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if you mean forward where the cap shrouds and stays meet for the mizzen mast the right answer would be no because you are decreasing the angle off the stays and you dont know what angle is enough for your boat unless you talked to the designer...while it might work for a while undue stress will be put on other areas of the rig..

the second issues is you would have to make new chainplates or bases or cheeks or rework the interior since most likey they are reinforced from the inside...

how are they installed currently?

do they attach to a bulkhead or backing plate, or tang? or what?

3rd you will have issues although this is the least of your worries with the leech of the mainsail hitting both backstays every jibe or broad reach etc...unneeded wear and tear on the sail..

there are ways to help with that but you are just adding another unneeded problem

quick answer no

long answer maybe but you would have to mod significantly depending on the rest of the rig.

cheers
 

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High Styx flyer. While I have made some rigging changes such as adding a bow pulpit and extending the fore-stay with great performance results I have a 35 Coronado sloop rig and am unfamiliar with the running back-stay mounts on the ketch rig but am assuming you wish to move them forward some. The angle of course can be no less then the angle on MMast to the end of the boom and strong new chain-plate hull support will have to be fiberglassed in. This requires some innovation due to the way the deck is attached to the hull If you have a king/gueen stay from main to misen you may also consider attaching the running MM rigging to the sheet line slide( mine extend all the way aft) so it can be adjusted for certain points of sail and getting it out of the way of the misen boom when the misen is in use.. As long as it is secure and the angle not to extreme it should be OK for normal running sails. If it looks wrong it is. it is prudent to ask a professional rigger or 3. The original design is not the only safe design on a mass production boat. Often just the cheapest.

I have 2 fuel tanks (stock original)in the starboard v berth and center strbd bulk head. They are mostly inaccessible from the bottom and do not appear to have a drain plug.
The best tank drain method I have found is to pump it out with a permanently installed electric fuel priming pump( from $17 to $50 US). Since I have a Perkins diesel this also makes it easy to purge the system of air/ water and is one of my first installations on a new boat. You can intall a T- valve or just disconnect it from the fuel filter for draining. No diesel should be without one.
Hope this helped some.

As you become more familiar with your boat please help correct the rumors that all Coronado 35's have a balsa hull core. My 1971 does not and I have never met an owner who says his is. This falsehood is propagated by one supposed expert who has never owned one and has cheapened the reputation,value and demand of a great little/big liv-a-board cruiser in the US (Not in Europe where they are actually highly sought after). After 18 years of ownership and many through hulls installed I can positively state that my 1971 hull is solid glass that has had only 1 small osmosis bubble when I first got her never to return after repair
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Happy sailing, Capt. Rick
 

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my quick search shows they are really popular in spain! with lots for sale and charter there

good luck
be safe and dont mod before doing your homework...
 

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I just bought a Coronado CC 35. The mainsail backstay is driving me crazy. Is it possible to
move it closer to the mizzen stays w/o harming structural integrity?
If the roach of the mainsail is constantly 'fouling' and getting caught on a backstay and which prevents the full swing of the mainsail .... check to be sure that your mainsail isnt raised too far. Sometimes lowering the mainsail by just an inch or two on the mast is all that it takes to allow the mainsail to 'swinging over' under the backstay without 'catching'.
If the mainsail is full battened, loosening batten compression will sometimes help.
Its OK for some of the roach to 'rub' across the backstay when swinging over, just as long as the sail isnt 'stopped cold' when it crosses the backstay.

There is a mechanical solution - adding a backstay crane to the top of the mast which moves the backstay aft and changes its vertical angle ... but this has to be structurally correct (expensive).
 

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ja, I too wanted to know what was driving him crazy...and confused by where he wants to move the backstays?

it seemed forward because the mizzen stays are forward of the main backstays as is commonly done...

per the pics I have found out there.

but this would make things worse...
 
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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I apologize. I should have been more clear.

The backstay splits into a Y at about 15' and intersect the mizzen stays near the cockpit wall at about 5'. They then angle down at attach to the deck about 2" from the edge of the boat. To get past them if you're more than 3' tall you have to swing around putting yourself over the edge of the boat. 2 people have already drawn blood on them.

Both stays attach to the deck with a steel plate on the ceiling inside of the aft cabin. The plates are about 2 ft. apart.

