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Oh, I was thinking of the bigger boat since I have a 34 ft motor home and I though I could sail out somewhere, anchor down and relax like I do in the motor home.

Another question was. In my RV, I pull my pickup, I'll stop someplace for a week and jump in my truck and go play some golf. Well that doesn't look like that will work from a sailboat at anchor.
I know someone who lives on a 30 foot boat. I think anything from a 32-36 footer would be a fine weekend cruiser for one person or even smaller. I know a couple that cruise long chunks of the summer on a Dana 24. I think anything with a reliable diesel, and standing headroom is all you need for cruising a few days at a time. A boat in the mid 30s would give you enough space to carry what you need to cruise longer and maybe have a guest to help you sail. The smaller the boat the easier it will be to both afford and sail.

I would sign up for ASA 101 and 103. In the 103 class you will be introduced to boats in the 30 foot range and it will help you determine if you can develop the skills to single hand a boat that size. Instead of a pickup in a sailboat you carry and sometimes tow a dinghy, a small inflatable 8-10 foot boat with outboard that acts as a pickup. It can get you to and from shore where you can eat or hike or buy supplies.
 

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Oh, I was thinking of the bigger boat since I have a 34 ft motor home and I though I could sail out somewhere, anchor down and relax like I do in the motor home.

Another question was. In my RV, I pull my pickup, I'll stop someplace for a week and jump in my truck and go play some golf. Well that doesn't look like that will work from a sailboat at anchor.
Actually Sailors do the sailing equivalent of you RV experience. Many tow a rigid inflatable dinghy behind their boat, or hang it from davits from the stern. They stop somewhere to anchor, or at a Municipally maintained mooring ball, and motor ashore in their dinghy to go dining or sightseeing.

You could probably find places where you can go ashore in your dinghy, call an Uber, and go golfing.
 

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Discussion Starter #23
Now there's a thought, UBER. I was thinking of a bike but carrying my clubs would be a pain, but UBER, hmmm. This may work yet.
I guess the reason I was looking for a larger boat is I don't feel right unless I can take a shower everyday. So I thought I'd need to find something over 30 feet. Maybe not?
 

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i"m 74 and regularly single-hand my Cal 33. Age is one thing, but good health, strength and balance also are key issues. With a furling jib and autopilot, sailing is really not the issue. It's getting back on the mooring in a blow, anchoring, docking, etc. that can be the most issues for a single person.
 

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I would say for the most part decent showers start at about 35 feet. It's a reasonable thing to want, if that's what you want.

Golfing. My last marina was at a nice public golf course. Both were run by the municipality. So one could go down to their boat, golf in the morning and a sail in the afternoon. Might be able to find a set up like that.
 

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I guess the reason I was looking for a larger boat is I don't feel right unless I can take a shower everyday.
Once you become a sailor you'll get over that. :D

You can actually have a shower in a tiny boat. When I was out on a friends 30 footer with a total of 4 of us onboard I would use a solar shower and take a shower on the bow in my bathing suit each day.

I shower both to be clean and to luxuriate in the hot water. Showering in a boat is not the same as at your home or even your RV. In a 35 foot boat you have a decent sized (head) bathroom, by decent sized head I mean you can almost stand up and turn around in it. Your head is likely the shower also. You will pull the sink attachment out and hang it on the wall. The boat will need to be plugged in or the motor running and so equipped to provide heat from shore power or the engine. The water pressure will leave something to be desired. When done your entire bathroom will be wet and so will your toilet paper if you did not hide it beforehand. Your boat will also have gotten a dose of moisture from the shower.

Almost all marinas have showers for visiting boaters. I use those facilities whenever I can, the shower is better, getting dressed afterwards is easier and the boat stays drier.
 

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Now there's a thought, UBER. I was thinking of a bike but carrying my clubs would be a pain, but UBER, hmmm. This may work yet.
I guess the reason I was looking for a larger boat is I don't feel right unless I can take a shower everyday. So I thought I'd need to find something over 30 feet. Maybe not?
I just bought a Bristol 35.5. It is just big enough to take a possible shower in. Mine has a small track mounted on the cabin ceiling with little gliders in hooks, where a shower curtain was mounted. I have not yet put one up, but it can create a tiny little stall that protects the cabinet tree, toilet paper, and wooden doors from the water splatter. It directs all the water down to the great in the floor, which has its own bilge pump.

