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Old soul
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Well we live dangerously then as there are well over a dozen breweries within a half hour drive of our farm (lots of good water here), Heck I've included what we have in our basement...yup, we are serious about the art of fermentation!
Good on ya! Beer is serious stuff -- at least good beer is. :)

FWIW...there had been discussion here about not having drinks when underway but ok when at anchor. I personally have not heard of any issues with such, at least with the folks we know, but technically you are still underway when at anchor (just not making way) and thus subject to USCC reg's on such. Never stopped us once ground tackle is in place, but we also remain aware we may need to "drive" again!
I've seen this issue pop up online a few times. It's interesting because in Canada it is perfectly legal to drink on a cruising-level boat* while it is anchored. It is considered being "affixed to ground", just like being moored or tied to the dock. So you are not underway -- at least not in Canada.

I've heard that in the USA this legal definition varies from state to state, but I've not really looked into it.

*There is a legal definition of a "cruising level boat" (which is my term, not the legal term). As I recall it includes having a proper galley, head and maybe sleeping berths. I'm sure some legal beagle can dig it up if need be.
 

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S/V Interlude, PSC31
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Good on ya! Beer is serious stuff -- at least good beer is. :)

I've seen this issue pop up online a few times. It's interesting because in Canada it is perfectly legal to drink on a cruising-level boat* while it is anchored. It is considered being "affixed to ground", just like being moored or tied to the dock. So you are not underway -- at least not in Canada.

I've heard that in the USA this legal definition varies from state to state, but I've not really looked into it.

*There is a legal definition of a "cruising level boat" (which is my term, not the legal term). As I recall it includes having a proper galley, head and maybe sleeping berths. I'm sure some legal beagle can dig it up if need be.
Agreed on the beer!

...as far as the BUI all I know for a fact is that being at anchor still constitutes being underway according to regs here in the US, at least in Virginia. I can only imagine that given the budget and area patrolled, that USCC is not gunna be boarding a sailboat, well anchored, without just cause such as clearly drunk folks aboard engaged in unsafe activities, and even then there are too many folks making way that need to be looked after to bother with those at anchor.

It is also not readily known that the rules apply to all watercraft including canoes, kayaks, etc. just like you can get a DUI when riding a bicycle! Happened to friend of mine, which is how I became aware. Had to go fetch him and his bike, never knew! It was ironic that it happened to him as he knew he was gunna be drinking (a lot!), lived about two miles from the scene of the crime and purposefully took his bike so he wouldn't need to drive. He was pretty drunk though, and actually swerved his bike in front of the police car, which had to swerve to miss him. A "dough " Homer Simpson moment!
 

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Barquito
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If you are going to drink while at anchor, consider the boat is on it's own. Don't leave the cabin/cockpit. If you think there is a chance you will need to attend to something, don't drink. That is my thinking. Then again, I am wasted, and it is 10 in the morning, and I am at work...
 

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Old soul
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On our boat there is no drinking (booze) while we're underway. And that includes multi-day passages. Once the anchor is securely down, and there is no expectation of nasty weather or other issues, only then can the beers come out.

Of course, one can never over-indulge in a floating home. There is always the risk of falling over, or taking a nasty fall down the companion way, or banging your head, or...

But we're never talking about getting shyte-faced. If you can't drink reasonably, then don't drink at all.
 

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On our boat there is no drinking (booze) while we're underway. And that includes multi-day passages. Once the anchor is securely down, and there is no expectation of nasty weather or other issues, only then can the beers come out.

Of course, one can never over-indulge in a floating home. There is always the risk of falling over, or taking a nasty fall down the companion way, or banging your head, or...

But we're never talking about getting shyte-faced. If you can't drink reasonably, then don't drink at all.

Probably a good idea we don't move this from our basement to the boat! Only because of the electrical drain on the system aboard, right?
 

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There is a problem with alcohol consumption and boating. People are getting killed because of operating a boat under the influence.... just as with autos.

https://www.newsday.com/news/region-state/brianna-s-law-nys-boating-1.31984291
No one said anything about consuming, while operating. I was kidding about you saying you don’t imbibe at any opportunity, which could be read as you never imbibe and head the club of others like you. There are some, of course.

While I can’t prove it, having boated from Western LIS to RI all my life, there is no question in my mind that boaters are more aggressive down your way. I wouldn’t be surprised if consumption, while underway, was more prevalent too.

Most powerboats I know only go out for the day. I bet the trip home is the suspect one. Most sailors (not all) I know, will drop the hook and stay out. They probably start imbibing at the same time, they just don’t operate again until the next morning.

I’m afraid the boater safety course will have zero impact on it. The operator needs to be concerned they’ll get caught.
 

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Discussion Starter #90
The issue as I perceive it is the lack of self control and discipline. People who have high blood alcohol act like jerks wherever the are.... driving, walking down the street, sitting in the cockpit or operating a boat. Some jerky behavior endangers others... some annoys others... like noisy "parties"... or playing loud music. Power boats go faster and are more dangerous obviously.

I have nothing against what I call "responsible" consumption... which is too hard to define and as I noted people lack discipline and self control. There is no doubt in my mind from my experience that there is a substance abuse problem in the country... and I don't think sailors east of LIS are exempt. After all drinking IS a social activity.

There is a problem in the country of the lack of respect for the rights of others... and for the commons.
 

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Old soul
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The issue as I perceive it is the lack of self control and discipline. People who have high blood alcohol act like jerks wherever the are.... driving, walking down the street, sitting in the cockpit or operating a boat. Some jerky behavior endangers others... some annoys others... like noisy "parties"... or playing loud music. Power boats go faster and are more dangerous obviously.
Well now, hold on there buddy. That's an over-generalization. Not all people with high blood alcohol counts act like jerks. Many just fall asleep :eek:. And jerks don't need alcohol to be jerks. It may enhance this behaviour in some, but my observation is that it doesn't create it. A jerk is a jerk, with or without booze. And the opposite is true.

