SailNet Community banner

1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Mike and the Dirty Bird
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
OK, I just got done with ASA 101.
First thing. I have enough knowledge to do some very basic stuff...but I know already there is A LOT that I dont know.
So where to go from here?

I am in Oklahoma.
There is redbud Marina on Ollagah lake and WindyCrest on Keystone lake for sailing in the area.
I have a little money to spend on the hobby....but not a TON.
I can probably get out and sale 2-4 times a month...more than that would be pushing it until Fall when my work slows down.

I have heard some people say get a little dinghy that they will teach me a lot.
I have heard some people say spend as much time as possible crewing someone elses boat in a race.
I have heard some people say buy a boat and sail as much as possible.

So I thought I would ask here....what do you guys think is the next best step?
As of now, I dont know anyone that has a boat or also sails...so that is out.
 

·
Registered
S2 7.9 Bear Lake, UT
Joined
·
2,334 Posts
I have heard some people say get a little dinghy that they will teach me a lot.
I have heard some people say spend as much time as possible crewing someone elses boat in a race.
I have heard some people say buy a boat and sail as much as possible.

So I thought I would ask here....what do you guys think is the next best step?
As of now, I dont know anyone that has a boat or also sails...so that is out.
All of the above. Spend as much time sailing as you can in any way possible.

In some ways owning a boat impedes the ability to sail, you have maintenance and maybe daily launching that interfere with your sailing time. If there is a sailing club near you join that and go the yacht club and get on a racing boat.

You can't go wrong with owning a dinghy but it comes with boat ownership which is its own hobby. In today's climate some may not be welcoming strangers onboard which is a shame as getting on new boats and meeting new people was part of the fun of sailing.

Consider taking ASA 103 at the end of summer after sailing as much as you can between now and then.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
217 Posts
All of the above. Spend as much time sailing as you can in any way possible.

In some ways owning a boat impedes the ability to sail, you have maintenance and maybe daily launching that interfere with your sailing time. If there is a sailing club near you join that and go the yacht club and get on a racing boat.

You can't go wrong with owning a dinghy but it comes with boat ownership which is its own hobby. In today's climate some may not be welcoming strangers onboard which is a shame as getting on new boats and meeting new people was part of the fun of sailing.

Consider taking ASA 103 at the end of summer after sailing as much as you can between now and then.
mcompton1973 Welcome aboard! jephotog said it pretty well. Have you read this thread? https://www.sailnet.com/forums/introduce-yourself/333758-testing-waters-pennsylvania.html You are ahead of the curve there, but there is still a lot that would apply you.

In short, do whatever you can to get on the water. Read some books ASA 103, Royce's Sailing Illustrated, Annapolis book seamanship. Watch youtube (check out the Maryland school of sailing) Check out https://www.nauticed.org/

Ask questions here.

Find some way to get in a sailboat!
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
4,200 Posts
I think dinghy's are the best way to learn to sail. If you want to learn to cruise, keel boats will do the trick, but if you really want to learn to sail; dinghy, beach cat or tri are good options.
 

·
HANUMAN
Joined
·
2,836 Posts
ASA Coastal Navigation is a very interesting course. You will learn more than most folks who have been on the water flying by the seat of their pants. Not gonna teach you everything but I found it very informative and made my USCG six pack class a little bit easier.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
21,671 Posts
Use it or lose it. Formal training is the way to go, but it will fade, if you don't set it into practice. Pick the vessel that will get you back on the water the soonest and most often.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
526 Posts
You need to sail.

Buy a boat, rent a boat, crew on a boat. Big, little, something in between... doesn't matter, each has advantages and disadvantages. Just sail.

It would be helpful if you had a vision for the type of sailing you want to do. Enjoy a day on the lake? or do you aspire to round the Great Capes. If you're happy dinghy sailing, learning about keelboats while fascinating, is not very relevant. If you plan to cruise, dinghy sailing will give you invaluable experience with sail trim, but a keelboat will teach you the rest of the story.

My vision is cruising. I'm six years into my first boat which I view as a learning laboratory. This summer's lessons: Structural bulkheads and fiberglass, rigging, and why you fix it right the first time. :D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
795 Posts
The ratio of sailing to taking courses should be at least 10 to 1. I took ASA I in 1983 and since then I have taken 5 courses and sailed 70,000 blue-water-miles.

Just go sailing by whatever method possible.

Phil
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,083 Posts
Phil’s advice is spot on. Nothing replaces experience just like any complex skill. Be it flying a plane, riding a motorcycle or driving. Same issues-leagalities, motor skills, situational awareness, maintenance and navigation. Difference is understanding the physics of a foil. That unless you’re DDW you’re gets sucked along not pushed so you need to maintain attached, non turbulent flow along as much of your foil as possible. This is best learned by racing in dedicated racing boats or by 2’itis. With 2’itis you progressively get more spaghetti and controls to play with as boats get bigger in general. The other advantage of gradual moving up in size is you can gradual learn how to maintain an gradually more complex boat with more systems. Last is you’re less likely to drop huge bucks on a vessel that doesn’t move your heart or meet your needs.
I get a lot of crew from landlocked states. Being in OK isn’t an obstacle. Not having a sailing resume loaded with experience is.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
4,200 Posts
There are high performance racing dinghies with more control lines than your average 40 ft cruiser for a tiny fraction of the cost.

This kevlar Fireball is listed in my local classifieds for about $2k. No need to go big to learn the complex sailing rigs.
 

Attachments

1 - 11 of 11 Posts
Top