Some marinas have some kind of shuttle van service, some have a number for an Enterprise rental place that will bring you a car. A town of any decent size, should have Uber or Lyft.
 

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I see this has gone to a live-a-board so here is my two cents. Take every position you want or think you need and move into your bedroom and live there for 6 months because that is a lot more flat inside space and storage than you will have on a 32 foot boat. When my wife and I downsized to a smaller house. We did something similar for 6 months, emptied rooms, moved furniture in to small room size to see if we were ok and we are. 14 years now in a 950 sq ft house after living for 20 years in a 2400 ft. It still all about compromises. Dennis
 

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Discussion Starter #29
Crazy ideas, but. I looked up a golf course I've played on the Willamette river. And--- I could anchor on the river, throw my clubs in a dinghy, row to the edge, hide the dinghy and walk 1/4 mile to the course. ha ha
 

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Crazy ideas, but. I looked up a golf course I've played on the Willamette river. And--- I could anchor on the river, throw my clubs in a dinghy, row to the edge, hide the dinghy and walk 1/4 mile to the course. ha ha
Is there a nearby Marina? Ask the golf course if they provide shuttle service from the marina. Ask the marina if they have any kind of transportation service. I know that in Oriental North Carolina, the local Piggly Wiggly has a shuttle van. Because it's a large Sailing Community, the manager got permission to purchase a van. If you call them, they will drive to the marina, pick you up, take you to the grocery store, let you shop, and then deliver you back to your boat and help you unload your groceries.

I heard of one Marina that has an old station wagon they will loan to anybody who rents one of their slips, for a month or a night.
 

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Crazy ideas, but. I looked up a golf course I've played on the Willamette river. And--- I could anchor on the river, throw my clubs in a dinghy, row to the edge, hide the dinghy and walk 1/4 mile to the course. ha ha
If your goal is to golf as much as possible, RVing is likely a better option for you. The amount of effort it takes to travel by boat is not to be underestimated. Traveling 50 miles to the next marina is an all day event. Staying at a marina each night adds to the expense of sailing greatly. If you are not at a marina, getting to shore requires a ride in your dinghy which sometimes takes some effort just getting into the boat, now add golf clubs into the mix and then motor to where an Uber can get you to a course.

As a rule most people try to minimize the trips away from the boat or from the water, at least I do. Generally I only travel as far as i can walk from the shore when sailing. I will leave the boat only to go for a hike, groceries or a cooked meal. Once on a 2 week sailing trip i rented a scooter and once I had a sailnetter pick me up and take me to a grocery store.

Not saying it can't be done but adding a sailboat as a way to get to and from golf courses really complicates things. A sailboat is very expensive way to get somewhere for free.

I have gotten on a mailing list that has an RV plan that includes farms, wineries and now golf courses. You can literally park at the course and walk out of your RV onto the green in the morning. Driving to and from a course and parking in the lot would make the whole process that much easier.
 

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Discussion Starter #32
Youall's experiences is much better and quicker than me sticking my foot in there.

So another idea today. I lived in San Diego many years ago and on the west coast it's a much better place to have a sailboat than Portland. So I thought what if I found a boat for sale that I liked and it included a slip?? Slip fees, which I heard were very expensive may not be. In Portland they are around $170-200. With a quick look from my phone, San Diego is comparable or maybe a little less??

I could sell my RV, buy a sailboat/slip in San Diego and winter down there instead of Arizona?? If I drove down from Oregon I would have a car and a boat and a place to live. Almost the same.
 

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Slip fees, which I heard were very expensive may not be. In Portland they are around $170-200. With a quick look from my phone, San Diego is comparable or maybe a little less??

