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I guess Catalina direct sells something but i was wondering if anyone has other even better options for covering the lifelines. The old rubber on mine are hard cracking and coming off.
 

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I guess Catalina direct sells something but i was wondering if anyone has other even better options for covering the lifelines. The old rubber on mine are hard cracking and coming off.
Probably time to replace them on a SAFETY perspective, not Band-Aid them on a visual one.. These are a critical safety item and if the plastic coating is that far gone, the lifelines are also likely well beyond their useful safe life.

New lifelines are rarely coated so corrosion can, hopefully, get spotted BEFORE a failure.
 

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Agreed. Time for new lines altogether.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Upon inspection the area where the coating is torn the cable shows no rust nor splinters or breaks. That' s why i wanted to recover it. The vinyl is the only thing i see a fault in.
 

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What about just removing all the plastic coating. Most new boats are just the stainless cable, you might just need to wax yours to keep from staining. make sure there safe first.
 

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Second on removing the covering, it's a water trap anyway

Or consider replacing with textile rigging (Amsteel etc) I did mine and love it. Soft hand but strong, stronger than the steel it replaces. Lost a bit of weight. Cheaper than steel is, at least right now, thanks China. Make sure your stanchions are faired or put bushing in to anticipate chafe. There are discussions about textile lifelines in plenty, just search if interested
 

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as a temporary solution(my lifelines are toast in some places including the wire) is I have found very cheap galvanized wire covered in clear tubing down here

the only benefit of this would be you can see the water trap and you can replace before its too late and obvioulsy that its cheap

something like 11c a foot

I know its not a great solution but its not like its crap either...simple nicopress here and there and you are done

now if your wire is perfect then I have see people use a variety if things to cover up...

I have seen looseley fitted pvc pipe, white elctrical or rigging tape and cloth...

honestly likeother mention they should be free to breath and not covered just like your standing rigging isnt covered so thats that

id polish it up and leave it be
 

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What about just removing all the plastic coating. Most new boats are just the stainless cable, you might just need to wax yours to keep from staining. make sure there safe first.
As the underlying wire is likely 7 X 19, that might be a really bad idea :)

For bare wire, 1 X 19 or Dyform is the better way to go...
 

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If the wire is still good, strip them, and go old-school: "Worm and parcel with the lay, turn and serve the other way." :)

When dissected, 50-year-old rigging has been found to be as sound as the day it was installed. Old ways work.

"When iron wire superseded hemp, worming was of course no longer necessary; but parcelling and serving and tarring were still required to prevent rust, chafe and wear. Galvanizing merely delayed for a short while the inevitable corrosive effect of salt water. How well the service of wire fulfilled its purpose was amply demonstrated to me a few years ago. I had fallen heir to the standing rigging and assorted gear from an oyster sloop built in 1886 and dismantled after some 60 years of hard usage. Her shrouds were half-inch iron wire, parcelled and served throughout their length and set up with deadeyes and lanyards.

Out of curiosity, I removed the tar-stiffened marline and canvas from the lower end of one of the shrouds, and to my surprise the wire beneath was entirely free from rust and as bright and clean as new. It was hard to believe that after 60 years of exposure to the elements and continual drenching in salt water there was no deterioration, but from that same wire I made two bowsprit shrouds which now grace my 'Morning Star', then a-building.

... Many comparatively small cruising yachts are fitted with permanently-rigged lifelines of stainless wire rope, often of small diameter. They should be served throughout their length to give a better handhold and to lessen the chance of bodily injury if one should be thrown into them."
--- Hervey Garrett Smith, "The Arts of the Sailor".



<img src="https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/-9eE8wtr8ZfI/R2Emx0AQ9gI/AAAAAAAAAEw/UhtZtqJc8Ck/w765-h574-no/is_00230.jpg">

<img src="https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/-9WSPTBLMuEg/R2Emz0AQ9hI/AAAAAAAAAE4/bvPZv6JgSO4/w765-h574-no/is_00232.jpg">
 

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After doing a good inspection on my lifelines, it was apparent that they needed replacement. If yours are in similar condition, throw them out. If you can see corrosion around the swages and under the covering, it's time for them to go. I still have the recovering tubes I was going to use:) I went with Dyneema lifelines which has worked out really well. Was even able to use the old eyes and gates with a little creative rigging. The ends are lashed to the rails and are easily removable when in storage.
 

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Sailboat Reboot
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After doing a good inspection on my lifelines, it was apparent that they needed replacement. If yours are in similar condition, throw them out. If you can see corrosion around the swages and under the covering, it's time for them to go. I still have the recovering tubes I was going to use:) I went with Dyneema lifelines which has worked out really well. Was even able to use the old eyes and gates with a little creative rigging. The ends are lashed to the rails and are easily removable when in storage.
Pictures? Reference books? More info? Please! Thinking of doing the same and I would love to have the benefit of your experience.

Fair winds and following seas. :)
 

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Over Hill Sailing Club
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Pictures? Reference books? More info? Please! Thinking of doing the same and I would love to have the benefit of your experience.

Fair winds and following seas. :)
I don't have any good pictures but it was fairly simple to do. The 12 strand is very easy to splice. I took my gate hooks and threaded them directly into the eyes from the old wire system so that the result is a hook with an eye. This section is strung with a pc. of 3/8" Amsteel to the stern rail attachment. It has an eye spliced in which is about 6" short of the rail loop. In between the rail attachment and the Amsteel eye, I used smaller diameter (1/8"?) to lash with 4 loops and tie off. Amsteel DOES stretch over time so this lashing method works out very well and the 4:1 lashing lets you really tighten the lifelines nicely. On the bow section, I used the same method with a 3/8" s.s. shackle which acts as the stop at the gate stanchion and receives the gate hook. The lashing is the same up at the bow rail, using a long piece of small diam. line. I've had it on now for 4 years and it shows no signs of deterioration. The Amsteel seems to be really resistant to UV. Have also used it for my halyards and storm sail runners.

I know a picture would be helpful. Will see if I can find something.
 

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Over Hill Sailing Club
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Here's a grainy out-take from a photo, shows the gate:
 

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