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How many have had the bat problem in thier sails? I noticed the droppings near the mast a few days ago and raised the main, and lord and behold I had at least 10 of the little rodents in the main makeing it there home. So instead of killing them I made a thing called a bat box. Hopefully this will keep them out of the sails, also put some moth balls in the sail folds.
Last night sitting in the pilot house I watched them come and go into the bat box for a couple of hours. I am not sure but i think I now have 20 of the little critters moved in. I will not put running water in for them no matter how much they want it, he he he have to draw a line someplace!!:eek:
 

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Broad Reachin'
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We were cruising about 5 miles offshore headed to a port ~30 miles away on Lake Michigan last summer and noticed a bat circling our rig. He ended up landing on the mast about 25' above the deck and then occassionally dive bombing us before finally settling in on the sail track. As soon as we got about 1 mile out from port, I used the boat hook to gently nudge him away.

We had departed before sun-up so I assume he had spent the night high up on the mast (possibly in the mast track) and was disturbed when we raised the sails. I've got a couple of pictures I'll post later.
 

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We were cruising about 5 miles offshore headed to a port ~30 miles away on Lake Michigan last summer and noticed a bat circling our rig. He ended up landing on the mast about 25' above the deck and then occassionally dive bombing us before finally settling in on the sail track. As soon as we got about 1 mile out from port, I used the boat hook to gently nudge him away.

We had departed before sun-up so I assume he had spent the night high up on the mast (possibly in the mast track) and was disturbed when we raised the sails. I've got a couple of pictures I'll post later.
Cool!

I wonder if you installed a bat box if the bats would stay with your boat? I imagine they would sleep in the box during the day and come out when you are at anchor.

Might be a solution to the mosquito problem?

I don't know how hard it would be to clean guano off your deck though.

Is 'Bats in the rigging' the nautical equivalent of 'Bats in the belfry'?
 

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Your story surprizes me ,as I cut down yard trees all the time, and have yet to find any bats living in those bat boxes I remove before cutting. I've found them every where else!.....Dale
 

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How many have had the bat problem in thier sails? I noticed the droppings near the mast a few days ago and raised the main, and lord and behold I had at least 10 of the little rodents in the main makeing it there home. So instead of killing them I made a thing called a bat box. Hopefully this will keep them out of the sails, also put some moth balls in the sail folds.
Last night sitting in the pilot house I watched them come and go into the bat box for a couple of hours. I am not sure but i think I now have 20 of the little critters moved in. I will not put running water in for them no matter how much they want it, he he he have to draw a line someplace!!:eek:
Cool!! Insectivorous bats (the vast majority of the species in N. America) are one of the best bug-controllers around. They eat a fairly good fraction of their own mass in flying insects every night. Just make sure that, as with all wild critters, you leave any apparently sick ones alone.
 

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When you get back to the dock, place the bat box on a high piling next to the boat. They'll stay with the box and keep the entire area around your boat bug free. They are amazing creatures that consume their entire body weight in flying insects every night.

Gary :cool:
 

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When you get back to the dock, place the bat box on a high piling next to the boat. They'll stay with the box and keep the entire area around your boat bug free.
If you do move the box, make sure you orient it (with respect to the sun) the same way as it originally was.

They are amazing creatures that consume their entire body weight in flying insects every night.
They are amazing, but that's a bit of an exaggeration. Most species eat something on the order of a third of their body mass in insects every 24 hours. This is about on a par with most small homeothermic (="warm blooded") critters, most of their energy intake goes toward keeping them warm. Thermoregulation and energy intake is such a problem in bats that most species actually "hibernate" (officially, torpor), rather than simply sleep, every day to conserve energy.
 

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If you do move the box, make sure you orient it (with respect to the sun) the same way as it originally was.



They are amazing, but that's a bit of an exaggeration. Most species eat something on the order of a third of their body mass in insects every 24 hours. This is about on a par with most small homeothermic (="warm blooded") critters, most of their energy intake goes toward keeping them warm. Thermoregulation and energy intake is such a problem in bats that most species actually "hibernate" (officially, torpor), rather than simply sleep, every day to conserve energy.
Na na na na na na na na na na na na na na na na..............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
 

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Our California cousins bought a ranch in Sonoma that had a 120 year old farmhouse as the main house. After they moved in some neigbours came by and at some point said, "you know you have bats don't you?" Needless to say, they DIDN'T know but weren't worried about a few bats in their attic - it was unvented and they didn't think it would be much of a problem.

