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It seems like a good idea to leave the boat in the Bahamas but a glance at the land elevations make it obvious that the 15-20' storm surge of a major hurricane would inundate almost everything in its path. The same can be said about much of Southern Florida as well.
When is the last time the Bahamas got a 15 to 20 storm surge? I went through Katrina, and I laughed when they told me in the Bahamas they had some bad hurricanes, standing next to buildings that were obviously 40 to 50 years old and only five feet or so above seal level.

I've seen what a 15 to 20 storm surge does, and it doesn't leave anything like that still standing in its path.

I think the geography of the Bahamas prevents them from getting bad surges. But, I imagine a rage sea at the cuts during a hurricane would have to be seen to be believed though. :D
 
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I've looked at the land elevations in the Bahamas trying to find places that look like they might be more safe during a storm but it all depends on the wind direction which may be impossible to predict. The mangrove idea is good unless the area becomes exposed from a surge, allowing the ocean waves to get in. I think the best decision is to head back to the mainland DAYS ahead of a potential hurricane.

Those SLOSH graphics surprised me too.
We have to keep in mind that SLOSH is brand new and there are going to be a lot of tweaks to the formulas. I live in Hurricane Alley (northern gulf coast), and it is amazing how different the surges can be when hurricanes of the same intensity hit different areas of the coast with different underwater geography.

Pass Christian and Bay St. Louis, MS always get the worst storm surges, because of the compression effect when water is pushed into the corner of the gulf that they occupy (when it can't go left or right, it goes up). In Katrina, it got storm surges of 35 to 45 feet (my wifes house in Bay St. Louis, was surveyed to be 45 feet above sea level, and during Katrina she got three feet of water in her house, my house, just six miles farther east, only got 23 feet), while just a few miles down the coast in Gulfport and Biloxi, the surges were only in the 20's and high teens.

SLOSH type predictions have been needed for a long time, but it's going to take a while before they have any kind of accuracy I would imagine.

The Bahamas never get really bad storm surges for the same reason Miami never does. When Andrew hit us, a few days after it hit Miami, and with much slower wind speeds, we still got twice as much storm surge as Miami had received.

But, still, if I was going to leave a boat in the Bahamas for hurricane season, I would want it in a yard and strapped down, not in the water anywhere.
 
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