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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I really like sailing my simple 24 ft keelboat with 4 ft draft. I don't want anything bigger or more complex since I usually single hand and I am a minimalist.

The things that I don't like are:
1. Possibility of outboard malfunction if wind dies or rig fails or when I must navigate a crowded marina. I would like to be able to row out of shipping lanes or row into my slip at the marina.
2. Possibility of running aground. Would like an even shallower draft and would like to be able to beach the boat in an emergency, duck into the lee of a windward shore etc...
3. Dragging anchor at night - again the possibility of running aground.

I would just get an open boat with a center board, but I like sailing in the Puget Sound (cold water, occasionally rough wind and waves), and I would like a place to sleep/keep dry. I really like my 1400 pounds of ballast and my cabin. I want to be able to cross the Strait of Juan de Fuca and gunkhole in the San Juans. Not interested in blue water ocean passages etc..

Am I asking too much? I have learned that each sailboat is a series of compromises.

The SCAMP looks great, but I'm interested in a little more protected space and a boat perhaps less prone to capsize/knockdowns. Are there any seaworthy, swing keel or otherwise beach-able, boats that are also light enough to row but still have some shelter? Like a Cal 20 with a big-ass 900 pound swing keel (just kidding).

Has anyone crossed the Strait in a SCAMP, a Potter, a Montgomery or something like that?
 

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One of None
Hunter 34
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1, if you really did have 3 fails when navigating a marina.. DROP the hook call or wait for help.

2, 4ft is not shallow draft.

3, learn how to set anchor sleep all night!

The dream can come true. (i think the co. folded though)


Oh # 4! learn how to sail on and off a dock!
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 · (Edited)
Denise-

Learn how to read. Read my post again. Then learn how to type. Then offer a useful suggestion if you feel so inclined.

I didn't have three fails, I think I used the word "possibility".

And thanks, I already know that 4 feet is not a shallow draft, hence my question about good swing keel sailboats.
 

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One of None
Hunter 34
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One of my most respected sailing friends once showed me how to sail jib only, in the dark, in a crowded marina with only the hare's breath of a summer evening; while there was a line wrapped around a prop. "How did you do that?" I asked. "Denise, just be patient" we came up on a mooring and casually picked it up. Later, the line came off the shaft with a pull while tapping the starter in reverse.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
One of my most respected sailing friends once showed me how to sail jib only, in the dark, in a crowded marina with only the hare's breath of a summer evening; while there was a line wrapped around a prop. "How did you do that?" I asked. "Denise, just be patient" we came up on a mooring and casually picked it up. Later, the line came off the shaft with a pull while tapping the starter in reverse.
That's really good sailing and seamanship you describe.

But I started this thread to learn more about swing keel sailboats that can be rowed and beached, and that have some sort of cabin. I'm really interested in learning about this specific topic. Any suggestions?
 

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One of None
Hunter 34
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Cat boats, sharpies, mutihulls, bilge keelers (British are way ahead of us on that)

Have you ever tried to row in a blow? Or even try to row off a beach into wind and wave? I tried in my sea kayak years ago. and decided to wait it out.
shallow to no draft is always at loss of
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Have you ever tried to row in a blow? Or even try to row off a beach into wind and wave?
No. When there is wind I sail. The rowing would be for when there is no wind or the rig fails. Or when I am trying to go through the Ballard locks - not allowed to sail in and out of the locks.

But you are right. Rowing into strong wind and waves is difficult.

Thanks for the boat suggestions. Webb Chiles apparently circumnavigated in an open Drascombe Lugger 18 footer. But I am not that tough. I would like more shelter. He got knocked down and pooped several times. I'd like to avoid that.
 

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One of None
Hunter 34
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I don't know if it's even possible to sail off a beach with sails up. Most beach sailors, I think would raise them when they are "out there"

If you are going for shallow draft the trade off, usually means "non self righting" great in warm water.. no fun in cold.

I would intentionally learn what it takes, to take a boat over in various conditions rather then avoid the possibility. But, do any of us really try that?

My O30 has never knocked down (yet), and has rounded up when ever we were hit with a heavy gust. My H23 (Hunter) scared me one day on the river when a squaw hit us. laid us over to starboard with water at the winches. The boat just headed for shore without anyone "in charge" all while still on a starboard run of about 60 degrees!

Rigs generally don't fail.. maintenance fails them.

Suggest you join the wooden boat forums, way more talk about row/sail boats there. you don't have to have a wooden boat.
 

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Go take a look at the traditional sailboats over at the Wooden Boat Center on lake Union for some ideas.
 

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Chrysler 20 is a great little boat, with a heavy swing keel and a decent cabin. Probably the biggest boat I would want to row or scull. But I do not like the rudder on it (fixed spade).
Mirage 5.5m (I have one of those now) is nice and fast, with a folding transom mounted rudder, but not stable enough for rough weather.
But something like this would probably be better, not a swing keel but very shallow draft with lots of ballast: SOVEREIGN 17 sailboat specifications and details on sailboatdata.com
 

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Commodore Munroe's 'Egret' is known for being seaworthy.

" The difficulties of beach travel being thoroughly realized, and the Weather Bureau having established a telegraph line to Jupiter, it seemed imperative that something in the boat line superior to any of the existing craft for this work should be obtained. So in the summer of 1886, to replace Kingfish, I had built at Brown's the 28-foot double-ended sharpie lifeboat, Egret, very strongly but lightly constructed. She drew eight inches, and had only fifty to seventy-five bricks, laid under the floor, for ballast. She was fitted with all the appurtenances needed to keep the sea in almost any weather, and if necessary to be put on the beach without harm. That she fulfilled all requirements until the first road was opened the older residents can testify. "
(excerpted from 'The Commodore's Story', by Ralph Middleton Munroe and Vincent Gilpin - Historical Society of Southern Florida)


'Little Egret' Designer Ross Lillistone Thread
 

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One of None
Hunter 34
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Row & paddle need not be muscle vs the sea. The experienced know it's more about knowing how rather then how strong his or her arms are. Higher cadence, short & quick slight pull torso driven, is more efficient then long strong back breaking strokes!

Shorter strokes miss the water less then long reaching strokes.
 

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Sea Sprite 23 #110 (20)
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If you do not mind building them yourself.. John Welsford has several CB boats with cabins that are extremely skinny water able with the board up.

Pathfinder is available with a cabin.

The rest are designed that way.. such as Sweet Pea, Smack, Tread Lightly, and my favourite of the bunch, Penquin.

Also Chesapeake light Craft has their "pocket ship"
 
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