No problem that is, until WE arrived! We were having dinner outside at dusk and the bats started leaving in ones & two's & fives - this just kept going for 45 minutes. While my wife & I enjoyed it, their faces kept getting longer and longer until I pointed out the complete lack of bugs, despite the fact they were living just above the high water mark of a floodplain in an agro area. We should have been getting eaten alive but there were NO bugs at all.

They finally called in the "Bat Man" from the agro department and got them out and moved into one of the barns. Turned out there were hundreds of the little buggers living in their attic. They only had one little hole about 3/4" as their doorway so they must have been lined up like a theatre line to get out.

If you live in an area that has the little critters you should do everything you can to encourage them - they make an amazing difference.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
From what I have read, the type are brown bats. kind of small about the size of a mouse, body wise and about a 9" to 12 " wingspan. The guano is no problem as I put a pan under the box. They are said to counsume around 14,000 bugs in a single feeding.
There are enough no -see-ems (flying teeth) to keep them well fed.
They are fun to watch fly, great at the arobeics. Dang I have my own air force. whoop ti doo.. beats the heck out of a dog or cat .... I am still no putting in running water for them ... I like the low maintenance pet theroy (LMP) .... cheers
 

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Na na na na na na na na na na na na na na na na.............................................................
hehehe.....I was going over some notes last night for my Evolution of Altruism lecture (vampire bats are, believe it or not, a classic example of this). So, bats were kinda on my mind.

The exam will be Tuesday. You won't need a Scantron, but please bring a pen and a large format blue book.
 

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I thought the food consumption rate was something I saw on the Discover Channel, but us OLD guys are plagued with failing minds you know. Here's something, however, that I just dug up that puts the feeding rate in perspective.

We studied food intake of and estimated ingested energy in female and male Myotis daubentonii during the periods of pregnancy (period 1, 8 May–4 June) and of intense spermatogenetic activity (period 2, 24 July–22 August) over 8 years (1996–2003) in central Germany. We used radiotelemetry to determine the time spent foraging and marked animals with chemiluminescent light-sticks to determine prey attack rates. Body length, body mass, moisture content, and caloric content of chironomids, the main prey of Daubenton’s bats, were measured to estimate the nightly food intake and, in consequence, energy intake. Pregnant females spent significantly more time foraging than males during period 1 and females during the post-lactation period. In contrast, male foraged longer during the period of highest spermatogenetic activity than during late spring and also significantly longer than post-lactating females. Based on a mean number of 8.3 prey attacks per minute, the time spent foraging, and a capture success rate of either 50 or 92%, calculated intake values with a feeding rate of 7.6 insects per minute (=92% capture success) were more consistent with literature data for other insectivorous bats than that of values calculated on the basis of a capture success rate of 50%. In the high capture-success model, calculated insect intake of female bats was 8.0 g during pregnancy and 4.9 g per day during post-lactation, providing 5.0 and 3.0 kJ of ingested energy per gram body mass per day. Calculated intake of male bats was 3.6 g insects per day during late spring and 8.0 g during period of intensive spermatogenesis, providing 2.6 and 5.7 kJ of ingested energy per gram body mass.

Neat stuff! :)

Gary :cool:
 

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I thought the food consumption rate was something I saw on the Discover Channel, but us OLD guys are plagued with failing minds you know. Here's something, however, that I just dug up that puts the feeding rate in perspective.

