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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My P28-2 is on the hard getting the bottom redone. The hull was taken down bare to inspect and fill any hidden dings prior to the barrier coat and ablative paint. While there were a few spots of gelcoat crazing, the base of the keel stub (hull to stub transition) shows a bit of crazing, if not fine cracking around the joint. It's being looked at by the yard and a surveyor... meanwhile, I can't find any information on how Pearson built this line of boat's bilge/stub structure: are there stringers, some sort of plate or wood (I hope not given how that plagues catalinas) under the bilge glass matting to add strength?

Anyone know?
 

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ASA and PSIA Instructor
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I believe the P28-2 is a sister design to the P31-2. The P31-2 does not have a keel stub as the keel bolts directly to the hull bottom, and the bottom is supported by the lower part of the interior hull liner, which is a formed solid fg egg crate frame. I have heard not much noise of problems with the hull/keel connection although you could search
for owner comments.




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One of None
Hunter 34
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Ultrasound x-ray technology is possibly a way to find out but for mere mortals only way to find out what's going on with your keel and keel stub is.... to drop the keel!
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Denise. Aware. Valid. But dropping the keel still won‘t describe the construction. It'll just show the stub’s mating surface. What lies beneath is of interest and hence my query of construction. And the cold war surplus x-ray machine I bought on e-bay has instructions written in cyrillic and leaks a fluid that glows… so not using that. Seeking construction info. 😁
 

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One of None
Hunter 34
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Nice you know the answer to your own question but yes you can tell by dropping the keel because the bolt holes are usually large enough that you can see a cross section of the construction that they pass through. And there are ways of seeing through with modern technology ultrasound being one although not really a reliable way of inspection but nobody really wants to drop a keel
 

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ASA and PSIA Instructor
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Denise. Aware. Valid. But dropping the keel still won‘t describe the construction. It'll just show the stub’s mating surface. What lies beneath is of interest and hence my query of construction. And the cold war surplus x-ray machine I bought on e-bay has instructions written in cyrillic and leaks a fluid that glows… so not using that. Seeking construction info. 😁
Again, assuming the construction of the P28-2 is the same as the P31-2 (and P33-2 with which I am familiar), there is no stub, and any aspect of the lead keel's attachment to the solid fiberglass hull, and the all fiberglass load-bearing interior grid attachment to the hull, is 100% percent visible to your eyes once you pull up the floorboards. If there is no delamination in the hull and no separation or damage to the grid, the only other thing you might looking into is the condition of the bolts themselves. Maybe you should post a picture of the "stub" you are concerned about as with the sister designs, the top of the keel butts directly against the hull skin.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Sailingfool, it has a stub. So apparently a different style of construction than the larger -2 series. I‘ll post a pic later. And thank you for the link to the group. Its hard to discerne what’s under the bilge fiberglass matting without opening it up. There is the slight contour of some structure. I’m just a fan of being as informed as one can prior to open hull surgery if thats required.

Denise, I was being cheerfully facetious in commiserating the fact I’m a fellow mere mortal too when it comes to the degree of $ or access to high end NDI instruemnts. All said in good cheer. Hence the smiley face…. I agree looking in the bolt holes will reveal the immediate strata of the structure of the stub where the holes pass, but won’t guarantee it‘ll describe how the stub itself is mated to the hull, which is what I‘m curious about. It might sure help. Then again, dropping the keel just might answer all my questions. But then why have a chat board to see if anyone else knows something to share? I didn‘t answer my own question.

My original question was “does anyone know?” Not “how to find out…” That‘s known. But thank you for your recommendations.

Kind regards
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Here’s a pic… lead keel, stub, hull…. I don‘t have a pic of the bilge, but it is unmolested. But I’ll take one early this week next time I‘m at the boat.
 

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I don't know for sure on your boat but boats build in the 80's with type of keel stub were just solid glass layed up in the mold. if any wood or metal was added it would be after the bulk of glass was played in the mold. you have the dimensions of the keel width and depth on the outside of the boat which can be compared to the dimensions on the inside of the boat to get a close picture of the thickness of the glass. the cracks in the gelcoat at the keel stub to hull are common and if you are worried then you need to grind off the gelcoat to see if they go beyond the gelcoat.
 

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One of None
Hunter 34
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Looks pretty good! at least better than most! Does anybody know apparently nobody knows. I've been researching keel stub construction over the years myself there is no clear evidence of how they were built. Pearson O'Day Catalina there's no way to know except that Catalina did use plywood in the bottom of their keel stubs during the '80s. Also if the boat has spent any of it life and actually in the water is probably time for new keel bolts anyhow. Yes I picked up on your humor I just didn't respond to it like I usually do! And smileys and emoticons don't always show on this site!
I'm having my boat to be surveyed tomorrow August 2nd it's a hunter 34 the keel bolts are in about an inch and a half diameter! with stainless steel plates, reading about hunters I found that they coat it the bolts with epoxy and set the iron keel in epoxy which makes me wonder after almost 30 years what's going on down there but the joint looks tight except fwd edge. We'll see what the surveyor says.
139970
 
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