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Closet Powerboater
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The Aladdin Mantle Lamp Company

I've been thinking one of these would be really nice to have. I've heard that they are as bright as a pressure lantern without the parts or noise. Anyone have one on board? My only concern is that the mantle might be brittle.

MedSailor
 

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the pointy end is the bow
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I've thought about getting one myself. We had friends who had one in their camper. It was as bright as a coleman type lantern. They're expensive though! They also put out a considerable amount of heat.
 

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Closet Powerboater
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I've thought about getting one myself. We had friends who had one in their camper. It was as bright as a coleman type lantern. They're expensive though! They also put out a considerable amount of heat.
Expensive... well yes and no. Yes they are expensive, but compared to the trawler style lamps you see on lots of boats, they're likely much more functional and cheaper too. But then again, those things are just a huge rip-off.

MedSailor
 

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Aspiring to be a Mexican
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They take a lot of time. I lived with them for almost 3 years, I got really tired of trimming the wicks and smelling kerosene. I tried using 1/2 diesel and 1/2 kerosene, don't do it unless you want everything in your boat a couple shades darker. On pure kerosene when they're perfect they produce probably the nicest most comfortable light ever, just beautiful to read by. They're only perfect for 15-20 minutes at a time and then it's time to fiddle with them again. I'll try LED this time when I get another boat. I never tried real lamp oil, I was young & too poor to get the best of some things. It may be much better with the right stuff.
Also, the wicks and mantles aren't cheap. It seems that I spent about equal amounts on wicks and mantles as I did on kerosene? It's been a long time.
All in all, kind of like living on a boat. Finicky, beautiful, needy, and more costly than you expected.
And satisfying.
 

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Just for the fun of it, I've a 20 year old Chinadin kerosene lamp onboard. Its probably same as the Aladdin lamp but made in China. :):):)
 

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I have a cheap oil lantern, I saw the aladins, but the price was too high for me. $10 from a discount store and it keeps the bugs away.
 

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I've only owned mine for six months, but I like it very much. It's bright and quiet, it does not smoke or smell. The mantle was crumbling when I got the boat, I replaced it. The boat was in enough of a sea to bounce the men in the V-berth, the lamp was fine. It does produce radiant heat, we used it to warm and dry in heavy rain.
 

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Alladin lamps

The biggest problem I have with an Alladin is the amount of heat they put out. Although great to warm up the cabin,unless I put it on the cabin sole I start to scorch the paneling above it...even on low.
 

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I have one at our off-grid cabin. I will second the thought that they require a lot of fussing, and the mantles are fragile and expensive. The biggest problem I've had is, because they're interesting, other people futzing with them and screwing them up to the point of me having to replace mantles, wicks, etc. So if you get one, learn how to use it and make the rule that NO ONE EVER TOUCHES THE LAMP BUT YOU. Threaten them with keelhauling if necessary.

The other issue is the heat. They throw off a considerable amount of heat. Which, at certain times of the year is a nice plus, but other times not so much. Make sure you have good ventilation and use a high quality kerosene, or you'll smell like a fuel oil truck. Properly trimmed, properly adjusted and with proper fuel they're not smelly or sooty at all. They are nice and bright, but I think that for a boating application, I might want something else.
 

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I had one ion my small, 24' RV. Darn thing was too tall to put under the stove vent, and with a dog with me I couldn't put it on the floor. The only way to use it was to have the fold out table opened up. It threw enough heat to make that tin box almost comfy while camping deep in the redwoods one cold January weekend.

I'd like to describe what can happen when things go out of whack on these wonderful lights. I fell asleep while reading by that wonderful light and woke up thinking I had been invaded by tiny flying insects. Once fully awake I realized the lamp was spewing bits of carbon around like a Lawrence Welk bubble machine. What a mess.

Great lamps, but not for the inattentive, or those with low ceilings,

Mike
 

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I did buy a large brass oil lamp and drilled and mount a small DC socket where the wick would go and then I installed a Sensibulb inside of the lamp. I added a decorative chain and use that to run the wires along and hung it over the table in the main cabin. Great light, looks good with low amp draw.
 

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We use one, though I forget who it is made by. It is actually a real anchor lamp and can be used as such. We have always had them aboard and used to use them for light at night without worrying about power. They are also great with a glass of wine.

You can buy the lamp oil at Walmart and it puts out minimum smoke. They do get hot at the end, so be careful before grabbing hold.

Just a word of warning, as I noticed many replies were from campers, on a baot these things get really banged around. Those nice fancy ones with the pretty glass will not last the first storm or Sport Fish.... whichever comes first. Make SURE that it is a nautical grade and if cannot easil (or at all) spill which flipped over, has thick glass, and is well protected. Otherwise your feet will not appreciate you.

I think they have a place on a boat and enjoy mine a lot.

- CD
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I've only owned mine for six months, but I like it very much. It's bright and quiet, it does not smoke or smell. The mantle was crumbling when I got the boat, I replaced it. The boat was in enough of a sea to bounce the men in the V-berth, the lamp was fine. It does produce radiant heat, we used it to warm and dry in heavy rain.
Wandering star, is your gimbaled or wall mounted? I wonder if that would make a difference to the mantel surviving.

Sounds like they are really finicky... Good to know. The height shouldn't be a problem as I've got about 7' of headroom, and the heat is usually a plus.

Anyone else able to run it for an hour or 2 without fussing with the wick?

MedSailor
 

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I have used antique and modern Alladin lamps most of my 50+ years, at the cabin, camping, and at home during power outages. They do produce quite a bit of heat, and the replacement mantles have become more expensive over the years. With the wick properly trimmed and adjusted, they will burn all evening with the only adjustment being to brighten or dim the light.

The mantles, once lit the first time, become just so much ash, but being protected by the chimney will last a long time with reasonable care.

Hung from the ceiling with a smoke-bell they should be fine in a boat. I would be concerned that the heat produced might be a bit much for gimbaled or bulkhead-mount. We usually keep them a couple of feet from a wall or combustible material.

I usually add about 1/2oz rubbing alcohol to the best kerosene and get very little odor.


YMMV
Donnie
 

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Mine is fixed mounted to the bulkhead, with a smoke bell. It has a tall narrow chimney. I burn mineral spirits in it, which was recommended by an oil lamp website.
 

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CD,
That isn't an Aladdin. That looks like a Den Haan kerosene anchor light.

From my understanding, there are at least three functional types of kerosene lamps

1) A liquid candle, like what CD is showing.
2) A petromax style pressurized one. Most people are familiar with a Coleman camping lantern
3) An Aladdin. It is non-pressurized but has a mantle like the pressure one. The wick sits below the mantle and the flame burns inside of the mantle and causes the mantel to incandesce
 

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dgr,

you are correct with the three different types of kerosene (coal oil) lamps. I also have a #2 in brass. What a beaut, and what noise.

Lighting is fun, check the fuel level, pressurize. Fill the cup with alcohol, light, wait for it to almost burn out, turn on kero and hope the generator is hot enough to vaporize it. Insert ear plugs. Produces light and heat comparable to the Coleman white gas lanterns. Mine is a single mantle.

man that thing is loud!
 
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