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Discussion Starter #1
or when using dual anchors (bahamian or hamerlock):

I have used:
* Chain hooks - I've never had one come off, but I've always wondered; do they ever come off? I use these on a bridle, where the rode is still attached to the boat.
* Slings with prusick hitches (I know some use a rolling hitch) - eventually chafe is a concern. Quick and easy for a bridle.
* Long-D shackles, carefully sized, not through the links but across like a chain hook. I suppose the shackle could stretch under extreme load and slide, but it should stay on. I use this mostly when using a bahamian moor - it allows me to connect the rodes away from the boat and avoid twists.

I have G5 chain and so getting anything through the link that is strong enough is not possible. Many quickly say" shackle the chains together - nope - not enough room between the links on this chain. On other chains, yes there is, and that would be a simple solution.

With the latter 2 methods I install the sling or shackle between the windlass and the roller and then let the chain out to make the final attachment on the other side, rather than lean over the bow to fool with it. The chain hook is easy enough to attach while leaning.

Has anyone tried either the Wichard locking chain hook or the Kong Chain Gripper? Will either fit over the roller, so that I do not have to fool with them leaning over the bow?

Because I have a catamaran and use a bridle every time, this is a nightly concern. Though I have never had a failure of any sort, there is always room for improvement.
 

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Super Fuzzy Moderator
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We use a hook..I think its Wichard but definitely not locking.

I've heard say that they bend or even break but even in a stinking southerly gale when we dragged half a boats length and were in waves you could have surfed (at a pinch) the thing did not give.

I find it comes up over the anchor roller with nary a complaint and I've yet to have it come off by itself even when there is no strain on the snubbing line.

To deploy I usually just let out the chain to required scope then hook on and let out a few more metres.
 

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I'm the same as TW, use a anchor hook for the last two years no problems. I also use a double bridle to keep the boat centred and avoiding chaf on the bobstay.

Just sat through a 20-30kt strong wind last night & had no problemo (plenty of other things went wrong over the weekend :( ah well.

ilenart
 

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Telstar 28
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Putting anything into a link is a bad idea, as the links are likely to deform and fail. I'd recommend a chain hook. :) The best one I've used is basically a flat rectangular plate of stainless steel with two holes and a slot. The slot goes around the chain, a shackle can attach to each hole, so you can either use it as a snubber or as a bridle.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I like tha idea - custom fabrication, or do you have a source?

Putting anything into a link is a bad idea, as the links are likely to deform and fail. I'd recommend a chain hook. :) The best one I've used is basically a flat rectangular plate of stainless steel with two holes and a slot. The slot goes around the chain, a shackle can attach to each hole, so you can either use it as a snubber or as a bridle.
Is it rated for use in a wide angle (45- to 90-degree) bridle? The resulting pull will be apart, which may change things a bit, though not greatly, depending on the design.

Is there a provision to prevent the surely remote possibility of the chain jumping out? Depending on the position of the holes, a simple latch plate would be simple (a small plate with matching holes that crossed the slot).

Second Sailingdog's comment on "nothing through the link"; that has been the conventional wisdom and I have seen the after effect when loaded hard in a rigging application. A screwed up link.
 

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Telstar 28
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A friend of mine made me mine, but I've seen them commercially available.
 

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Super Fuzzy Moderator
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Telstar 28
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Basically looks a lot like this:


from Steve Dashew's Setsail.com site. :)
 

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We use a basic old chain hook. From there a line comes off with an actual snubber (a rubber snubber). From there, we have two lines to tie on to two seperate cleats forward to spread the load. Hope that makes sense?? Works VERY well.

The chain hook will come off. I have heard say that it will wear the chain too if you keep using the same link, so spread it around. We actually use a cheap little bungie cord to hold on the chain hook. It takes no strain... just keeps the hook from falling off.

You can make your own. It is really simple.

Brian
 

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Discussion Starter #11
So simple - I found this photo on another forum, but can't seem to find the maker...