There is no doubt in my mind from my experience that there is a substance abuse problem in the country... and I don't think sailors east of LIS are exempt. After all drinking IS a social activity.
Very true. The USA (and to a lesser extent other Western nations as well) is experiencing a serious substance abuse problem, although it's less to do with alcohol and more to do with so-called prescription medications. It's become so bad that, for the first time ever, the average life expectancy in the USA is now in decline.

Researchers have labeled this phenomena "Deaths of Despair."

There is a problem in the country of the lack of respect for the rights of others... and for the commons.
Completely agree, but I don't think its fair to blame booze for this. At best, I'd say alcohol over-consumption is a symptom of this effect, not a cause.
 

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Administrator
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I have nothing against what I call "responsible" consumption...
Where is the fun in responsible consumption? May as well stay sober :)

Beer is serious stuff -- at least good beer is. :)




I do find theres distinct cultural differences around the world with booze. At times its almost stereotypical... French can not physically eat unless they have a glass of wine. But they never get drunk. Their beer is about 8% alcohol but they shovel it in. Americans (IE people from the USA) usually have a dry ship and that means they take no booze at all for a long passage. Australians suckle on beer the whole time but its 4% or less. Canadians drink a lot because well, why not? The Eastern Block really does drink Vodka like the movies.
Also with Americans with 'hard liquor' and the Caribbean with rum, is weird because they drink a lot of it... where I wouldn't have had a glass of spirits in the last 10 years. The younger people in Australia drink more spirits now than when I first went to bars. But ive never seen a French person ask for Pernod (in France... they do in the Carib)

It weird to think that one of the interesting 'educations' one can get from cruising is learned in the bar of the port you're in. Just last night, before I collapsed dead drunk on the bar room floor, I thought of the differences in the bar staff in the London pub compared to a bar in Key West. Last night I didn't notice the bar staff. Go to the bar, staff quickly efficiently put your beer in front of you, click your card, no tip expected, wander back to the seat, drink. But the remembered bar in Key West there was only one dude behind the bar and he was as slow as #$%& pouring each drink because he was trying to be entertaining to make a tip and when you were finally served a lough DING smashes the inner ear as he announces his tip with the bar bell. I remember looking at that bar and thinking this bar is about HIM, whereas the bar in London is about me.

Each culture has things a tourist loves and things a tourist doesn't like or doesn't appreciate. Travel is magnificent for its education. :)


Mark
 

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Some people actually drink wine because it pairs well with food
Some people actually drink wine because they like the different tastes ( refined pallets)
 

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bell ringer
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Some people actually drink wine because it pairs well with food
Some people actually drink wine because they like the different tastes ( refined pallets)
I drink it sometimes because I HAVE TO as it has been a while since I've had any fruit and wine is just fruit with fun added to it
 

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I just did a quick search through this thread and found no mention of Crabbies.

You all are neophytes.
 

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The issue as I perceive it is the lack of self control and discipline. People who have high blood alcohol act like jerks wherever the are......
Some do, but not all. I’m at my sportsman’s club right now. Duck and pheasant hunting is done for the day. We all had several cocktails when done and are cleaning up for dinner. Not a jerk in the bunch and I’m sure all would fail a breathalyzer. Laughter. Big lying stories of our conquests. No jerks.

I find there are three alcohol outcomes:

Happy and social
Angry and aggressive
Can’t hold their liquor and trip over themselves.

If in the latter two camps, one should really pass or limit. It’s strictly genetic.
 

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Mike,

Now see that’s where we differ, I like the old style beers that have been around for a long time, that have stood the test of time.

And I NEVER drink out of an aluminum can, ug. Back when I was a kid after 10:00 you could not buy six packs, but you could get “containers” of draft to go. They were about like Chinese food containers and the beer tasted it. Anyone else here remember that? And PBR for 95¢ a six pack. Yeah, I was a real beeraholic for a few years. Sobered up before I turned 21.

Guinness comes to mind but also my dear ol Crabbies.

“The story of Crabbie’s began in Edinburgh, 1801 when Miller Crabbie became the father of a young boy – John Crabbie.

Born into a thriving grocery and spirit merchant family business in one of the poorest and heavily industrialised areas of Edinburgh, John Crabbie capitalised on the nearby port of Leith, providing him access to ingredients from all over the world.”

https://www.crabbiesgingerbeer.com/en/story/

I was surprised to find Guinness and Mckeeson very popular here in the tropics. And I’ve developed a fondness for the Makeesons. But I can’t find Crabbies, not even in Antigua. In Germany I love their Weiss beers, very hard to get anything this side of the pond that comes close. Not impossible for but very rare.

“Crabbies on ice, it’s nice”

And very traditional.
 

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Old soul
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Come now... IPAs have been around as long as beer has been brewed. I'm also partial to a chewey porter. Dark creamy coffee, chocolaty -- yum. I like a tangy wheat beer, and I've been enjoying some of the newer sours, although I can only take those in moderation. Guinness is a fine brew, just a little mild for my tastes. I prefer Murphy's Stout if I'm going for that taste.

As for the can ... never drink from one. Just a lot easier to carry back to the boat, and stores a lot easier. Also, crushes down to a small volume. Glass accumulates way too fast.

Crabbies... not sure I've had one. Not big into ginger beer, although I did make some back when I was brewing.

We're going to have to discuss this in person soon. You bring the Crabbies, I'll bring the IPAs and porters, and we'll hash it out good!
 
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