We studied food intake of and estimated ingested energy in female and male Myotis daubentonii during the periods of pregnancy (period 1, 8 May–4 June) and of intense spermatogenetic activity (period 2, 24 July–22 August) over 8 years (1996–2003) in central Germany. We used radiotelemetry to determine the time spent foraging and marked animals with chemiluminescent light-sticks to determine prey attack rates. Body length, body mass, moisture content, and caloric content of chironomids, the main prey of Daubenton’s bats, were measured to estimate the nightly food intake and, in consequence, energy intake. Pregnant females spent significantly more time foraging than males during period 1 and females during the post-lactation period. In contrast, male foraged longer during the period of highest spermatogenetic activity than during late spring and also significantly longer than post-lactating females. Based on a mean number of 8.3 prey attacks per minute, the time spent foraging, and a capture success rate of either 50 or 92%, calculated intake values with a feeding rate of 7.6 insects per minute (=92% capture success) were more consistent with literature data for other insectivorous bats than that of values calculated on the basis of a capture success rate of 50%. In the high capture-success model, calculated insect intake of female bats was 8.0 g during pregnancy and 4.9 g per day during post-lactation, providing 5.0 and 3.0 kJ of ingested energy per gram body mass per day. Calculated intake of male bats was 3.6 g insects per day during late spring and 8.0 g during period of intensive spermatogenesis, providing 2.6 and 5.7 kJ of ingested energy per gram body mass.
Encarnação, J.A. and Dietz, M. 2006. Estimation of food intake and ingested energy in Daubenton’s bats (Myotis daubentonii) during pregnancy and spermatogenesis. Eur. J of Wildlife Res. 52(4): 221-227.

BTW: 5.7 kJ/gram/day works out to about 30% of body mass ingested per day (depending on the fat content of the insects).
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Sorry not vampire bats here just the small brown ones,so Dracula stay home.

Oh Yeah ... welcome to the animal planet ... we are just visitors

cheers
 

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Careful with your cute little house guests. Between 1-2% of all bats are actively carrying rabies. Do NOT get bitten by one of these little guys, it'll mean that you have to get a rabies series of vaccinations which is >$10,000 and really (I mean really) painful.

Of course you could opt not to have the post-exposure vaccination but to date there has never been a single substantiated cased of survival from a rabies infection. It's one of the few 100% fatal diseases out there. So bite = around a 1% chance of death. Not odds I'd like.

Bats don't usually try and bite people and shouldn't be a cause for panic, but I guess what I'm trying to say is don't mess with them up close because if they get scared and bite you, it's not going to be good.

MedSailor
 

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Bats don't usually try and bite people and shouldn't be a cause for panic, but I guess what I'm trying to say is don't mess with them up close because if they get scared and bite you, it's not going to be good. MedSailor
Good advice for pretty well ALL wildlife.
 

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Good advice for pretty well ALL wildlife.
Perhaps but the rabies prevalence in species other than bats is much MUCH lower. The CDC is so trigger happy about bats that they even recommend post-exposure vaccination for those who have been near a bat and can't be sure they bat didn't touch them. Apparently bats can bite and you don't even know it. See an excerpt below from a medical textbook I use daily at work.

Be safe,
MedSailor

Photo of how small a bat bite can be:


----------------Copyright 2012 UpToDate Online----------------
Bat exposures — The most common rabies virus variants identified in infected humans in the United States are bat-related; therefore, any bat exposure needs thorough evaluation. (See 'Animal rabies epidemiology' above.)

The risk for rabies resulting from an encounter with a bat is often difficult to assess because of the sometimes imperceptible bite inflicted by this mammal (picture 1). From 1990 to 2007, a total of 34 naturally acquired bat-associated human cases of rabies were reported. In 15 cases, physical contact was reported but no bite was documented, and in 11 cases no known bat encounter was reported at all [4]. However, it should be noted that by the time rabies is diagnosed, getting an accurate history is usually precluded.

The ACIP makes the following recommendations regarding bats:

Postexposure prophylaxis should be considered when direct contact between a human and a bat has occurred (see 'Animal rabies epidemiology' above).
Postexposure prophylaxis is not necessary if the person was aware of the bat at all times while in an enclosed space and is certain that there was no bite, scratch, or mucous membrane exposure.

If the bat is captured and can be tested for rabies, postexposure prophylaxis in persons without direct exposure can await the results of prompt testing. If uncertainty about the need for prophylaxis still exists, the local public health authority should be consulted.

The ACIP also recommends that postexposure prophylaxis should be considered for an individual who has been in a room with a bat and who may be unable to rule out any physical contact. Such individuals might include: 1) a sleeping person who awakens to find a bat in the room; 2) an unattended child; 3) a mentally disabled person; or 4) an intoxicated person.
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