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I'd rather be sailing
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Well, we were all ready to pull outta Bimini tomorrow morning and we went to pull the engine off the dink. We lock the outboard using a special masterlock outboard lock - hardened steel, the works - and now we can't find the key to it. Stupidly we never separated the two keys, so the spare is wherever the primary is. As a result, we can't pull the engine off the dink, and we can't tow it with the engine on. There's a short weather window to head to Nassau on Thursday and Friday, and if we don't get to South Cat Cay tomorrow we'll miss it. As far as I can find, there are no locksmiths on Bimini either. I'll be checking with the marina office tomorrow. Anyway, some updates and pics up on our blog, and our plans once we can get out of here...
 

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Will a bolt cutter work? I have no idea how that Master is set up, Im just trying to throw out suggestions, ones you probably already thought of. Hardened might be a challenge.
Can you drill out the (lock) cylinder?
 

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Well, we were all ready to pull outta Bimini tomorrow morning and we went to pull the engine off the dink. We lock the outboard using a special masterlock outboard lock - hardened steel, the works - and now we can't find the key to it. Stupidly we never separated the two keys, so the spare is wherever the primary is. As a result, we can't pull the engine off the dink, and we can't tow it with the engine on. There's a short weather window to head to Nassau on Thursday and Friday, and if we don't get to South Cat Cay tomorrow we'll miss it. As far as I can find, there are no locksmiths on Bimini either. I'll be checking with the marina office tomorrow. Anyway, some updates and pics up on our blog, and our plans once we can get out of here...
Just call a locksmith - $60 bucks and they will pick it...If you have AAA, it may be covered no matter what the expense is
 

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Salty
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Perhaps you can try a large flat-head screwdriver placed between the exposed lock bolt and sliding metal cover. Using a BFH, try to pry the bolt out of the lock. Its not looking like you have many options as those locks are a very good theft deterrent.
 

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I'd rather be sailing
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Ummmm - Jody, that would be the American Automobile Association, not the Bahamas Automobile Association. The total population of all of the islands around Bimini is 1600. We have to take our dinghy to get to the largest town on Bimini - Alice Town - and you can walk up and back the main street in about 10 minutes. As far as I'm aware, the closest locksmiths would be in Miami (50nm across the Gulf Stream) or Nassau (110nm across the Grand Bahama Banks and the Tongue of the Ocean). Hopefully I'll be able to find a nice Bimini-ian with several good drill bits and lubricating oil so I can try to drill out the lock. Even better, maybe someone found the keys and dropped them off at the lost and found :)

The lock is almost completely covered by the bar, which is hardened steel. We're not getting bolt cutters or a hacksaw in. We have a Roto-Zip with a metal cutting wheel that we may try, but I'm concerned about sparks hitting the Hypalon and damaging the dinghy itself.
 

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Telstar 28
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That lock isn't particularly hard to pick... any good locksmith should be able to open in a few minutes.

If you try the rotozip blade, you can always cover the dinghy with some cloth.... to protect the dinghy from the sparks.
 

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I'd rather be sailing
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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Thanks SD... if I could find a locksmith that would be cool. :) :)

We've even checked the vacuum cleaner chamber to see if we accidentally sucked up the key!
 

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You can cut it right off with a Dremel tool and and cutting disk. It will take more than 15 seconds that way, but under 5 minutes.

My experience with those locks is that if you haven't lost the key, the lock rusts on
 

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..........huh?..
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Labatt,

Just throwing out ideas. If you can't find a locksmith in Bimini is there any way you can find a place to stow the darn thing deflated, rolled up with the outboard on and maybe find a locksmith in Nassau? Course I don't know what kind of dinghy you have or how practical that would be. Also your dinghy might be an intregal part of your emergency gear and wouldn't do you much good deflated if you had to use it quick. Like I said, just throwing out ideas to save you a buck or two or maybe some precious time.
 

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I'd rather be sailing
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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
We'll try a few things tomorrow. There's got to be someone with some locksmith experience around here - there are buildings, they have locks, locks sometimes need work. We'll see. With regards to the dinghy itself, it's a 10' RIB that weighs 180lbs dry plus a 110lb 20HP motor on the back that sticks down 8-10" below the waterline. We normally store the engine on our stern rail and the dinghy on the foredeck, upside down and tied down. The weather is supposed to be rough going across the banks to the Tongue of the Ocean and Nassau on Thursday/Friday (5-8ft seas) so I need to make sure everything is VERY secure on deck. I'd be afraid that I'd pummel the deck with the prop and engine if I tried to strap it on the foredeck for that passage. Worse case scenario, the weather is supposed to moderate on Monday or Tuesday, and I MAY be able to do the passage to Nassau dragging the thing behind me.
 

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I'd rather be sailing
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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
A couple of pics of what we're working on... (more info on our blog)



 

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ancient mariner
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if that master lock is one with rivets through the stacked plates that form the lock body you can cut off the end of the rivets & separate the plates. then you can take the lock apart. in the picture it looks like i can see the bottom of the lock with the rivets .
 

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I do know one thing: Three minutes after you have paid a locksmith or had cut off the lock, you will find your keys laying there in plain sight. :laugher
 

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I'd rather be sailing
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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Unfortunately the bar is one solid forged piece with a few holes cut in it to fit the lock through and to fit the engine clamps through. What I would give for it to not be so strong. We're going to try a set of heavy duty snips to see if they will work before resorting to power tools.
 

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Labatt, If all else fails, and you cannot get the lock off, Take a large ball peen hammer. and with a HARD and SWIFT BLOW, strike the opposite end of the locking mechanism to where the lock is. this will break the weak aluminum cast handle. If you are good, or lucky just the end of the handle will break off that the lock is holding onto. I'm sure you can imagine what will happen if you miss! Those handles are easy to replace. Sorry my other suggestion may not work in this circumstance.
 

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Sea Dweeb
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From the photos it appears that you are in luck. The top of the lock bale is fully exposed. If you have a grinder the bale can be ground off at the arch releasing the lock. As SD suggest a liberal application of damp towels to protect the inflatable is in order.
 

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Naw.. It's an extrusion, not forged.

Focus on the bar, not the lock. I think the last time I did this, I used a hacksaw blade. It's not that strong.

David
 
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