SailNet Community banner

1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
12 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hi Folks,

I have an American 14.6 dinghy, and I'd like to add two pairs of small tie-downs on the vertical surface of the cockpit benches so that I can keep some paddles there. (They'd be behind your calves if you were sitting on the bench seat.) I found a set of four stainless tie-downs on amazon for $12, and I'm sure I can find some screws if I look.

My question is, is this a bright idea? Will I run into trouble blind surface screwing into the fiberglass? The space under the bench is inaccessible, so I can't drill and bold the tie-downs on. I've done enough research (10 minutes?) to know that I should start the pilot hole with a countersink bit, and that using the right diameter bit is very important, since fiberglass isn't very forgiving. I figure some kind of sealant is necessary, but I haven't gotten that far yet.

Any ideas?

Thanks,

Stephen
 

·
██▓▓▒▒░&
Joined
·
13,645 Posts
I'd lightly abrade the fiberglass and use a thickened epoxy or 5200 to attach the tie-downs. Then add the screws after it has cured. They won't be going anyplace after that. (Remember to solvent clean the tie-downs, too.)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,778 Posts
Hi Folks,

I have an American 14.6 dinghy, and I'd like to add two pairs of small tie-downs on the vertical surface of the cockpit benches so that I can keep some paddles there. (They'd be behind your calves if you were sitting on the bench seat.) I found a set of four stainless tie-downs on amazon for $12, and I'm sure I can find some screws if I look.

My question is, is this a bright idea? Will I run into trouble blind surface screwing into the fiberglass? The space under the bench is inaccessible, so I can't drill and bold the tie-downs on. I've done enough research (10 minutes?) to know that I should start the pilot hole with a countersink bit, and that using the right diameter bit is very important, since fiberglass isn't very forgiving. I figure some kind of sealant is necessary, but I haven't gotten that far yet.

Any ideas?

Thanks,

Stephen
Photos or a link really help the quality of responses.

Epoxies and polyurethanes do not really bond stainless very well, the bond area is probably minimal, and leverage bad if someone kicks them. Every boat I've owned has had stainless pad eyes glued in place that fell off.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,826 Posts
You will want to check if the seats are the capsize floatation on that boat before you cut into it or drill holes. also consider that anything stored on the lower section of the seat will be where your feet will be and could be hazardous if you slip and can cause cuts to the legs or feet.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
You will want to check if the seats are the capsize floatation on that boat before you cut into it or drill holes. also consider that anything stored on the lower section of the seat will be where your feet will be and could be hazardous if you slip and can cause cuts to the legs or feet.
The seats most definitely provide capsize flotation. This might be a stupid question, but does that mean that I should not drill holes at all, or just that I have to be extra certain that my result is water tight? Are deck plates (properly installed) waterproof, or merely splash proof?

The paddles are currently being kept on the deck at our feet, so they're already a major trip hazard :)
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
4,196 Posts
Are deck plates (properly installed) waterproof, or merely splash proof?
I wouldn't say they are 100% water proof, but they are pretty darn good. I have them on buoyancy chambers on both of my boats, and I am currently building a new race boat (GIS) and I definitely plan on installing them on all buoyancy tanks on it.

My raid boat is a pretty good demonstration. They are super exposed and one or the other of them is frequently awash on one tack or the other. I have purchased a complete set of camping gear specifically selected to fit through these inspection ports. Tent, sleeping bags, stove, food. I can carry enough gear for 2 guys for a week in the holds and I haven't sunk yet. After a day of hard sailing, I doubt I accumulate an inch of water through them. I do put water sensitive gear inside water proof bags, and then attach it to a steel cable attached to the inside of the port with carribeaners so it doesn't get lost in the hull.

Here are a couple of pics that demonstrate how exposed they are to the weather on my raid boat.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,129 Posts
Or you could just get a collapsible paddle that will stow inside the forward storage area and eliminate clutter in the cockpit. Adhesive eyes for lashing the paddles could be used also. American Sail can also sell you additional inspection ports that match the one used on the centerboard trunk and would be able to advise you expertly on where you may or may not drill or cut into the boat. If you do not have one they may even mail you an owners packet with all the documentation on the boat.

https://americansail.com/products/parts-a-accessories/american-146-parts
https://americansail.com/contact



https://www.amazon.com/Shoreline-Marine-Propel-Telescoping-Paddle/dp/B017P3ARYI/ref=sr_1_2_sspa?ie=UTF8&qid=1529208792&sr=8-2-spons&keywords=boat+paddle&psc=1
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,648 Posts
One option might be to mount the tie-downs to piece of plastic sheet and then epoxy the plastic to the fiberglass. That would greatly increase the contact area of the gluing surface.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,073 Posts
Your best, easiest,cheapest and least destructive method would be to use VHB mounted SNADs from Sailrite. Make a couple of webbing straps with snaps in them, snap them around the paddles then onto the SNADs. Clean the mounting surface in the dinghy with alcohol (JD is fine) then press the Snads into place. The paddle is now firmly mounted. The next day, you could probably LIFT the dingy with them, no . . really.



If they ever NEED to be remove, you can rip, pry, tear, cut them off then rub the remaining VHB off with something rubber. The boat will be undamaged.
 

Attachments

1 - 10 of 10 Posts
Top