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Telstar 28
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Telstar 28
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I'd point out that using butyl is actually easier and simpler than using some of the other sealants, since BUTYL TAPE DOES NOT CURE. You're not under the same time constraints as if you were using something that does have a limited working time. This means you can take your time and make sure the hardware is bedded properly.

Another Grrrrreat post in a long line of them.

Question: Say you're bedding a 6 foot long genoa track, do you think it practical to preinstall all the machine screws first? Seems it would be very tough to get them all to go in at once without disturbing the carefully placed butyl.....
 

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Yes.
Maine,
Going to ask a noob question. can you use butyl tape to bed rope clutches?
Have minor repair to do on the two on my H336.
Thanks
John
 

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If the aluminum framed ports have the frames screwed or bolted to the boat, then sure, butyl tape is perfect... Plastic frameless port lights should be adhered using Dow 795 structural silicone adhesive.

Stuff under the water line, through-hulls near the water line, and anything that may be exposed to significant amounts of fuel, like the diesel deck fill, should also not be bedded using Butyl, since butyl dissolves in petroleum products.

So butyl tape for deck hardware, tracks, chain plates, cleats, clutches etc.
What would you not use it for.

Hull, deck is 5200, you want to super glue effect right.
What about aluminum framed port lights?
Plastic frame less port lights?
 

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Telstar 28
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It isn't strong enough to work with plastic ports that are frameless, which shouldn't be screwed or through-bolted to the cabintop, due to thermal expansion issues.
For port lights, I think butyl tape is perfect as it forms a nice flexible gasket. I see no difference if the frame is metal or plastic as far as butyl tape is concerned.
 

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Jarcher—

Butyl tape is fine for tracks, but you do need to remove the excess properly.

I wouldn't recommend doing just the fastener holes, as that can lead to water collecting under the traveler, and if it freezes, you could get screwed. A cotton swab, like a q-tip, moistened with mineral spirits will often allow you to remove stuff that is difficult to access areas.
 

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Maine Sail, myself and others have addressed potting the core material properly in several threads.

I like the idea! However, I do have a question about sealing the hole in your vessel. Are you planning on the Butyl to prevent water from getting between the layers or are you drilling through solid glass?

If you're drilling through core then I'd consider adding some glass and resin to protect the hole from absorbing moisture. Other than that, it appears that the Butyl will do quite well in your application, and come apart easier that 5200.
 

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You shouldn't need that much butyl tape for the chainplates. Heating the butyl tape and then working it into the gap between the chainplate and the deck with a plastic putty knife is probably your best bet.
 

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If the underlying surface isn't flat for the hatch to sit on, you'd be better off building it up with thickened epoxy or fiberglass to the proper height than using butyl to fill the gap.

Got my rolls of tape, (Thanks Maine) and put them to use this weekend. I removed the fore hatch, the week before the big rains and got back to the boat to put the new hatch in...

The tape is a tad sticky, easy to work with, and I am hoping will work quite well. As my hatch was not 100% flat to the fore peak, two rear corners of the hatch about 1/8" off the deck and around the bends for almost 2"...so I cut a 1" length and attached, that followed by a 2.5" piece, a 4" piece and so on until I built up (or down - depending on how you look at it..) the wedge needed. Then I laid the two overlapping strips on the screw line and had the admiral help me gently lay the new hatch in place.

I used the end of a papermate ink pen to cut screw holes, and use small drill bits as allignment pins to drop the new hatch on. Removed the first drill bit, and replaced with a screw, as with the other 4. The started the remaining screws. Went below to make sure that all was well. So far so good.

New hatch is in place, warming up nicely, and I will take a final turn on the screws later this afternoon.

Lessons learned...using the suggested hardware was best - called for flathead #8 screws, PO used #10 pan head sheet metal screws which stuck up in to the seal area.....MORE tape is better than less tape...I did have one small gap...that I was able to pull/stretch the butyl tape and slide it in as I set the hatch - would have been better to build up the corners more the first go round, as once placed the tape is quite sticky..

Will see how well it has sealed later in the season when the rains come again.

All the best.
 

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Telstar 28
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992 Posts

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Telstar 28
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992 Posts
I would add a couple of points.

First, butyl tape should be your choice for any through-bolted hardware that is above the waterline, with the exception of anything that is exposed to diesel, gasoline or other petroleum products on a regular basis, since they will damage the butyl tape.

Second, when using the countersink bit to bevel holes in the gelcoat, I would recommend running it in reverse. This helps prevent it from chipping the gelcoat and also allows you better control over the depth of the countersinking.
 

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If he used silicone household caulk, rather than acrylic or butyl caulk (which is not the same as the butyl tape in case anyone is wondering), you're likely going to have to sand the fiberglass lightly to get rid of the contaminants from the silicone caulk, or nothing, not even butyl tape, will stick to the area properly.

Does it matter what the port light is made of? Specifically, I have a couple aluminum-framed port lights in which the window pane itself is Lexan. I'm assuming the butyl tape will work just fine with the Lexan?

And I also will join the chorus of thousands saying thanks so much for the detailed post about how to bed using butyl tape. I found a local RV place and bought two 50-foot rolls of the stuff for a whopping $8 each!

Yesterday I went up to my boat where it's on the hard and used some of the butyl to re-bed a small hatch above the dinette, which had been leaking slightly.

I discovered that some previous owner had bedded everything with what certainly appears to be white household door and window caulk. And all of it is leaking. After reading your how-to, I'm planning on pulling and re-bedding everything with the butyl tape.

Thanks!!
 

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MaineSail,
Looks like you are using a aluminum cleat with stainless screws. Will the Butly tape provide adequate isolation from the metals contacting and causing cathodic corrosion?

Also, what is the best way to maintain stainless standing rigging when it gets a rust colored tarnish look? Is a scotch pad or metal polish ok to use on cables and fitting?
Thanks
Butyl tape should provide a fairly decent galvanic isolation layer. It is very difficult to squeeze all the butyl tape out of a space between two surfaces, even if the surfaces are nearly perfectly matched.

As for standing rigging, A scotchbrite pad will help, but treating the stainless steel is probably going to help for a longer period of time. I've written a review of Spotless Stainless on my blog. It is a product that is designed to clean and help treat stainless steel by passivating it. You can read the review here.
 
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