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Come now... IPAs have been around as long as beer has been brewed. !

Hmmmmm. Mike, do you think I look like the forum fact checker?

You've missed by at least 10,000 years!

The first documented hop cultivation was in 736, in the Hallertau region of present-day Germany, although the first mention of the use of hops in brewing in that country was 1079
My life study is proving beer was brewed before bread was made. Beer was why "we" became sedentary and grew crops.

Its able to be brewed using airborne yeast ie accidentally.
 

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and I've been enjoying some of the newer sours
These are new beers for me, and I have a hate, hate, hate, love, hate relationship with them. It seems like I dislike most of them, but then I have a couple that are some of the best beers I've drank. Those few good experiences keep me trying sours, but mostly I dislike them. Until I like one. I'm pretty sure I'd only like them on draft, and not packaged.

I imbibed too much once on a fantastic sour - drinking only it all night. That was a mistake. Not the night, but the morning after. Much worse than other beers that way, and also worse in a different way.

Supposedly, cans are a better way than bottles for keeping beer fresh and tasting as intended. I don't like drinking out of cans, but they make way more practical sense for storage, weight, and garbage reasons on a boat. In the San Blas Islands in Panama, one just leaves the empty cans on deck or put them in a bag on the rail, and the Kuna's paddle by and take them away for you. They get paid for them by metal recyclers. Can't get more convenient than that.

Mark
 

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Old soul
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Hmmmmm. Mike, do you think I look like the forum fact checker?

You've missed by at least 10,000 years!
OK, maybe the first IPA was only brewed 9,999 years ago.;)

My life study is proving beer was brewed before bread was made. Beer was why "we" became sedentary and grew crops.

Its able to be brewed using airborne yeast ie accidentally.
Actually, I think there's some serious scholarship that supports your life's works here Mark. Keep investigating!

These are new beers for me, and I have a hate, hate, hate, love, hate relationship with them. It seems like I dislike most of them, but then I have a couple that are some of the best beers I've drank. Those few good experiences keep me trying sours, but mostly I dislike them. Until I like one. I'm pretty sure I'd only like them on draft, and not packaged.
I'm with you. Discovered them a couple of years ago. Absolutely loved the first one I had (a small batch brewed at a small brewery in northern Ontario). Then had to try every one that came along. Most I could only take in small doses, but then lightning struck again and I'm back for more.
 

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I'm about as much of a connoisseur of beer as I am a connoisseur of turkey. Two or three times a year is enough. Maybe when all the beef and chicken is gone I'll take up turkey and beer. Wild Turkey of course.
 

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HANUMAN
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Did someone say Beer? Oh thank Buddha I almost forgot. Gonna crack open a Tree House Julius and pour myself a Weller Antique 107.

Cheers and thanks for the reminder!
 

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bell ringer
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These are new beers for me, and I have a hate, hate, hate, .....

I imbibed too much once on a fantastic sour - drinking only it all night. That was a mistake. Not the night, but the morning after. Much worse than other beers that way, and also worse in a different way.
what up with sour beers? did someone mess up a batch of beer and decide to spin it to the idiots who will drink anything if they are told it is "crafted"

that stuff is just nasty and right up there with seeing how hot of a pepper you can eat
 

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Come now... IPAs have been around as long as beer has been brewed. I'm also partial to a chewey porter. Dark creamy coffee, chocolaty -- yum. I like a tangy wheat beer, and I've been enjoying some of the newer sours, although I can only take those in moderation. Guinness is a fine brew, just a little mild for my tastes. I prefer Murphy's Stout if I'm going for that taste.

As for the can ... never drink from one. Just a lot easier to carry back to the boat, and stores a lot easier. Also, crushes down to a small volume. Glass accumulates way too fast.

Crabbies... not sure I've had one. Not big into ginger beer, although I did make some back when I was brewing.

We're going to have to discuss this in person soon. You bring the Crabbies, I'll bring the IPAs and porters, and we'll hash it out good!
You are on mate. So long as we can still travel to make it happen.
 

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Discussion Starter #109
Speaking of nasty what do you all think of piss water -AKA Rolling Rock?
This is kind of a stupid remark... people have different tastes and are entitled to them and shouldn't be ridiculed for them.

Why does it even matter what beers, or wines or booze people like?

If you want to list your favorite drinks... that would be ok...
 

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Old soul
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Speaking of nasty what do you all think of piss water -AKA Rolling Rock?
It's like all the other light lagers out there; rather bland with little hoppy or barley taste. Needs to be ice cold or it is too sweet. Thirst-quenching, but really not much to distinguish itself from vast majority of similar mass-market beers.
 

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I find it extraordinary that people piss on light piss!!

Havent you heard about the drink driving laws??

I think by law, in Aus, every pub *must* serve mid-range and light beer.