I could sell my RV, buy a sailboat/slip in San Diego and winter down there instead of Arizona?? If I drove down from Oregon I would have a car and a boat and a place to live. Almost the same.
This is a much better potential plan. The only problem is slip fees are not cheap, especially in San Diego. I had a 32 foot there and figured long term costs averaged about $12,000 a year, it is likely closer to $20k nowadays to own a sailboat in San Diego. Slip fees are expensive because the weather is as close to perfect as it gets and owning a boat is approachable where as owning a home there is not. I knew people who came from Ohio, Arizona and all over to spend a better season than home in San Diego, escape winters in Ohio and summers in Arizona.

One issue is there are a limited amount of liveaboard slips, make sure your boat has a liveaboard with a grandfather clause, otherwise, you have the potential of being kicked off your boat. I know plenty of people living "illegally" on their boat but it really depends on the marina you choose.
 

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This is a much better potential plan. The only problem is slip fees are not cheap, especially in San Diego. I had a 32 foot there and figured long term costs averaged about $12,000 a year, it is likely closer to $20k nowadays to own a sailboat in San Diego. Slip fees are expensive because the weather is as close to perfect as it gets and owning a boat is approachable where as owning a home there is not. I knew people who came from Ohio, Arizona and all over to spend a better season than home in San Diego, escape winters in Ohio and summers in Arizona.

One issue is there are a limited amount of liveaboard slips, make sure your boat has a liveaboard with a grandfather clause, otherwise, you have the potential of being kicked off your boat. I know plenty of people living "illegally" on their boat but it really depends on the marina you choose.
you need a more up to date phone. San Diego slip prices of $200 was back in 1972. If you can find a live aboard slip it will be about 18 to 20k a year. five years ago my 35' non live aboard slip in San Diege was 12k a year. most will not allow live aboard on less the 35' boat. my son lived as a sneak aboard on a friends boat, it took about a month before they found him out and then he could only live aboard 3 days a week. the car parking is very limited and most of it is now pay parking, no more free parking at the beach in San diego. I have heard of some marinas that have car parking for the live aboard but it is an extra $200 a month
 

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Discussion Starter #35
Your right 'overboard'. What I was looking at was moorage not slip fees. Slip fees are $700 +- plus electricity, if you could find a slip available. I have a friend down there that lives aboard a 42' sloop and he's tied up to some moorage. I sold him my 11' Joel White Shellback.

Well another idea shot down. I may just join the sailing club in Portland. They have quite a few boats from 20-29'.
 

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Your right 'overboard'. What I was looking at was moorage not slip fees. Slip fees are $700 +- plus electricity, if you could find a slip available. I have a friend down there that lives aboard a 42' sloop and he's tied up to some moorage. I sold him my 11' Joel White Shellback.

Well another idea shot down. I may just join the sailing club in Portland. They have quite a few boats from 20-29'.
A sailing club would be a good way to get into sailing. In the meantime you could look for boats in the Socal area that is already a liveaboard. If the person has a liveaboard situation sometimes the liveaboard status comes with the boat if you buy it. You would likely pay a premium for a boat with liveaboard status. Besides San Diego you can consider Oceanside, Dana Point or Long Beach. While I prefer San Diego to Orange or LA County, the northern marinas puts you in a better position to getting to Catalina in a day or less.
 

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Discussion Starter #37
Yeah the advantage of San Diego is you have the whole bay to sail in or go out in the ocean once in a while, Up the coast is different.

I'm now considering a 30-40ft boat in the Portland area. I could go up, I live about and hour + drive south, spend time on the boat, 3-6 days on the boat, probably up and down the river or in the marina with a couple golf courses not to far away. I checked and slip fees are more reasonable, $180-230 with electricity. Not the same as Cruising in the San Diego bay but then I wouldn't have to drive all the way down the state of Calif to get to the boat.
 

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I guess the reason I was looking for a larger boat is I don't feel right unless I can take a shower everyday. So I thought I'd need to find something over 30 feet. Maybe not?
My wife's one request for our sailboat was a shower, and we still laugh about this. We have used it exactly once in seven years. As someone else said, you get over it.

I see plenty of young couples anchoring out in boats smaller than ours, with an inflatable dinghy to get to shore. I can't imagine needing more than my 28' if I was by myself unless I was living on the boat full time and needed a place to keep all my things. For up to a week, 30 ft should be plenty.
 
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