The entry said ABI, but I don't see it on the net. I believe the product line went to "Taylor Made", but I understand it is discontinued.

Personally, I would make the slot 2-3 times longer (so that it would hold, like a hook, with only one leg shackled) and I would add a latch plate (connecting the shackles) so that the chain could not jump. The latch would also greatly increase strength, just as a carabiner is ~4x stronger when the gate is closed than when it is open. It appears stout, so that is not at issue.

Looks simple though - a drill press, port-a-band, grinder, and a bit of scrap.

I see an answer I like; with a deeper slot it could be used as a chain hook, with two shackles as shown, or even latched. I can even see, as illustrated, that one could easily hook the chain rode simply by pulling it up from underneath and then slacking the rode.
 

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Telstar 28
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The one I have is 7/16" thick or so... and quite stout... works with one or two lines attached.
 

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Super Fuzzy Moderator
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We use a basic old chain hook. From there a line comes off with an actual snubber (a rubber snubber). From there, we have two lines to tie on to two seperate cleats forward to spread the load. Hope that makes sense?? Works VERY well.

The chain hook will come off. I have heard say that it will wear the chain too if you keep using the same link, so spread it around. We actually use a cheap little bungie cord to hold on the chain hook. It takes no strain... just keeps the hook from falling off.

You can make your own. It is really simple.

Brian
Brian,
I've never had the hook come off under load. Our old hook (which was just a heavy duty S hook) would always fall off when slackened, the new one is quite snug. Interesting point re wear on the link....I guess only really a problem when staying at anchor for days on end.

Altair,
Sounds like a plan. Increasing the slot length makes sense. Not so sure that the latch plate would be necessary. Nice idea but is it over engineering the thing ? I guess I am a little relaxed about jumping the hook cos I've never had it happen and don't see it as a major problem. Indeed in really nasty conditions I will remove the snubber in the off chance that something else goes awry. One less thing to worry about and all that. Means a bit of crash and bang but not for long cos if I'm exposed and the blow is more than a squall then I'm going to run away to somewhere calmer.
 

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Discussion Starter #14 (Edited)
One thing to consider is that multihulls always use a bridle.

However, honestly, waves are often less of a concern, because shallow draft will often allow us to better escape open water.

In fact, the chain is still connected to the boat, providing back-up. I can only see myself worrying over the latch if I were leaving the boat for an extended period or expecting some real S___. The latch is only a plate with 2 holes and adds no complexity when unused.

Is this complete overkill? Yeah, I know it is. But in reading anchoring threads I see a lot of that going on and don't feel too bad about it. I sleep best when I have no cares in the world, and I won't stand anchor watch - I'll remove the weak link.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
A long rectangular plate (4"x3/4"x1/8") with 2 holes that match the shackle holes.

It would block the slot, so the chain could not jump out. Not very convenient, but positive. A lashing would do. A
 

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Courtney the Dancer
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I just bought one of the these plates at Fisheries Supply and spliced two 5/8" lines to it with thimbles and shackles. I'm thinking I will run both lines from one side of the bow so the chain will be held captive between the lines. Haven't had the chance to use it yet.
 

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Super Fuzzy Moderator
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It would block the slot, so the chain could not jump out. Not very convenient, but positive. A lashing would do. A

though....hole at one end going through located by the shackle pin. U slot at the other. Flip it over the the second pin. Yes, it could come off the pin but hey how pessimistic are we gonna get here ? ;)

also....given that I already have a hook....I could simply put two shackles onto the line end of the hook and run a bridle from them. I think the hole in the hook would be large enough to handle adequate sized shackles.
 

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If by chain hooks you guys mean one of these, I have been using these for years to stop chain growl. Coincidentally bought this one the other day and still have to splice a line on.



I never use it to hold a rode that has not got the bitter end securely fastened to the boat but I have yet to have one of these jump off a chain and when on, it does no damage.

Oh, and I have no need for a bridle.
 
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