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One of None
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Discussion Starter #1
Did a re-sawing trick today that I saw on one of the PBS woodworking shows It worked very well.

2.5 thick white oak junk wood, cut it just 6" wide, about 3' long. squared one edge...Needed help lifting this one! :(

Set table saw rip fence to 1.25 and ripped each edge of the board about 2" deep. (it's wet wood too)

Then took it to band-saw, without the re-saw guide, and the board on the squared edge. sliced it (very slow, it's only a 14" delta BS) right down the middle. result = 2 nicely book matched boards for free. :D
 

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Cool, I like woodwork, gettting ready to build a wood steamer and jig for a project coming up

Gonna use a 36"x6" (maybe 4") dia sch. 40 PVC and a wagner wallpaper steam machine, that should maintain 200 degs long enough ( or longer ) to bend some 1x solid stock
 

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"Paint" the ends with wood glue so they don't split as it dries.

2 cents worth of free advice from a shop teacher. :)
 

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Thanks for sharing this with us. The follow up responses were also good.
I'm a retired contractor in NH...Love info like this. I just got throuth working on a barn built in 1835 up heah.
I had the good fortune to be able to take some original timber for myself, mostly 4x4 and 2x12 stock.
 

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Pappy and I replied at the same time -- the wood-glue-on-the-ends thing is to keep freshly cut, wet wood from splitting at the ends as it dries out. For steaming I'd think you'd want those ends open to soak in as much of the heat/moisture as you can. Another trick I learned from my wood shop mentor --- small pieces can be steam bent by soaking them in a bucket of water then microwaving them. Seriously. When soaking them sit a rock on them or something so they stay underwater for a day or so. Then pull them out and nuke. Play with the timing and power to get even heating, but it works great on small stuff.

Looks like Denise started a woodworking forum right here -- I'd love to learn more tricks like the one she shared. With the number of wooden boats and wood parts on boats I'm surprised there isn't more of this stuff here!

And Omaho, I was jealous of you for a minute then I felt better when I realized it's probably -10 degrees up there. It's a balmy 13 here. :)

I got a hold of some teak and made new hatch rails -- that stuff is wonderful. It's so oily it machines like plastic and didn't require sanding.
 

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One of None
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Discussion Starter #7
When we were building wood canvas canoes and restoring some I really got into steam bending. Ash used for stems in canoes steam bends very well. then the white cedar for ribs was really fun. My son and I would do all the ribs in a couple of hours. Soaking wood for long periods helps. Some people use fabric softner in the steamer water but I heard it may make the wood change color.

the best part of steam bending was putting shrimp or lobster in the steamer after the ribs were done! Nice cedar flavored shrimp or lobster are a great finish! :D
 

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Oh yes, woodworking, done a little bit of that over the
last 65 years. Helped my dad build 2 houses, 2 boats and
a whole bunch of cabinet work. My wife and I have this hobby:

Paul and Nancy's Creations Home

Just about pays for itself. Cracks happen. Some of us see them
as a natural happening. Others may see them as something less
than perfect. I have read about all kinds of ways to dry wet wood.
Wrapping in newspaper for 2 to 3 months works pretty well. I am
trying putting them in the freezer. So far it seems quicker. Some put
smaller pieces in the microwave, or bury them in sawdust. Painting
the end grain may take a long time to dry?

Dabnis
 

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Keep the tips coming! This is cool! Most of the time I have to learn the hard way and that is not always fun. The glue on the end and microwave steaming ideas both would (wood?) have saved me grief on past projects. Thanks!
DD
 

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I did the tablesaw pre-resawing "trick" once. I wanted to resaw some cedar to line a chest. You want to be really careful doing this, if you do it at all. My cedar had some tension in it and what happened was "spectacular". The wood pinched the blade and caused so much heat the blade started to warp. A warped blade caused more friction and more heat and more warping. By the time I reached the off switch smoke was being produced. Removing the wood revealed my Forrest blade imitating a Lays potato chip. What is truly remarkable is once the blade cooled off, it was as flat as it was before this happened. Now I only resaw on my bandsaw using a wide resaw blade.
 

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The glue-ends trick I did on some cut logs that were too nice for firewood. Since I have no immediate plans for them, and they're going from living in the woods to piled up in the corner of a heated/cooled shop, I painted them so they won't split. They'll probably sit there for a decade or so. Should be dry by then! If it was something I wanted to use soon I'd go to the Amish lumber yard and get something already dried. They have an amazing selection of local woods and exotics. Prices are reasonable too.
 

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Toe Rails?

This sounds like the kind of thread I should ask this question.

I am planning on replacing the toe rails on a 60s vintage Allied boat. How does one make the toe rails conform to the outline of the deck.... are they typically steamed or are the pulled in cold. Also are they typically formed as one peice that has been scarfed together or are the peices assembled in place?
 

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In the past when steaming wood I would allow extra length ( with larger steam box ) which would be cut off tho eliminate any end splitting, also grain is important, as grain runout is not good
 

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Doug,

Forgot this. A moisture meter will tell you if the wood is really
wet, but only on the surface. Many pieces will still be wet deeper
down, they may look dry but will feel heavy. I weigh each piece
on an accurate digital readout kitchen scale, then re-weigh a month
or so later. When the peice no longer looses weight it is ready
to work with. Yesterday I pulled 6 pieces from the freezer, put them
on the bench to weigh after the frost melts. I forgot to go back
down to weigh them. This morning I found 3 of them had developed
cracks just overnight. I will have to discount those.

Dabnis
 

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One of None
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Discussion Starter #16
If I remember right the timing for steaming is 1 hr steam per inch of thickness.
Re-sawing, yes, always have a wedge handy to keep the kerf open.
Tommays! So that's how you match a hatch to the deck! Thanks!

Oh the steamer we have (unused now) is turkey fryer burner and stainless steel beer keg, with copper pipe soldered in the plug, and a radiator hose (automotive) into the insulated 12" round sheet metal pipe with caps. and a rack inside to stack the ribs. whew! did make steam! Had to use gloves to reach in!

Salty, you would need a very long steel pipe, pvc goes too soft. preparation is everything.how to get the toe rail in place and clamped to stay is the big problem. slight curves are quite easy just by soaking wood for many weeks, I've never tried bending teak.. has me wondering now.. it's oily.. I guess that would make it easier to bend.
 

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If I was doing a toe rail I would build a 14' steam box out of 1.5" foiled insulation board and at that length you would need 2 steam sources, Wagner wallpaper steamers, a couple of propane fired kettles on a camp fire stove or a setup like Denises would work great, however, I think advantage goes to Denises setup cause you have to use a freshly emptied Keg :)

I would have everything I needed to fasten the rail ready. I would have laid out a couple lengths of rail material and do all the pre-cuts, holes for fasteners and the lap joints at all ends. then I would steam one length at a time, when it was ready ( couple hours ) I would start at one end and fasten & bend as I worked my way around. You've got to move along pretty deliberately as the longer it takes to achive the bend, the more springback you'll have to deal with



PS;
Where's Charlie, you know he's got good tips
 

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One of None
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Discussion Starter #19
A few years ago when visiting mystic seaport museum I was watching the crew planking the Amistad replica with I think was 2" white oak I didn't see it but I'm sure they were steaming some of those those planks lol
 
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