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first sailed january 2008
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm going from somewhere in Washington to San Francisco. I'm learning that it may be harder than I will be ready for in August. I'm going to start exploring my options, so I'm not caught off guard. I also like to have a backup plan.

So there are two possibilities, I tow, or hire someone to tow. I have a 5400 pound boat, probably with gear 6000. 4 foot draft fixed keel, 8 foot beam.

If I hired a truck, I could meet them in Olympia Washington. That's about 700 miles to SF. Has anyone hired a truck? Is it a hard process? Was it expensive? I can't even begin to guess the costs. $2000 plus haulout and in?

I also have an SUV. I have to find out my engine's specific gear ration, but it is rated to tow somewhere between 6900-7900 pounds. I read there are 3 gear setups for this engine. I have no trailer. Does one buy or rent?

Any info will help me get things ready and make an informed decision come September. Thanks.
 

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Sign up for uship.com put your start and finish in and see what the quote is. Doesn't cost you nothing unless you accept the offer. I did this for a boat I was thinking of buying and it went from $550 down to $350 but I didn't buy it. I did find a boat on CL and the same thing $500 to $300. I had no problems. I am sure there are horror stories, I just don't have one.
 

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on the truck....you can count on at least $1.50 or more, per mile round trip. Then you have load and unload fees and wait time. IF the yard can roll over the truck bed and lift, else a crane or some way to off load the boat. Permits and travel fees as well.

Your SUV might be up to the task, but you too, will have fuel costs and such. same deal for getting the boat on and off the trailer/cradle/etc. You would have to find a trailer. I have never been keen on renting a trailer, unless you know it is in tip top shape and that it will fit your boat exactly. You can burn up a lot of time fitting an unknown trailer to your boat, and if you don't do it correctly, you can damage the boat, or trailer, or both.

Uship it might be an option, I would not use them, as they have not shown up at critical times when I contracted with them to move a household, and even worse taken weeks to do something that should have been days. If you use them, do your homework...there is a reason they are bottom dollar cheap.
 

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Freedom isn't free
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If your SUV can truly haul 6900, to 7900lbs it must be one helluva SUV (Tahoe, Suburban sized)...

figure #7000, if your empty boat is #6000, probably MORE... A trailer rated to well over #6000 would work if you were going to tow it yourself. Surge brakes for sure, or better e-brakes.

I personally wouldn't want to tow #7000 or more with an SUV. I'd rather have a F250/2500 sized truck (longbed, extended/crew cab preferred for wheelbase). It's doable yourself, but a lot of rental trucks are OK to tow that much, but some won't allow you to, it's a question for the rental place.

The big deals towing are de-masting (as opposed to dis-masting)... and securing the boat well (straps, lashings, etc). A lot of people make the mistake of leaving outboards on the boats (that's a lot of stress on the transom for a boat if you have one).

Again I am just addressing the tow yourself option.

The 4 foot draft, isn't a real problem, but the height above water is added to that, then the height of the trailer. My lowly 25 foot low freeboard Capri 25, is 11'2" high on the trailer, with the mast basically ON the deck. So if you have a normal freeboard, cruiser, with near standing room below, you are probably well up to 13'+ which is nearly "overheight." on a trailer. Just saying, you best factor that into your equation. YES YOU can tow oversized, but do you have the experience? Permits are usually PER state, and restrict you as to when you can tow, run between $30 and $100 per state.

I tow #16,000 with my pickup on a regular basis... I pushed my standard class license with the rig, and have to upgrade to get a RV class license now.

My boat though is only #5500 on the trailer, but is 9'2" wide.

I am not sure how you get that heavy a boat, that's only 8' wide, but OK.


and my rig, I've since upgraded the 2500 pickup to a 3500 dually (for the horse trailer)
 

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My Chevrolet Silverado 2500 HD extended cab short box 4x4 6 litre with a 4:10 gear is capable of towing 10400lbs. I have towed about 8000+lbs. with it but I would not do that for a long period of time. It's a handful and the tranny temps are high.
You say your boat is about 6000lbs plus a trailer that will weigh about 2000lbs, you are at 8000lbs minimum.
You haven't mentioned what type of SUV you have but it would have to be a pretty good rig in good shape to do that trip.
Personally I would rent a truck for this trip.
 

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Daniel - Norsea 27
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NOB, Know of any buddies with a bigger truck? To me, it sounds like you might be able to tow with what you have but if you did that, you may have to take it easy and not rush it, just to ease your concerns.

I am not sure how you get that heavy a boat, that's only 8' wide, but OK.
Anything is possible. My boat is listed at 8100 stock for 27' long, 4' draft and 8' beam. That's before the trailer or gear is considered.

I haven't towed my boat much but I have a Silverado 2500HD 4x4 w/diesel that's rated at around 13,000.

