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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
to cover the cost of a slip/mooring/maintenance
 

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I assume if you are planning on renting out a room on your boat, you are never planning on leaving the slip. If I were a tenant, I would be pretty annoyed if I couldn't count on my house being there when I got home.
 

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I've never understood the point of living aboard a boat, if it's never leaving the slip.

The OP may be the exception to the rule, but those boats often start looking overloaded and poorly maintained. Neighbors, both on land and in the water, start resenting those boats. Again the OP may be the exception.

But, if not, I would think it would be hard to find a roommate as well. Boats fill up with junk fast. Also, while it's been decades since I had a roommate, you can't help but get on each others nerves from time to time. In a few hundred crowded square feet, that would be amplified.

Good luck.
 

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A lot of couples who are/have been deeply in love split up because they try to live together on a boat. Why would you subject yourself to that kind of thing with a perfect stranger?

Just sayin'

-Chris
 

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I think it would be far less expensive if you just rented a studio apartment. You'll also have more room and less to worry about during strong storms and winter months.
 

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I've never understood the point of living aboard a boat, if it's never leaving the slip.



Good luck.
Allow me to explain-

There are a lot of people trying to play "beat the rent" by living on derelict boats in marinas, on mooring balls and at anchor.

These people are not interested in sailing or boating. They are in search of cheap rent (or free) and not paying property taxes. These people are the reason for the ever-restrictive anchoring laws in Florida and elsewhere.
 

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Re: Anyone ever rent a cabin?

to cover the cost of a slip/mooring/maintenance
Assuming you mean renting out part of your cabin space, I've witnessed it firsthand at the marina I lived at.

It's called "sub-letting" and unless it's allowed in your written marina contract, you are in violation of your contract or "lease".

We had a fellow on a medium size motor cruiser sub-letting his cabin space to various people. When the marina owner discovered this, his contract was voided and the boat owner evicted from the marina. Here's the fun part: As a liveaboard, you are NOT entitled to all the legal eviction protections that a dirt-based apartment tenant is entitled to. If the marina owner wants you out, he can evict you nearly immediately.

I can tell you that your fellow liveaboards in the marina are NOT going to be pleased with you, if you rent out your cabin space to various non-boating transients. These people are often poor neighbors, untidy, and prone to petty theft.

The liveaboard community is pretty tight, and looks after each other. They will likely not tolerate this shifty behavior. We sure didn't.
 

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Pupil, I got to ask: What is a “CNA- Residential Counselor”? I’m just curious if it is some sort of college residence advisor. I don’t think that there are very many opportunities to rent a boat as that would preclude the owner from using it himself. You could try putting out “boat sitter” advertisements at your local Marianas and on the “looking for crew – crew available” websites. Again, I think it is a longshot. I know that larger (motor) yachts look for “cabin attendants” from time to time but that is mainly a housekeeping/busboy/nanny type of job and they really look for experienced (i.e. licensed) crew to service the engines, line handling, maintenance, cleaning etc. I admire your pluck and you are certainly are thinking out of the box. Keep thinking of ideas and we will get you on the water somehow.
 

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When we were in Antigua during the Classics and Race week, some boaters in English Harbour were renting out beds on a bed and breakfast basis as accommodation ashore was very difficult to find or very expensive
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I’m just curious if it is some sort of college residence advisor
no, no - just trying to figure out ways of making money on a boat-
 

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So, you still haven't told me what you do for a living. Kind of hard making money on a pleasure boat. You probably will have more luck on the commercial side. Have you thought about getting your seaman's papers and union card?
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
I’m just curious if it is some sort of college residence advisor
No, not at all. just trying to figure out how I can eliminate the costs of living on a boat.
 

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Pupil, it would certainly help to let people know what kind of boat you have. Or, are you thinking of buying one to live on?

You might have luck in approaching a sailing school the needs a training vessel for courses like coastal cruising, docking, advanced coastal cruising etc. That would mean that you'd need to keep the boat pretty uncluttered and ready to sail, and you'd have to find somewhere else to stay when it's in use by the school. I doubt you'd live rent free, but it could help defray some costs. Of course it depends on whether the boat is sound and well maintained. It would be seasonal income, at best, in Mass.
 

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Keep in mind that if you make money on your boat and it ever leaves the dock then you likely need to have a Coast Gard license. At least a 6 pack (6 passenger) license. I have thought about getting a bigger boat so I can host guests more often, but not to make money off of. I think a sailboat would be a really bad way to try to go about it. You might want to contact Doug at Sailing Charters | Boston | Triumph Charters he tries to make money doing charters, but I am not sure it is an entirely profitable business. You really have to hustle to make a charter business actually make money, think working 7 days a week. Also I believe that one of the Marinas in Boston (It may be Constitution Marina) offer a boat-bed and breakfast but I don't think there is anyone aboard, and they may be physically disabled in some way to keep renters from taking off in them. So you might look into that. But in order to actually rent a room I think you might need to get a very large boat (if you want quality tenants) and that will make it even harder to make money at it.

The easier thing to do would be to get a smaller boat to reduce costs. Of course the North East is not the best place to try to boat affordably.
 
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