SailNet Community banner
1 - 7 of 7 Posts

·
Registered
Bristol 29.9
Joined
·
378 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
We had a very small leak at the chainplate so we decided to pull them and rebed with butyl. We can't figure out how we're supposed to get the epoxy in the core. The slot is VERY narrow (we have a Bristol 24). There's no way a Dremel will fit to grind the area out, let alone be able to angle the stick to apply the epoxy.

Should we just try to cram some butyl in that area, then rebed the chainplate with more butyl?

Any advice would be appreciated.

Thanks.
 

·
Master Mariner
Joined
·
9,225 Posts
Once again, I would suggest you use bedding compound, a product specifically made for bedding things on a boat. It is easy to use, clean up and fairly cheap. I've been using it for over 50 years, with great success.
 

Attachments

  • Like
Reactions: christian.hess

·
Registered
Corsair 24
Joined
·
4,594 Posts
btw even after removal and the slot is too thin you can use flat files and rat tail files to enlarge and bevel the edges...

a dremel isnt the only thing you can use for this

I did so mostly with files...bevel at a 45 degree angle or so after enlarging holes since my plates were oversized a bit...

no hard spots AGAINST the plates is paramount...in other words have equal space on all sides...

use whatever you like really...like capta says I wush I had stuff designed for these types of jobs down here but its really basic stuff

to pot just seal up the bottom or simply brush on epoxy a couple of times, let dry and file away...

cheers
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,648 Posts
Which core are you talking about? The deck core? is it bare wood/balsa ends ? is it wet? are you trying to dig out wet core, fill with epoxy to fill and seal then re-bed the chain plates?
 

·
Registered
Bristol 29.9
Joined
·
378 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
We thought from everything we had read that it was standard procedure to dig out some deck core around the chainplate and fill it with epoxy. However, given that there was no sign of goo or softness down below and the tap test on the deck revealed no change in sound, we decided to simply polish the heck out of the chainplates and rebed with the butyl tape. The chainplates looked good. No rusting, only the tiniest of surface imperfections.

We had not seen any moisture last season so we're thinking that the bit of moisture we found last month was due to a pile of snow from this long, cold winter. We seemed to have caught it early. At least that's what we think.

Hopefully we made the right call.
 

·
Senior Moment Member
Joined
·
13,300 Posts
The best thing you can do is to bevel the top of the slots - a rectangular countersink as it were. That way you will create an "O-ring" (rectangle ring?) of sealant - squeeze out can create voids or thin spots in the sealant otherwise.
 
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
Top