SailNet Community banner

1 - 20 of 23 Posts

·
*starboard*
Joined
·
495 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Just wondering if anyone shoots with a nikon d90 on their boat? How has it been for you, has it held up to the abuse.

I am also looking at the d300, canon 50d.

Thanks!
 

·
*starboard*
Joined
·
495 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
It does help! My biggest concern is the "weather sealing" that other models like the canon 50d or signifigantly more expensive d300 offer. I need something that can take some abuse so that I'm not wary of taking it around with me.
 

·
NON member
Joined
·
544 Posts
merlin...

Our boat is a wet-sailing daysailer in anything more than 15kts, as the shoal lake we're on gets very choppy very quickly.

On nice days, I keep the camera in a Tupperware container behind the cockpit seat, under the gunwale. On not nice days, it stays in the camera bag, in the cabin!!! Unfortunately, that means missing some of the nicest action shots.

So, until I win the lottery and can afford a waterproof camera with decent lens...

Paul
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
6,762 Posts
Have used

Have used a D-70 and currently use my wife's D-40 and my D-200. The D-200 is more water resistant, like the D-300, but I have honestly never had a problem with moisture on a Nikon body. I pretty much treat my cameras like a tool, use them hard, and it's why I shoot Nikon. IMHO Nikon bodies are tougher and hold up better than Canon.

If they get wet with salt spray I wipe them down with a freshwater dampened microfiber rag. My D-200 is going on its fourth or fifth year and the D-40 it's third summer. I still bring the D-70 too and use it as my dedicated wide angle lens camera. The D-70 has many boat seasons..
 

·
Handsome devil
Joined
·
3,479 Posts
I also shoot with a D70 but I have the cheap "came in the kit" lenses..I pretty much just use the 55-200 zoom full time on boat trips and my camera is 6 years old now and still going strong.
I cant say it has seen much salt spray though as I am carful with it pretty much just using a 100.00 Kodak point and shoot camera for thoes risky shots.

I have wished at times I went with Canon instead... as I believe they focus better then Nikon for fast action like Soccer..but it could be just the cheap lenses that they bundled with the camera...If you go Nikon dont by a kit like I did..buy everything separately and spend the extra bucks on good glass..you wont be sorry you did.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
73 Posts
Yes, I bought it at the end of last year. My pics are in the webpage in my signature.

It's held up pretty well, I had one wave splash over the cabin top and into my open camera case and it still works. And we are saltwater sailors. The on off switch seems a little less smooth when I switch it, but honestly it works fine, and it could be in my (paranoid) imagination. The camera guy at the camera store recommended wiping everything down with rubbing alcohol after the wave incident.

I'm thinking about getting an underwater case for it so I don't have to worry so much, but it's the 2nd DSLR I've consistently taken with me when we go out sailing, so I've taken every step short of that to keep the camera safe.

We recently were loaned a small (wet) boat that I could use. I sometimes get distracted by taking pictures on our current boat and my sailing skills are not where I'd like them to be. So the expectation is that the smaller boat will help me learn the basics. When I improve my skills, I might get this Olympus to use on the smaller boat.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
73 Posts
Did you ever consider the d300 or now the d300s?
I did before the D90 came out (my first DSLR was a refurbished D50). I think of camera bodies kind of like computers ...you know in a few years they will be better, faster, and tie your shoes for you. So I got the least expensive camera that would meet all my needs. I heard great reviews about the D90 (not the video part so much, but everything else was pretty positive). Full frame seems to be the next step, and if that carries over to the prosumer side in a few years, it won't be as big a deal for me to step up.

Unless you are a professional photographer, then I am not the person to ask.:)

From my reading, it seems like lenses are the place to make the big investment. You'll upgrade your camera, but still continue to use the same lenses. Lens technology doesn't seem to move as quickly, and reselling them is a more financially lucrative option. (For example, if I was going to sell the camera/lens package I bought in 2006, you'd probably be more interested in buying the 18-70mm lens vs buying the D50 camera body).

DPReview is one pretty good resource and is worth checking out if you are shopping around. It's a big investment in a hobby (much like boating), you want to go with whatever works best for you.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,000 Posts
I drag my Canon 5D everywhere. I have been rafting in Alaska and on a 12 meter ride in Hawaii as well as it is always on my Pearson. She is not a wet boat and I have a dodger. Have never had a failure or problem other than trying to take a lighthouse shot with a 400 mm lens on a pitching boat (even the IS didn't help). Depending on where I am going I take different lenses. All the Canon L lenses are weather sealed as long as you have a filter on the front. If I was really going to be in the wet a lot I would get the 1Ds MkIII body. I love full frame.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
967 Posts
D300, D200, D70 and Panasonic Lumix DMX-5

I shoot profesionally; well sort of, I have side business of sports/action shots.

