looked into mold remediation on a 33' boat. The estimate I got was $10,000 and the guarantee was somewhat vague.
I will take mold more seriously from now on.
Wow, that's intense. I'll take your post as a serious warning, as I'm no spring chicken and a lung infection could be the death of me.
Best wishes on a speedy recovery.
 
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