Full strength is 4 to 5%; Mid range is 3.2% and low is 2% or less. I think... remember Ive been out of Australia for years. :)

Because of that theres some quite good low alcohol beers. I think in the USA, too, theres some good ones that should not be vilified because a drunk put off low alcohol beer may kill you and your family.
I like Coors Light - I certainly LOVE the label that changes colour if its at the right temperature :)
Yes, if doesnt taste the same as a 10% heavy hopped stout... but I cant drink that stuff :)

If I am off the grog I dont want to be standing in the bar with a glass of water. I wanna look like a man even at 2% :)
 

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Well I certainly stepped on the PC hornet nest there.

Maybe that proves my point, RR drinkers (and Coors Light?) are “sensitive men.”

Drink all you want and enjoy....if you can.

Don’t get your knicker hope too tight, I’m just having some fun with this “beer snob” thing.

If you want to get in a real fight we will have discuss the relative merits of Boons Farm and Ripple MD20-20.

http://www.bumwine.com/
 

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bell ringer
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Me? Sensitive????????? Im triggered by that remark!!!!!!!!

Triggered!

IM NOT SENSITIVE!!!!!!!!!!!!!


:gunner
Of course not! You are a manly man standing in the corner drinking your 2% hard stuff about to go all native as Oz isn't going to allow you back in now..
 

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Old soul
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Can we agree that the world always looks better seen through a pint of whatever suds you prefer.

... at least until the next morning when you realize that is wasn't a "light beer" after all.

Actually, that kinda happened to me. We pulled into an Arizona town (motorcycle trip), and naturally found the local pub, or "tavern" as I think they call it there. Bellied up to the bar and started downing their local IPA -- I always like to sample "the local."

Now I'm a rather big guy, with lots of, ahem, experience managing my liquor. But by the time I was into only my second draft pint I was really getting hit hard. I make a comment about how tasty their beer is.

The barkeep leans over, and says: "You know, this is a Double-IPA". Its booze content rang in at 10%!

The buzzing in my head and the wobbly knees make sense... So naturally I have another, now that I know I'm not having a stroke :grin.
 

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Can we agree that the world always looks better seen through a pint of whatever suds you prefer.

... at least until the next morning when you realize that is wasn't a "light beer" after all.

Actually, that kinda happened to me. We pulled into an Arizona town (motorcycle trip), and naturally found the local pub, or "tavern" as I think they call it there. Bellied up to the bar and started downing their local IPA -- I always like to sample "the local."

Now I'm a rather big guy, with lots of, ahem, experience managing my liquor. But by the time I was into only my second draft pint I was really getting hit hard. I make a comment about how tasty their beer is.

The barkeep leans over, and says: "You know, this is a Double-IPA". Its booze content rang in at 10%!

The buzzing in my head and the wobbly knees make sense... So naturally I have another, now that I know I'm not having a stroke :grin.
We had a similar experience. We returned to the US for the first time after 6yrs out. During the time we were gone, the US experienced its craft beer boom. Needless to say, we were delighted seeing all the good beer everywhere - particularly IPA's. The first dinner out was at a brew pub, where we ate and had 3 beers each over 2hrs or so.

Then stood up to leave and was almost knee-walking. We couldn't understand why we felt drunk, because certainly 3 beers with dinner over 2hrs should be nothing to us. So we put it down to being tired or something like that.

The next day we looked up the beers we were drinking (IPA's) and found they were 9%. Turns out we got off easy because some of the others being served there were 11%.

I dislike this part of the craft brewing. I really like IPA's and want to drink more of them, not less. I don't understand why they keep cranking up the alcohol content of IPA. We now search out session IPA's that have a more normal 4-5% content.

Mark
 

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The few pubs I would frequent in Philly would list the % next to the beer. Maybe some state requirement? But I think it’s a great idea just so you don’t get unintentionally snookered. We were always walking home but even that’s challenge at times then you rally don’t want to look vulnerable when out and about.
 

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Old soul
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...I dislike this part of the craft brewing. I really like IPA's and want to drink more of them, not less. I don't understand why they keep cranking up the alcohol content of IPA. We now search out session IPA's that have a more normal 4-5% content.
I've found that my sweet spot for beer is in the 6-7% range. I like a beer with some bite, and up to that point I find the alcohol tends to enhance the other flavours. But beyond this I find that most high alcohol beers are less tasty and interesting.

The few pubs I would frequent in Philly would list the % next to the beer. Maybe some state requirement? But I think it’s a great idea just so you don’t get unintentionally snookered. We were always walking home but even that’s challenge at times then you rally don’t want to look vulnerable when out and about.
I'm seeing that more and more of that now, much like they're listing the IBUs. It's a good thing.
 

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I dislike this part of the craft brewing. I really like IPA's and want to drink more of them, not less. I don't understand why they keep cranking up the alcohol content of IPA. We now search out session IPA's that have a more normal 4-5% content...
My go-to session IPA is Founders All Day IPA, and my my regular IPA is Coppertail Free dive.

More body and depth of flavor in an ale comes from the blend of grains in the mash. The bitters, and flavors added in the boil contribute to flavor, finish, and aroma. Fermentation runs until sugars are gone or the alcohol kills the yeast, so the reality is that you really can't get a really bold beer without a highter alcohol volume.
 
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