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I'd be very concerned putting in a discontinued engine. "Solé Diesel marine engine MINI-44 V0 is discontinued. Engines MINI-44 V0 4 cylinders in line 42 HP (30,9 kW) 3000 RPM." This engine is on Mitsubishi base and I do not know if parts will be available in the US.
 

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seems like an odd choice if you are in Canada. if in Spain then then it might make since
I have heard of a number of people in the Vancouver area repowering with Sole engines because they are so cheap compared to Yanmar and Volvo. Presumably there is local support for them.

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Diesels require extremely complex and expensive emissions control systems to match the cleanliness of gasoline engines, they require complex and expensive turbocharging systems to bring their specific power output up to practical levels, the fuel costs tend to break even with gasoline engines (in the US), CO2 emissions tend to be about the same or sometimes worse.
Diesels had a lot less horsepower (but more torque) than comparable gasoline engines. Translation: they got moving briskly but then didn't accelerate nearly as quickly as gasoline-engined boats.
 

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Diesels require extremely complex and expensive emissions control systems to match the cleanliness of gasoline engines, they require complex and expensive turbocharging systems to bring their specific power output up to practical levels, the fuel costs tend to break even with gasoline engines (in the US), CO2 emissions tend to be about the same or sometimes worse.
Diesels had a lot less horsepower (but more torque) than comparable gasoline engines. Translation: they got moving briskly but then didn't accelerate nearly as quickly as gasoline-engined boats.
Why do you refer to diesels in the past tense? They are standard fare on sailboats, they don't necessarily have turbochargers or fancy emission control systems. They are far better suited to sailboats than gasoline engines are, hence you never see gas inboards any more.

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Diesels require extremely complex and expensive emissions control systems to match the cleanliness of gasoline engines, they require complex and expensive turbocharging systems to bring their specific power output up to practical levels, the fuel costs tend to break even with gasoline engines (in the US), CO2 emissions tend to be about the same or sometimes worse.
Diesels had a lot less horsepower (but more torque) than comparable gasoline engines. Translation: they got moving briskly but then didn't accelerate nearly as quickly as gasoline-engined boats.
speaking about misinformation. the Diesel engine in our sailboat could not be simpler to run and maintain the diesel engine in my truck could not run any smother and has plenty of power and get better milage then any other 1/2 ton truck. better milage and cheaper then gasoline is a win in my book. still have my 1950 diesel lawn mower and it runs like a top.
 

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require complex and expensive turbocharging systems
Most sailboat diesels do not have turbo chargers and even those that do, aren't required for power generation, they are for fuel efficiency, emissions or to cram more HP into a smaller footprint. Oddly, my last Volvo was 100hp, derated on a block that was used for the 150hp model and it still had a turbo. The turbo accomplished none of the above, lest maybe fuel efficiency, which is a near non-issue for sailboats. Talk about frustrating. At a certain horsepower (maybe 75ish and up), you can't find one without, but I'd greatly prefer one without. Especially after having rebuilt one and replaced another with new. They are pricey and require keeping the oil as clean as possible.
 

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Pretty sure Colby65 is talking about diesels in automobiles. Very different situation compared to the auxiliary engine in a sailboat. Especially as it relates to emission regulations.
 

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They are far better suited to sailboats than gasoline engines are, hence you never see gas inboards any more.
I'm not a particular advocate of gasoline engines on sailboats, but is that really true? Sailboat manufacturers used the Atomic 4 for decades and never tried again. The A4 was developed in the 1940s and was already pretty technologically long in the tooth by the time it hit its heyday in the 70s. Still, it was one of the most successful sailboat engines of all time and still has a cult following among some. And even as gasoline was declared unfit for inboard sailboat use, powerboats under 40 feet have continued to predominantly use gasoline engines. I'm not convinced that the 75 years of gasoline engine advancement since the A4 couldn't be brought to bear in creating a safe, reliable, economical modern gasoline sailboat engine. However, no boat or engine manufacturer has any incentive in the current market to try.
 

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Diesel fuel is far less flammable. You can generally throw a match on a puddle of diesel and it wouldn’t light, so inadvertent leaks in the engine compartment are very unlikely to ignite, before being identified. It also creates a fraction of the deadly CO from an exhaust leak. While it can still accumulate to deadly levels, it takes multiple times longer or higher concentrations, giving a far wider safety margin. I don’t see gasoline making a comeback on sailboats.
 
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