I would like to move the main b/s closer to the cockpit wall giving more clearance to walk past them.

There appears to be more than enough sail clearance to do this.

My concern is somehow weakening the main mast support.

Does this help?

Thanks to all.
 

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ok so I understood correctly

my main issue with this is that you have to know what the designer specified as least angle for the backstays...meaning of course you can move them forward provided the main sail isnt completely hindered but you really have to know the loads being exerted on the REST of the rig by doing so

most importantly you have to reinforce the area by way of cheeks or bulkheads and or plates that tie into a strong point on the hull etc...they would also have to be stronger than the current attachment points since the angle is decreeased towards the top of the mast...

for example much more force will be exerted on your main lowers and cap shrouds and or intermediates if you have them

its not impossible to do...but you have to make sure you still have strength, to be safe.

also a pic would be awesome as Im still confused as to the intersection you speak of...do you mean they physically touch or simply cross paths(angles)?

cheers
 

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OK / what I got was that they planted them right in the walkway by theasy hatch behind the cowling. simular to the main mast stays prblem is getting by them because th 15ft spit stay angle in tomuch requiring a duck and slide-by.
1)Easiest An improvement would be to move to change the split stay to t separate stays as most boats come standard with. You can get a 1to 2 fitting and use the same mast tang to give a higher angle. Just run your mail sheet haul line back to the chainplate first to see if that will make do
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2) least expensive. This will depend on the MM boom lenth The sloop is 11ft I think the ketch is smaller. "If" you can angle to the back of the cockpi cowling and not interfear with the mm boom swing a relitively easy and cheapest fix. The cowling is really the strongest part of this boat .. jus glass
reinforce the inside cowling to deck all the way around to the aft winch seat and than glass in a chainplate backing all the way across the inside aft of the cowling backwall and the deckglass. The further out you put the new chainplate (a approx 2x 26x 5/16 stainless or bronze strip) the more boom clearance you'll have. I think the boom is tong for this.

3) hardest if I has to be further back you can move them to the outside hull, Your aft cabin windows may present a problem if it goes to far back for the angle. You would have to cut the the rub rail guide and slide a 2x 20x 5/16 stainless or bronze strip behind it Reinforce the hull-sides. As I said earlier the deck to hull attachmen while be a small obstacle. It is top(hull) and bottomed (deck with aluminum reinforcement that is riveted together with the Aluminum rub rail guide/ connector a pain but not impossible.
4) of course you can always just move the present chainplate outboard through the deck and run separate stays as in 1) but if you misen also uses these chain plates you will need longer stays and new spreaders for it as well as risking leakage into the plywood core.
I would check to see if 1) works for satisfactory clearance with the main sail haul and go from therr or the obvious just attached it as low down on the misen as you can but as it is stepped to the deck ( as is the main) mishap could yank it free and bring the whole rig down when you need it most. a king top to top of masts or queen top main to 2/3 or so m would have less up pull. I knew some that kept the running back stays diconnected unless heavy seas were coming Check out a rigging book for ideas. Many small rigs do not have running back stays

That's all I got. Good luck
Capt Rick
 

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I understand now...so there is a Y that is only spread out apart 2 feet or so and they are near the rear of the cockpit coamings? you want them more outboard and to each side right?

if so then you actually gain strength especially on reaches by using dual backstays...just dont decrease the angle too much in relation to the masthead.

of course you still need to beef up the area, use backing plates or cheeks etc...but I get why its a nuissance now

basically you had a y backstay but still single so the lowers were always in the way

gotcha(I think) jajaja
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Sorry, I'm still to describing this right.

The main backstays divide and attached to the deck about 2" from the edge of the boat close to the stern. They bolt to flat plates in the interior aft cabin roof. Their path passes thru two mizzen stays blocking passage along the deck to the stern. You have to swing outside of the mains over the edge of the boat to get to the stern. Hard to do while carrying a drink. Their angles intersect at a height of about 4' blocking passage down the deck. The mizzen stays attach in the same manner near the edge of the cockpit about 2' away and about 12-14 inches forward..

I would like to move the mains inboard close to the mizzen stays and away from the edge of the boat. This clears a walkway to the stern. There is room for a straight lateral move inward if necessary.

As I said before there does not appear to be a problem with the main sail in terms of clearance.
 
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