 

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Able & willing to learn
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Have you considered having her cruised down to CA? There are Capt. out there that will water transport boats. Mike does it and he has been boat transporting for some time. He is out of OR. his number is one five zero three three one zero seven five nine zero. I was a crew member for him.
 

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Go to a local yacht club and borrow or rent a trailer for the weekend and just tow it home. If you need more towing capacity rent a U-haul truck fir a couple hundred bucks and be done with it.

I used to tow my Olson 30 around all the time without any issues (I have a 9500lbs towing capacity). Other than being a pain in crosswinds it wasn't that bad.

While you are borrowing the trailer ask around for any of the local college age sailing jocks and pay them $100 to come with you for the day and help you get it all rigged well.
 

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Frozen Member
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Go to a local yacht club and borrow or rent a trailer for the weekend and just tow it home. If you need more towing capacity rent a U-haul truck fir a couple hundred bucks and be done with it.

I used to tow my Olson 30 around all the time without any issues (I have a 9500lbs towing capacity). Other than being a pain in crosswinds it wasn't that bad.

While you are borrowing the trailer ask around for any of the local college age sailing jocks and pay them $100 to come with you for the day and help you get it all rigged well.
This! That is what I would do. Rent a heavy duty truck and find a trailer. I have a trailer shop that is right now welding mods to a trailer for way cheap. But, they are a boat/trailer maker so they know how to do it right.
 

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Superior Sailor
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Yes it can be done....

This is how I brought my boat home from Washington DC to Wisconsin 800 miles

Flat bed equipment trailer and well constructed wooden bunk...I have some skills, tools and a plan...( I made the plan part up)...this was temporary and cost very little...



This is the trailer I purpose built to dry slip my boat at the marina...( and take it home in the winter) Welded Steel, bunks and electric brakes...
(Less than a boat buck to build)



6500# boat, 1000# Trailer, 7800# towing capacity on truck (I was probably a little over with the flatbed)
 

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On a boat your size it might be cheaper and easier to sell it in WA and buy a new one in CA. It sucks to invest time into working on a boat then flip it, but you are probably looking at $3000 minimum to move it (including yard time at both ends).
 

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first sailed january 2008
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1,409 Posts
Discussion Starter · #16 · (Edited)
I know, Alex, I know. I can't this time. If I can't go to California, I promised myself I would keep the boat. I put work into the Ranger and was sad to see it go. Now, you know I wanted something a bit bigger, so it worked out well, but still. I need to keep a boat and love it and learn it. I'm sticking with this one. If I don't make it to CA, which I will! but if I don't....still keeping the boat.

It's the yard time I'll have to find out about. What all is involved? Is it mostly stuff I can do? Drop the mast, remove engine, secure mast and boom. Pay for haul out, truck. Or is it more involved than I think.
 

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Different yards will vary in price, but I paid $280 to have the boat lifted into the cradle and have the keel stepped mast pulled and laid on top...Ft Washington, Md...figure close to the same to get it put back together.

I pulled all the rigging prior to them lifting the boat, I removed the OB motor and put in truck along with rudder (now I leave the rudder on)... I secured the mast to boat and boat to trailer...all things you can do yourself...

I own the trailer, straps binders and chain, but you could probably rent ...Cost me gas to get home, I slept in the boat at a wayside on the way back.
 

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I bought the boat on E-Bay for $760.... I probably should have looked at where it was located before I confirmed the bid...

But I got the boat home, fixed up and I love it....wouldn't give it up for anything right now...

Just took it this weekend 120 miles to the Apostle Islands for the summer...third year now...costs $100 to get the mast stepped, I rig and rag and get it ready to launch at the ramp...
 

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It's the yard time I'll have to find out about. What all is involved? Is it mostly stuff I can do? Drop the mast, remove engine, secure mast and boom. Pay for haul out, truck. Or is it more involved than I think.
The major costs are using the Travel Lift to haul the boat out and a crane to drop the mast. If your mast is designed to be lowered using equipment on the boat then you can probably save a couple hundred on either end. You might also be able to get time on a dinghy/dry-sailed boat crane to remove the mast yourself (it depends on the policy for using that crane at marinas you would be near).

I think you'll save a lot of money by doing the other big parts yourself. Preparing standing rigging, removing sails and boom, engine, etc.

You'll probably be paying either the yard or the truck for time as soon as the boat is hauled out until it is on it's way, and the same at the other end.

I do understand wanting to invest in and keep a boat. I just brought it up because I think you haven't sailed this one yet and so you might not have bonded with it yet.
 

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S2 7.9 Bear Lake, UT
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On a boat your size it might be cheaper and easier to sell it in WA and buy a new one in CA. It sucks to invest time into working on a boat then flip it, but you are probably looking at $3000 minimum to move it (including yard time at both ends).
Exactly what I was thinking, even started shopping for you.

Latitude 38 - Classy Classifieds Categories

Lots of good deals in the bay area.
 
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