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I went through 13 gallons motoring on dead seas and dense then fighting 25 knot winds and 5 foot seas when a guy named Arthur passed by on the 4th. If you really don't have a huge sailing area, a three gallon might be fine. But me, I won't leave the dock without both 6 gallon tanks full. Last weekend we sailed 130 miles in four days.
 

· islander bahama 24
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I went through 13 gallons motoring on dead seas and dense then fighting 25 knot winds and 5 foot seas when a guy named Arthur passed by on the 4th. If you really don't have a huge sailing area, a three gallon might be fine. But me, I won't leave the dock without both 6 gallon tanks full. Last weekend we sailed 130 miles in four days.
The op was looking for small tank for dink
I carry up to 21 on my little 24 when doing longer cruises also use gasoline in my cooking stove
 

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I suggest that we focus on OP's original question, and not get rant on about irrelevant long-distance cruising:
I have a small 20 foot sailboat.

The PO sold it to me with a rather large red plastic tank that sits on the floor of the cockpit leaving not a lot of room for feet. Since I only use the motor to get moving in becalmed conditions, or to help get back to the mooring when things get dicey, and since my OB is only 5 HP which gets about 25 kmpg, and since my cruising area doesn't take me more than 10 miles from the mooring, I can't see the need for a tank any bigger than 2 gallons. And knowing that this is the case, the gas may sit in the tank for awhile. I can't see having a tank filled with enough gas for 12 hours of motoring filling up my cockpit.

With the above circumstances, what would others who also have a small sailboat, and who usually just sail, and maybe use the motor to get in and out of the mooring or dock, recommend for the size of the tank sitting on the floor of the cockpit??
For the kind of daysailing that you (and I) do, 2-3 gallons is PLENTY. Don't screw around with any unsafe modifications to other containers. Don't EVER use a plastic container that wasn't designed to hold gasoline, because it could build up static that starts a flash fire.

A 3 gallon tank may be the smallest you can find.

If your motor is a 4 stroke, I'd keep the 3 gallon tank full and siphon it into your car every couple of months so you can use fresh gas. A full tank will degrade less because of less air exposure. Keep the vent closed when not in use. That will also keep the gas fresher.

If you ever head out for a longer distance, you can take a second tank.
 

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Discussion Starter · #26 ·
As the OP, perhaps some further clarification would be worthwhile.

I have a 6.5 gallon tank now. Since the boat sleeps 4(really good friends), has a portapotty, small stove, and sink with water tank, I could go on a 7 day or longer cruise where conceivably the 6.5 gallon tank(worth 13 hours of cruising on motor only) using my 5 HP Honda 4 stroke would be useful.

However for day sailing and the occasional overnighter, the 6.5 gallon tank simply takes up too much cockpit room for the helmsman's feet, and the crew opposite him/her.

I would like to find a 2 gallon tank somewhere.

This would give me 4 hours of cruising which would take me anywhere in the 45 square miles of cruising area that I currently use, and the additional 70 square miles that I might want to use for sailing. I generally don't go beyond about 6 miles from the coast.

I would be happy to make up such a tank myself, and I have found such tanks but unfortunately they are not available for the retail market. Perhaps someone knows of such a two gallon tank somewhere.
 

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· islander bahama 24
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Yeah i saw that one, and then I saw the price tag of $155 + Shipping. Unbelievable! If I could afford that I would ALSO be in a much bigger sailboat.
Back in the day me and my old man made a fuel tank ourselves in fiberglass by laying up flat panels in fiberglass you could do that r check with a local metal cav shop they would be happy to make it for you heck some of the independent shops you may be able to barter the job. Here in the pnw that would be easy to get done make a couple calls and check I out
 
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