Anyway, I have taken all of my Nikon's on my Pearson without issue. All of my cameras have seen pouring rain, sun, snow, and all have survived.

However, for normal boat stuff I use a Panasonic Lumix DMX-5. It takes pretty good quality photos, but better yet it takes HD video that is stunning. All for $200 and it fits in your pocket. Yes, it not the super camera, but if it breaks or fall over, it isn't the end of the worlds.

DrB
 

·
HANUMAN
Joined
·
2,837 Posts
A small weather proof point and shoot such as my Olympus SW or Canon D10 model is worth the investment. The photo's will not be "DSL great", but, when you can pull it out of your shirt pocket at the helm in a rain storm, during Songkran in Thailand, flying down hill on a mountain bike in Cambodia, on a hobie 16 in Mexico, etc. you will get some pics you would surely miss with better gear.

I'm far from an expert, but, thanks to a small, waterproof, shockproof camera, I have some pics that are pretty wild.

Keep in mind my standards are lower. My "good camera" is just a Canon S5 IS, so I'm far from a pro. I know my way around an SLR, I just can't travel with all the gear.

JMHO, Sail
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
180 Posts
I've snagged some really nice pictures over the years with my little Canon SD60 in the optional Canon waterproof dive case that I couldn't have gotten with any water susceptible camera (shots of spray coming over the bow and straight for you in rough weather as one example)...
 

·
October Moon B43
Joined
·
400 Posts
The bodies of the D200/D300 and up are sturdier (meta vs plastic) than the
D40 thru 90 series. They're made with the expectation they'll be used by pros or high end amatuers photographers. Our daughter is a pro photographer and carried the D200 ( now I have it :) ). She now uses a D300 and D700. She's had them get wet, dropped them and generally banged around without a problem. They can and do take a lot of abuse. If you're serious about your pictures and have the money I'd go with the D300 versus the D90. There's more than just a sturdy body that goes with it. They take better pictures in a variety of conditions, have different capabilites and just are awesome cameras. The difference in picture quality is readily apparent. Do a search on the D90 and D300 camera tests. There should be a host of them that will describe features and capabilities. Good luck with your decision.
Mike
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,378 Posts
I use a Nikon D200. I am very pleased with it. I have never gotten it wet though, so I cannot comment on that part. I do carry a Kata camera cover, but have found little opportunity to carry.

I used to use a point and shot Fujipix S5000, but the shutter lag resulted in my losing pictures. I was took 100 pictures of Dall's porpoises and got two usable ones.

D200 for last week

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
249 Posts
I've carried out my Canon 40D a few times with no damage. I worried about this a lot, and came to the conclusion that I have the camera to take pictures, and many of my best opportunities are on the water. IMHO, The worst thing you can do to an expensive camera is leave it at home :)

On a similar topic, though, I've found it difficult to move around on board with a large camera. What tricks have people used here? I'd like some way to keep it on my person, but leave my hands free and not have it whacking things if I have to move quickly.
 

·
Waiting For Spring
Joined
·
424 Posts
I have a Canon Rebel XT I have had for years, my first DSLR. I also have a 50D. The best part? My EF 70-300mm f/4.5-5.6 DO IS USM, EF 17-40mm f/4L USM & EF 24-70 mm f/2.8 L USM lenses fit on both bodies. If I am a little worried about the camera I use the XT, if I am not then I use the 50D. I also have an Olympus Stylus 1030SW for underwater shots and as a pocket camera when I have my kit stored.

I agree, whats the point of having a camera if you are never going to use it?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
107 Posts
I freelance as a photographer and I've always shot Nikon because of the abuse they can take.

The camera I learned on was my father's old FE which had been through Halifax races and tons of time around salt water/grit and still works great today over thirty years after it was made without ever needing a new part or repair even after all the "love" I've given it.

Of course, they don't entirely make them like they used to. I agree with the previous poster. If you have the budget, the D300 or D700 are both excellent cameras which give spectacular low light results and have very rugged designs. A D200 will have the same ruggedness with rather poor low light performance, but a much more agreeable price on the used market.

Remember, lenses make %90 of the difference in terms of image quality and also durability. Don't skimp on the lens! A single focal length "prime" lens will stand up to a great deal of abuse versus a plasticky kit zoom.

Keep shooting!
 
1 - 20 of 23 Posts
Top