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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I need to remove all the bottom paint on my 1970 Pearson 26, since a lot is already flaking off, and want to know if it is worth the effort and expense to barrier coat the entire bottom before reapplying the bottom paint. The boat is hauled every winter, and does not have any blisters (yet) and it appears to never have been barrier coated before. I do plan on sanding the keel down to bare metal and using West system epoxy to seal that. Since the hull has done fine for 40+years, does it make sense to worry about a barrier coat now?
 

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I know people will disagree here , but I don't use barrier coat . Also I would say that your boat is 70' and things are good. Why change anything ? I would reason that if your keel is good and you haul every winter, coating it with epox. might upset a good track record .
 

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I certainly wouldn't bother. As posted it makes a lot less sense if you haul each year. Besides without a good dry hull it only seals moisture in, which can actually lead to blistering. It takes a long time to dry a hull that has absorbed moisture, as they all do, for decades. Not to mention the expense.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks for the replies. I have been leaning towards not barrier coating the hull, since it has done fine all these years. I do think the cast iron keel needs to be more protected since there was some evidence of rust when I hauled for the winter.
 

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Capt'n Ron: "Engines like their oil, like a sailor likes their rum"
Martin: "Why is that, Cap'n Ron?"
Capt'n Ron: "Nobody knows!"

Can't help but think of that exchange when these issues are raised. Tons of opinion, very little real evidence, occasional anecdotes. Just because you've made it this far, says nothing. If you smoke without cancer for 20 years, should one not stop?

I have no idea whether barrier is absolutely necessary. When I last scrapped down to zero, I was faced with the same decision. This is the way I came down on it. If I took a pass and learned to regret it, I would kick myself. If I apply it and don't get blisters, I may have wasted money, but will never know.

Which is the better bet that I'm okay? It wasn't that hard to decide to apply a coat.
 

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Be careful removing the old bottom paint. Avoid disturbing the surface of the hull. It must be fairly non porous. Don't put any scratches in it. I wear a full face respirator, a Tyvek suit, gloves and use a DA sander to smooth the "old bottom paint. You can use the residual paint as a fairing coat and sand it to near transparency. It provides a smooth hull, a good surface for adhesion and doesn't abrade the gelcoat. When I first did this I discovered my hull has been barrier coated. As I slowly removed old bottom paint the underlying coating was revealed. It isn't a big job to sand it once the layers of old stuff are gone. I do it as part of painting every year and I do enjoy a smooth bottom.:cool: I don't DA the new paint for smoothness. It is ablative and takes care of itself.

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It wasn't that hard to decide to apply a coat.
It requires a very dry hull or you are sealing moisture in. That is not always easy to accomplish. Any possible future blistering, especially since there has been none for decades on the po's boat, would only be cosmetic.
 

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if it doesn't have blisters by now it is probably never going to get them. Waste of money

paul - barrier coat epoxy vendor (progressive epoxy polymers inc)
 

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"to B or not to B, that is the question", sorry have too Shakespeare for a second.

My 2 cents: when I bought my first boat 10 years ago I stripped the bottom using the peel away and other chemical stripping products. It was by far the dirtiest, shi$%#est job I've ever done. I basically just thru everything away associated with the project. Clothes, tools, everything. When I was done I had a nice clean hull, no blisters, no defects, no problem. I decided not to barrier coat. I put a couple coats of bottom on and one more each year for the next five years and each year different sections of the bottom would just flake off. The bottom paint would not bond with the hull. So I striped again, scraping and sanding this time, much easier. Still no blisters. Two coats of barrier, and bottom paint. No more problems with the paint flaking after the next 5 years. Your decision.
 

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An epoxy barrier coat makes sense on a brand new boat or on one that is dry as a bone and that is not probably the case with yours. If the boat is not completely dry a barrier coat can be a big mistake : It will maintain all the existent humidity inside the hull.

If, as you say, you take the boat out of water every year you don't need one, even if your boat is dry.
 

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I like this thread , all good points made here . I never really thought about the thought that if you barrier coat a wet hull it stays wet . I like that thought , I like working in the boat yard too . My work basically consisted of grinding the blisters, filling with 3M Marine Filler , sanding smooth and 2 gals. of Z Spar bottom paint. the job is now 4 yrs. old and no blisters and the paint is still decent. However i'm going to haul after Christmas. I'm going to try to post some pictures of the last time I was in the yard .I love this little yard because they let you do all the work yourself. But back to the original premise of this thread , if ain't broke well you know.
 

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" Two coats of barrier, and bottom paint. No more problems with the paint flaking after the next 5 years. Your decision.
That's been my experience with 2 boats: Once the bottom was stripped and coated with a barrier coat (I used Interlux 2000), the bottom paint flaking problem was gone. Three coats of ablative paint were applied on that first boat and it wasn't necessary to touch up the bottom paint for 5 years. The second boat that I stripped--only 2 yrs ago--is holding up very well, also.

BTW, that first boat had a steel centerboard. I had it sandblasted and then coated it immediately with the Interlux 2000 and it was still going strong well beyond 5 years. Suggest you sandblast your iron keel if at all possible before epoxy-coating it.
 

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An epoxy barrier coat makes sense on a brand new boat......
Ironically, I'm told that Jeanneau recommended against a barrier coat on my boat, when she was new. I'm the second owner and was told this by the local dealer. The hull below the water line is made of vinyl ester and, for some reason I can't articulate, they only want you to rough the surface and paint. The rudder is an exception and loaded with barrier coats.

Future strip downs and repaints of the hull are fielder's choice for barrier coating. I think that is a question of how she is stripped and whether mechanic sanders get into the surface too much.
 
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